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Fabric of Vision: Dress and Drapery in Painting
     

Fabric of Vision: Dress and Drapery in Painting

by Anne Hollander, National Gallery of Great Britain Staff (Contribution by)
 
This beautifully illustrated and innovative book examines how artists have used clothing and drapery -- real and imagined, sacred and secular -- as elements in their paintings to give emphasis and emotional force to their figures. Drawing on works by artists over a span of six centuries as well as fashion plates, photographs and film stills, the author shows how

Overview

This beautifully illustrated and innovative book examines how artists have used clothing and drapery -- real and imagined, sacred and secular -- as elements in their paintings to give emphasis and emotional force to their figures. Drawing on works by artists over a span of six centuries as well as fashion plates, photographs and film stills, the author shows how drapery in painting evolved in the period following the Renaissance, becoming ever more flamboyant and theatrical, before the revolution of taste at the end of the eighteenth century saw a return to Neoclassical ideals of simplicity in art and dress.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Accompanying an exhibition at London's National Gallery of Art in summer 2002, this volume by fashion historian Hollander (Sex and Suits) demonstrates how artists used garments and draperies as an expressive means in their paintings. Covering Western European art from the Renaissance to the 20th century, Hollander shows how fabric in art reflected each era's social preoccupations, fashions, and tastes. For example, in the 15th century, representations of draperies demonstrated a respect for the properties of the cloth itself, while in the 16th and 17th centuries, rich drapery became used as an emotive, dramatic element. By the early 19th century, dress reflected a new classical simplicity, and the suit became the staple item for men. From then on, women's dress would be more the focus of emotion and sexuality, until the 20th century, when clothing was subordinated altogether to color and forms on a flat surface. The text is illustrated by more than 140 beautiful full-color illustrations of works by such artists as Tintoretto, Van Dyck, Delacroix, and Picasso. Throughout, Hollander brings new insight into the fields of both art and costume history. Recommended for libraries that collect books on art and costume.-Sandra Rothenberg, Framingham State Coll. Lib., MA Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781857099072
Publisher:
National Gallery Publications, Limited
Publication date:
01/01/2002
Pages:
176
Product dimensions:
8.90(w) x 10.98(h) x (d)

Meet the Author


Anne Hollander was an independent art historian, critic and historian of dress who was renowned for her bold studies of the evolution of costume. A fellow of the New York Institute for the Humanities and former president of PEN American Center, she was the author of influential books on the subject of costume and fabric in art, Seeing through Clothes and Sex and Suits, as well as Moving Pictures, on the influence of painting on cinema.

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