The Eyes of the Amaryllis

( 7 )

Overview

When the brig Amaryllis was swallowed in a hurricane, the captain and all the crew were swallowed, too. For thirty years the captain’s widow, Geneva Reade, has waited, certain that her husband will send her a message from the bottom of the sea. But someone else is waiting, too, and watching her, a man called Seward. Into this haunted situation comes Jenny, the widow’s granddaughter. The three of them, Gran, Jenny, and Seward, are drawn into a kind of deadly game with one another...

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The Eyes of the Amaryllis

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Overview

When the brig Amaryllis was swallowed in a hurricane, the captain and all the crew were swallowed, too. For thirty years the captain’s widow, Geneva Reade, has waited, certain that her husband will send her a message from the bottom of the sea. But someone else is waiting, too, and watching her, a man called Seward. Into this haunted situation comes Jenny, the widow’s granddaughter. The three of them, Gran, Jenny, and Seward, are drawn into a kind of deadly game with one another and with the sea, a game that only the sea knows how to win.

The Eyes of the Amaryllis is a 1977 New York Times Book Review Notable Children's Book of the Year.

When eleven-year-old Jenny goes to stay with her widowed grandmother who lives by the seaside, she learns a great deal about the nature of love and the ways of the sea.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“The plot is simple but so well written and carefully constructed that its familiar elements—an estranged mother and son, an undying love—undergo a sea-change, too. And, for all its apparent simplicity, the images evoked are deep and complex.”—School Library Journal, Starred Review

“Having read this book, one feels changed, haunted for life.”—Minneapolis Tribune

“The language is as exotic as an underwater treasure trove.”—Book World

“Mrs. Babbitt paints late 19th century domestic and aquatic scenes with enormous sensitivity and uses language masterfully to achieve action and imagery. The characters of the widow and her granddaughter are superbly drawn. . . . The romance and symbolism will appeal strongly to adolescent girls.”—Poughkeepsie Journal

“This is a skillfully told story, offering a haunting and challenging read for the middle reader.”—The Baltimore Sun

“Babbitt wastes nary a word, deftly carving characters and events into a gripping tale, successfully using the sea both as an impelling atmospheric force and as an effective protagonist.”—Booklist

“The reader is treated to a poignant awareness of the power of love and its ability to shape the lives of those who experience it most deeply.”—St. Louis Post Dispatch

“Natalie Babbitt’s lightness of touch as she broaches deep and delicate themes is something admirable.”—The Christian Science Monitor

“An intricate combination of patterns, like a jacquard weave, the book succeeds as a well-wrought narrative in which a complex philosophical theme is developed through the balanced, subtle use of symbol and imagery. It is a rare story, accessible to the discriminating preadolescent; because of its perfect scale and transcendent style, it neither diminishes the subject nor the audience.”—The Horn Book Magazine

“An atmospheric, romantic tale.”—Kirkus Reviews

“‘Musical’ is a descriptor often applied, even over-applied, to poetry. But prose is just as obliged to rhythm and cadence, to the hum of warm vowels and the crackle of consonants. And there is music in the language of Natalie Babbitt’s 16th novel, which is fitting because she is so often describing the ocean. If you listen you can hear it roaring inside her sentences. Set in an unspecified bygone era but free of fancified old-timey verbiage, this book is a little gem—something to read in one evening, tucked up in bed.”—Philadelphia Inquirer

“Natalie Babbitt wastes no words in the telling of this gripping tale. Love story for sure, ghost story, maybe, but a story sure to entertain and haunt ten- to twelve-year-old readers.”—Armchair Interviews

“. . . the perfect time to stock your shelves with these elegantly designed editions.”—School Library Journal’s “Extra Helping” on Square Fish’s Babbitt reissues

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The ship Amaryllis sinks in a hurricane, but for 30 years the captain's widow waits for him to send her a message from the bottom of the sea. Her granddaughter waits with her, and ``the author reminds us that the line between reality and imagination is undefinable. Babbitt rings the bell again,'' PW said. (8up)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312370084
  • Publisher: Square Fish
  • Publication date: 8/21/2007
  • Edition description: STRIPPABLE
  • Pages: 144
  • Sales rank: 599,839
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 840L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.22 (w) x 7.61 (h) x 0.44 (d)

Meet the Author

A gifted artist and writer, Natalie Babbitt is the award-winning author of the modern classic Tuck Everlasting, Kneeknock Rise and many other brilliantly original books for young people. She began her career in 1966 as the illustrator of The Forty-ninth Magician, a collaboration with her husband. When her husband became a college president and no longer had time to collaborate, Babbitt tried her hand at writing. Her first novel, The Search for Delicious, established her gift for writing magical tales with profound meaning. Kneeknock Rise earned her a Newbery Honor Medal, and in 2002, Tuck Everlasting was adapted into a major motion picture. Natalie Babbitt lives in Providence, Rhode Island, and is a grandmother of three.

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Read an Excerpt

THE EYES OF THE AMARYLLIS

 

“Well, Mother,” said the big man uneasily, turning his hat round and round in his hands.

“Well, George,” the old woman returned. Her voice was strong and brisk, but, for him, a little critical. She looked up at him from her wing chair by the sunny window and saw—her son, yes, but also a stranger, well into middle age, tall but stooped, with the pale skin and scratchy-looking clothes of an inland man of business. And she saw in him also what he had been: a happy, wild-haired boy running barefoot on the beach. The two were one and the same, no doubt, but she loved the man because she had loved the boy. For her, the boy had been much easier to love.

