The Eyes of Kid Midas
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The Eyes of Kid Midas

3.9 25
by Neal Shusterman
     
 

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Kevin Midas is sick of being picked on, teased and tormented. So when he finds a pair of magical sunglasses that give him the power to do—well, anything—he couldn't be happier. At first, Kevin spends his time pulling ice cream cones out of the air and getting every video game he ever wanted. But then he turns to darker wishes. What if he used the glasses

Overview

Kevin Midas is sick of being picked on, teased and tormented. So when he finds a pair of magical sunglasses that give him the power to do—well, anything—he couldn't be happier. At first, Kevin spends his time pulling ice cream cones out of the air and getting every video game he ever wanted. But then he turns to darker wishes. What if he used the glasses to get revenge?

In Neal Shusterman's dark fantasy, one boy finds out that sometimes, getting everything you want can be deadly.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
It's no coincidence that this novel's title and protagonist hark back to Greek mythology; this modern fantasy has the resonance and power of an ancient myth. Shusterman ( The Shadow Club ; What Daddy Did ) starts with a question--What if a typical seventh-grader could have anything he wanted?--and proceeds to a conclusion that makes time stop and the very universe dissolve. Along the way there is plenty of comedy and even sly foreshadowing in the shape of a good-natured jab at the sci-fi genre: ``That's what you get for messing with time and space,'' says Kevin, Midas's best friend, when a comic-book hero gets sucked into a black hole. Kevin gets sucked into a black hole of his own when he dons magic sunglasses that make his every wish come true, resulting in the near-annihilation of reality itself. Imaginative and witty, this fable for the '90s convincingly proves the dangers of the narcissistic ethos of having it all. With its original premise, unpredictable plot and whiz-bang finish, this book will handily captivate its audience. Ages 10-up. (Dec.)
The ALAN Review - Charles R. Duke
What if you were the wimp of the school and one day you found a pair of magical glasses that transformed your thoughts into immediate action? Kevin Midas finds such a pair of glasses on a mountain-climbing trip and plunges into a world filled with awesome power and frightening consequences; for a brief time, he reigns supreme among his peers only to discover that with power comes responsibility and decisions. Ultimately he decides his former world is preferable to the one the magic glasses bring him. Shusterman spins a fast tale with fable-like characteristics and well-drawn characters that should hold readers' interest; he also is able to raise some useful questions about power and the individual's responsibility to others. Suitable for junior-high as well as high-school readers.
School Library Journal
Gr 6-9-- Short and bespectacled, 13-year-old Kevin is the constant victim of the class bully, Bertram, but things change during a camping trip to a mountain that is supposedly sacred to the Native Americans of the region. After a grueling nighttime climb, Kevin reaches the top at dawn and finds a cool pair of sunglasses, which turn out to be saturated with the mountain's magic. They have the power of turning his desires into reality and making him master of his universe. From making ice-cream cones materialize to filling his house with video games, they grant his every wish, and things predictably get out of hand. Unfortunately, he cannot use the glasses to undo or reverse any of these actions, and when in anger he shouts at Bertram, ``Go to Hell!'' the ground opens up and swallows him. Eventually the fabric of reality starts to unwind and the world as he knows it becomes a thing of the past. Kevin later has a vision of Bertram struggling in chains in his own personally customized hell, in a wonderfully disturbing scene worthy of Stephen King. In general the imagery here is vivid and effective. The ending, in which the boy undoes everything he has done merely by returning the glasses to the mountaintop, may strike some readers as a simplistic cop-out, and the moral conclusion of his dilemma is the obvious one, but the novel features steady action with occasional touches of bizarre, inspired humor and is hypnotically readable. --Lyle Blake Smythers, Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781416997504
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
Publication date:
11/10/2009
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
176
Sales rank:
305,478
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.20(h) x 0.40(d)
Lexile:
900L (what's this?)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

Meet the Author

Neal Shusterman is the New York Times bestselling author of more than thirty award-winning books for children, teens, and adults, including The Unwind dystology, The Skinjacker trilogy, Downsiders, and Challenger Deep, which won the National Book Award. He also writes screenplays for motion pictures and television shows. The father of four children, Neal lives in California. Visit him at Storyman.com and Facebook.com/NealShusterman.

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Eyes of Kid Midas 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 24 reviews.
SecretBookshelf More than 1 year ago
This book was surprisingly good. If I hadn't been a huge fan of Neal Shusterman, I wouldn't have originally picked it up and decided to read it. While starting off with a slow start, by somewhere in the page range of 60-90 pages in, the book really started to get interesting. Once I reached the "turning point" I finished the book in a single sitting. The story, in a whole, was very strange. But, it was a very good kind of strange. Once the build up was complete, it was a 5 star book! All in all, I'm glad I read it. I'm not sure if I would recommend it to you, but I am glad I read it.
Dylan Owsiany More than 1 year ago
dont read editorial review unless you want to read the whole book in a minute
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book by Neal Shusterman is a book about a magical pair of sun glasses that Kevin Midas finds on the top of a mountain. When ever he wears them he has magical powers. Anything he says will come true.This book was boring for me because the things he does seem stupid.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wow! Neal Shusterman has really outdone himself with this book. I literally read the book in two days because i simply could NOT put it down. I kept reading and reading because the story just held me and i could not stop. I applaud Shusterman for wtiring this book. It is amazing and definentely has earned a very high place in my list of best books read. True talent.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hhow did the author come up eith yhiss book well... This is what every kid wants everything they want or need
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Help!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
seemed kinda spidermany what with the great power comes great responsibility stuff also predictible ending
Ethan Stanfill More than 1 year ago
first review and good book read it twice
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AlexChiem More than 1 year ago
This is my most favorite book of all time!!! It really makes me feel like a kid again, but it also teaches a valuable lesson at the end. I also shared this book to my friends/family members/ and book group they adored it!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
i just finished readng this book and thought it was very good. it was the book when i turned to at night when i couldn't sleep, even after i was practically dead asleep, the amzing story pulled me in making me turn page after page. i think that this was a very good bok and i definantly recomend it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i just finished this book today and thought it was an amazing web of adventure, at night i couldnt stop turning page after page hours after my bed time. it was a furius web of insanities, yet... it all made sence, i definately recommend this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I think this book is nice for kids or people who love mystery. This book is about a pair of sunglasses that were found on a mountain at a camp that Kevin stays at. The sunglasses have magical powers. The sunglasses lets Kevin get a lot of cool stuff. He gets everything a kid could dream of having. Then the glasses get a little to powerful for him to handle.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
While it isn't as good as Everlost or Unwind, The Eyes of Kid Midas is still a good read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
wow! all i can is it was amazing the way the author imagined about the flow of the story... it's so amazing.. and as a teen i can somehow relate to Kevin Midas, and just so you know before i read this book.. how i wished to have a power to get the things that i want,but then,as a lesson of the story, we can't get all the things that we want,if we do, lots of things will be affected...attitude,family,surrounding..friends and people who trust you.... tnx