Extravagant Strangers: A Literature of Belonging

Overview

   Shakespeare called Othello "an extravagant and wheeling stranger/Of here and every where." In this exciting anthology, Caryl Phillips has collected writings by thirty-nine extravagant strangers: British writers who were born outside of Britain and see it with clear and critical eyes.  These eloquent and incisive voices prove that English literature, far from being pure or homogenous, has in fact been shaped and influenced by outsiders for over two hundred years.

   Here are slave writers, such as Ignatius

... See more details below
Paperback
$15.49
BN.com price
(Save 8%)$16.95 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (22) from $1.99   
  • New (8) from $9.92   
  • Used (14) from $1.99   
Extravagant Strangers: A Literature of Belonging

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$13.99
BN.com price

Overview

   Shakespeare called Othello "an extravagant and wheeling stranger/Of here and every where." In this exciting anthology, Caryl Phillips has collected writings by thirty-nine extravagant strangers: British writers who were born outside of Britain and see it with clear and critical eyes.  These eloquent and incisive voices prove that English literature, far from being pure or homogenous, has in fact been shaped and influenced by outsiders for over two hundred years.

   Here are slave writers, such as Ignatius Sancho, an eightieth century African who became a friend to Samuel Johnson and Laurence Sterne; writers born in the colonies such as Thackeray, Kipling, and Orwell; "subject writers," such as C.L.R. James and V.S. Naipaul; foreign émigrés, such as Joseph Conrad and Kazuo Ishiguro; and postcolonial observers of the British scene, such as Salman Rushdie, Ben Okri, and Anita Desai.  With the eloquent and often inspiring collection, Phillips proves, if proof be needed, that the greatest literature is often born out of irreconcilable tensions between a writer and his or her society.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Anderson Tepper
Extravagant Strangers is a fascinating, riveting collection reflecting a heterogeneous nation and its diverse sensibilities, often forged in conflict. . . the writing sure is good. -- Time Out New York
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780679781547
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 12/28/1998
  • Series: Vintage International Series
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 307
  • Product dimensions: 5.19 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.81 (d)

Meet the Author

   Caryl Phillips was born in St. Kitts, West Indies.  Brought up in England, he has written for television, radio, theater, and cinema.  He is the author of one book of nonfiction, The European Tribe, and six novels, The Final Passage, A State of Independence, Higher Ground, Cambridge, Crossing the River, and The Nature of Blood. His awards include the Martin Luther King Memorial Prize, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and a James Tait Black Memorial Prize.  He divides his time between London and New York.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Editor's Note
Preface
The Shortcomings of Christian England [1770] 1
Letter to Mr. Sterne [1776] 6
Voyage to England [1789] 9
A Word about Dinners [1846] 17
From The Nigger of the 'Narcissus' [1897] 25
The English Flag [1891] 36
Letter to David Kahma [1947]; Letter to Geoffrey Stone [1948]; Letter to Edgar Preston Richardson [1948] 41
Letter to Henry Eliot [1914]; Letter to Eleanor Hinkley [1914] 47
The Tiredness of Rosabel [1924] 54
First Steps [1979] 62
Bloomsbury: An Encounter with Edith Sitwell [1932] 72
Confessions of a Down and Out [1933] 83
From Choice of Straws [1965] 91
London at Night [1969] 103
In Defence of the Underground [1987] 109
From The Angel at the Gate [1982] 126
From The Lonely Londoners [1956] 135
'From Lucy: Englan' Lady' [1982]; 'From Lucy: Carnival Wedd'n', 1981' [1982] 145
From Three Continents [1987] 150
A Voyage [1954] 157
An Ingrate's England [1989] 169
First Impressions of London [1993] 172
From Little Eden: A Child at War [1978] 175
The Journey [1987] 183
From Oleander, Jacaranda [1994] 194
From Bye-Bye, Blackbird [1971] 208
From Darkest England [1996] 217
Living in Earl's Court [1984] 223
A General Election [1983] 235
From Pilgrim's Way [1988] 240
The Child I Never Was [1986]; Assassins [1983] 248
From Sour Sweet [1982] 251
Fly Away Home [1997] 260
Inglan is a Bitch [1980] 267
From Reef [1994] 271
From The Remains of the Day [1989] 280
London Taxi Driver [1988] 289
The Machine That Cried [1986] 292
Disparities [1986] 295
Acknowledgements 309
Index 313
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2004

    Beyond the post-modern and post-colonial

    Phillips may well prove to be the first intellectual to move beyond the now exhausted philosophy of post-Modernism--in light of post-colonial literary theory, the very perception of culture itself is marked invalid. In this book, Extravagant Strangers, Phillips reconciles his readers with a New World Order where 'culture' adopts a heterogeneous formula of exile absent of linear, authentic history.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)