“So you’ve broken your ankle,” the man said.

“So it seems,” she answered. She looked down impatiently at her foot propped up on a hassock. It was thick with bandages and wooden splints, and beside it on the floor a crutch lay waiting. “It’s a nuisance, but there you are. Where’s my granddaughter? Where’s my namesake?”

“She’s out on the beach. She’s—well, she’s never seen the sea before, you know. I suppose she’s…interested in having a look.”

“Interested! Yes, I should imagine so.” The old woman smiled faintly.

The man took a deep breath. “Look here, Mother, you know we’ve always wanted you to come and live with us in Springfield. Now that you’re laid up and can’t take care of yourself, it’s a good time to leave this godforsaken place and come inland where we can look after you.”

The old woman shook her head. “It’s good of you, George, of course. But when I wrote to you, that wasn’t what I had in mind at all. You’ve brought Geneva down to stay with me, haven’t you? That was the plan, wasn’t it? My ankle will mend, and when it does, I’ll go on the same as I always have.”

“I just don’t understand it,” her son exploded then. “All by yourself here, year after year! The sea pounding, day and night, the dampness, this blasted sand everywhere. And the wind! It never stops! I can hardly bear it for five minutes, and you’ve been listening to it for thirty years!”

“Fifty, George. You’ve forgotten. Your father and I, we came here fifty years ago.”

“No, but I meant…”

“I know what you meant,” she said. “You’re thinking it’s thirty years since the day your father was drowned.”

The man gripped his hat more firmly. “All right, Mother, never mind that. Be sensible for once and come back with me. There’s plenty of room for three in the buggy, and we can send a wagon later for your things. Surely you can’t be so all-fired stubborn about it now, when you can scarcely hobble.”

His mother shook her head again. “I don’t need you, George. Not yet. It’s not time yet. I’ll come to you at Christmas, just as I’ve always done. But the rest of the year I belong right here. Geneva can take care of me till my ankle mends, and then you can come and fetch her.”

“But, Mother!”

The old woman frowned at him and her eyes flashed. “George! Enough! We’ve had this argument a hundred times, and it bores me. You ran away from here a long time ago, and that’s all right for you. But I will not budge an inch, not one inch, until…” She paused and looked away. Her anger seemed to leave her all at once, and she sighed. “George. Send Geneva in to me and then—go away, George. We only make each other cross.”

At this the man seemed to sag a little. A look of pain crossed his face, and he turned half away from her, toward the door, though he watched her still. She was as handsome and vigorous as ever, her gray hair still streaked with red, her back straight as…a mast, he thought unwillingly, and then corrected it. Straight as a yardstick. A safer image.

She saw that he was watching her, and her face softened. “George. Dear boy, come and kiss me.”

He went to her at once and knelt, and she put her arms around him and pulled him close. For a moment, the last long thirty years dissolved. They were mother and child again, she newly widowed, he newly fatherless, and they clung to each other. Then she loosened her hold and pushed him away gently. “Tell me,” she said, smiling at him. “Geneva—what sort of child is she getting to be, do you think?”

“She’s exactly like you,” he said, sitting back on his heels.

The first Geneva Reade nodded and her eyes twinkled. “It’s a judgment on you, George. Well, send her in. And then go home to Springfield and leave me in peace.”

The big man kissed his mother’s cheek and stood up, putting on his hat. Then, at the door, he said carefully, “I should have thought, though, that you’d want to come away from this spot. I couldn’t stand it, looking out there every day, remembering. I’d have gone mad by now.”

“Mad?” said his mother. “Well, perhaps I am a little mad.”

“Mother,” he blurted then, turning back to her, “for the love of heaven, watch out for Jenny. She’s all we’ve got. Don’t let her—”

“Hang your clothes on a hickory limb, and don’t go near the water,” the old woman chanted, bobbing her head from side to side. And then she said, scornfully, “Don’t worry. I’ll keep her out of the sea. You weren’t such a faintheart before your father died.”

The man’s face closed. “I’ll be back in three weeks,” he told her flatly. “To fetch Jenny home. And if you’re not mended by then, you’ll come and stay with us till you are, whether you want to or not.”

“Goodbye, George,” said his mother, dismissing him. “Have a pleasant ride home. We’ll see you in a month or two.”

“Three weeks, Mother. Not a moment longer.”

“Goodbye, George,” said the first Geneva Reade.

 

Copyright © 1977 by Natalie Babbitt. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be used or reproduced in any manner whatsoever without written permission except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical articles or reviews.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 7 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2012

    Okay...but depressing

    This book was okay, definitley NOT my first choice, but not my last either. It had good characters, but the plot was incredibly boring and sort of confusing because of all the figurative language that is used. The book overall has a sad, depressing kind of atmosphere, although the ending is relatively happy.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 25, 2011

    loved it

    i had to read this in elementary school.it was not my first choice but from the back it sounded interestiing.when i got this as my second cchoice i was dissappointed.then i. read it.soo good

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2008

    Amazing book!

    I loved this book! It was one of the best books I ever read. Though I didn't really like the other books by the author, this was great.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2002

    Outlook

    It was alright I guess...plot could have been better though. I liked the characters George and Nicholas. Has good dialogue.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 14, 2000

    Not that Mysterious!!!!!!

    The summary of the book gave the illusion that it was a suspenseful novel, but even though it was interesting it was portrayed totally different. Without a real problem, the book doesn't have a very exciting plot. Although it has its downfalls, the book still has a wonderful character and setting description.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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