Fables, Volume 13: The Great Fables Crossover

Fables, Volume 13: The Great Fables Crossover

4.2 10
by Bill Willingham
     
 

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All nine issues of the long awaited crossover between Vertigo's two popular series Fables and Jack of Fables are collected here.

The world of Fables is introduced to a whole new set of characters...The Literals. The Literals are characters that embody, literally, different literary genres such as Mystery, Comedy and Romance. One of The Literals goes by the name The

Overview

All nine issues of the long awaited crossover between Vertigo's two popular series Fables and Jack of Fables are collected here.

The world of Fables is introduced to a whole new set of characters...The Literals. The Literals are characters that embody, literally, different literary genres such as Mystery, Comedy and Romance. One of The Literals goes by the name The Storymaker, one who can vanquish the world of Fables with one stroke of his pen.

When Jack discovers the existence of The Literals and their leader Kevin Thorn aka The Storymaker, Jack must leave his own book and crossover to the world of Fables to warn Fabletown about Kevin Thorn. Does the The Storymaker plan to close the book on the Fables universe once and for all?

The Great Fables Crossover features appearances from Fables favorites such as Snow White, Bigby Wolf, Rose Red, Jack Frost,
Beauty and The Beast.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The appeal of Fables has always been the reimagining of fairy tale characters as if they were as messy and screwed up as real people; the characters are divorcées, drunks, womanizers, and overall flawed beings. In this crossover of all the Fables characters from various spinoff books, Kevin Thorn, the creator of the world and its stories, is angry such liberties were taken with his characters and is determined to destroy the Fablesverse and start over. The regular Fables cast, Snow White, Bigby Wolf, and Jack (the one with the beanstalk)—with a few additions such as gun-toting embodiments of the library sciences and Thorn’s son, Mister Revise—try to stop Thorn before he writes them and the rest of the world out of existence. Unfortunately, most of what could be good ideas becomes burdensome, with zigzagging plot twists that bog down the pace. There are a lot of “meanwhiles,” and interesting side points and characters, but the overall plot is lacking. (Feb.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781401225728
Publisher:
DC Comics
Publication date:
02/09/2010
Series:
Fables Series , #13
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
246,022
Product dimensions:
6.60(w) x 10.10(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range:
17 - 18 Years

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Fables, Volume 13: The Great Fables Crossover 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 10 reviews.
SleepDreamWrite More than 1 year ago
The cover's nice. This one I like. I mean, the other volumes are good. But this one was okay. Has its moments.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You know how some characters live in worlds that conspire to allow their existence? Like James Bond, who skates through his adventures, improbably never receiving a bullet to the head or a nasty STD? That, in a nutshell, is Jack of Fables. When Jack departed Fabletown for his own book, it was a migration from a dramatic series with moments of wit and comedy to an out-and-out farce; a world, in short, where someone could behave like Jack of Fables and do well by it, with the recognition that behaving that way in Fables- a world more recognizably like our own- such behavior would likely make one a pariah at best, and at least as likely a corpse. Indeed, it was very much such a recognition that led to Jack's exodus in the first place. Now, the "Great Fables Crossover"... And sadly, the characters of Fables have been dragged into the world where Jack is largely rewarded for being Jack, and everyone else is diminished for it. Consequently, any drama, conflict, or sense of danger is replaced with eye-rolling antics and tedium, and the interaction of the "Literals" and the "Genres" is an excuse for such painfully on-the-nose symbolism and metaphor that it becomes difficult not to cringe. I'll admit, if it wasn't already obvious, that I'm not a big fan of Jack of Fables, at least not in his eponymous book incarnation. If you find that version a "loveable rogue", your mileage may differ. For me, he's like Fables' Prince Charming.... Only about half as smart, without an underlying sense of honor, and not actually charming.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I found the literals to be pretty fun. Hopefully they'll pop up again; perhaps in their own mini series or something. It's a nice reprieve from the "Mr. Dark" threat. I'd definitely recommend this one.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fantastic read!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fables is one of the absolute best graphic novel series I have ever read, and this one is no exception. Definitely read all of them!
Keepyerdamnereader More than 1 year ago
This entire series is worth a read. This volume deviates a little from the previous story line, but is still very entertaining. A must for graphic novel fans.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago