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Extraordinary Popular Delusions And The Madness Of Crowds
     

Extraordinary Popular Delusions And The Madness Of Crowds

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by Charles Mackay
 

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2009 reprint of the 1852 second edition. Two volumes bound into one. Charles Mackay (1814-1889) was a Scottish poet, journalist, and song writer. He was born in Perth, Scotland. His mother died shortly after his birth and his father was by turns a naval officer and a foot soldier. He was educated at the Caledonian Asylum, London, and at Brussels, but spent much of his

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2009 reprint of the 1852 second edition. Two volumes bound into one. Charles Mackay (1814-1889) was a Scottish poet, journalist, and song writer. He was born in Perth, Scotland. His mother died shortly after his birth and his father was by turns a naval officer and a foot soldier. He was educated at the Caledonian Asylum, London, and at Brussels, but spent much of his early life in France. Coming to London in 1834, he engaged in journalism, working for the Morning Chronicle from 1835-1844 and then became Editor of The Glasgow Argus. He moved to the Illustrated London News in 1848 becoming Editor in 1852. He is best known for his classic Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowd, reprinted herein. Mackay covers many types of delusions, among them financial manias like the South Sea Company bubble of 1711-1720, the Mississippi Company bubble of 1719-1720, and the Dutch tulip mania of the early seventeenth century. According to Mackay, during this bubble, speculators from all walks of life bought and sold tulip bulbs and even futures contracts on them. Allegedly some tulip bulb varieties briefly became the most expensive objects in the world during 1637. Mackay's accounts are enlivened by colorful, comedic anecdotes, such as the Parisian hunchback who supposedly profited by renting out his hump as a writing desk during the height of the mania surrounding the Mississippi Company. Financier Bernard Baruch credited the lessons he learned from Mackay with his decision to sell all his stock ahead of the financial crash of 1929.Other chapters are devoted to Alchemists, scientists and pseudo scientists who attempted to turn base metals into gold. Mackay notes that many of these practitioners were themselves deluded, convinced that these feats could be performed if they discovered the correct old recipe or stumbled upon the right combination of ingredients.There are also extensive treatments on the Crusades, Witch Mania and Trials and other forms of mass delusion.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781578988082
Publisher:
Martino Fine Books
Publication date:
08/18/2009
Pages:
398
Product dimensions:
7.44(w) x 9.69(h) x 0.82(d)

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Extraordinary Popular Delusions And The Madness Of Crowds 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Buchepalus More than 1 year ago
This short version of Charles MacKay's book, Estraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds, which was first publilshed in 1841, should be on the reading list for anyone looking to make a fast buck, in the stock market or elsewhere. Change the names, places and time frame, and you would swear that it was just written. Amazing!! Popular delusions affect many investors - just ask Madoff, and other swindlers. The urge to "get rich quick" is mostly delussional. Once in ten thousand investments does one "hit the jackpot". The "Hula-hoop" back in the 50's is a classical example of hitting it big. President Obama should take the time to read this, but then again, he may not be invested in the market, or anywhere else. Americans are easily swayed by the "Rainmaker". This book, if read and compared to today's current affairs in the United States, and around the world, will reveal that human beings are gullable, as well as greedy, otherwise, they would be more cautious with whom they place their trust with their hard earned funds.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago