Face Bug

Overview

In this ingenious picture book, Children’s Poet Laureate J. Patrick Lewis invites you to visit the Face Bug Museum. There, readers can meet fourteen bugs in Lewis’s sly, humorous poems; gaze upon giant close-ups of the creatures’ faces in Siskind’s photographs; and follow the antics of two beetle friends in Kelly Murphy’s artwork. This is a trip to a museum—built by bugs, for bugs—unlike any other. It is also a poetry collection, macro-photography book, and illustrated story—all in one. Includes end notes with ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$13.03
BN.com price
(Save 23%)$16.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (12) from $10.98   
  • New (8) from $10.98   
  • Used (4) from $13.02   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

In this ingenious picture book, Children’s Poet Laureate J. Patrick Lewis invites you to visit the Face Bug Museum. There, readers can meet fourteen bugs in Lewis’s sly, humorous poems; gaze upon giant close-ups of the creatures’ faces in Siskind’s photographs; and follow the antics of two beetle friends in Kelly Murphy’s artwork. This is a trip to a museum—built by bugs, for bugs—unlike any other. It is also a poetry collection, macro-photography book, and illustrated story—all in one. Includes end notes with photographs of the entire bugs and further information about these creatures.
 

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

The Washington Post - Abby McGanney Nolan
Frederic B. Siskind's wonderfully creepy full-color photographs and Kelly Murphy's cartoony black-and-white illustrations are abuzz with activity alongside J. Patrick Lewis's witty verses about insects and spiders.
Publishers Weekly
Who says bugs aren’t cute? Lewis zeros in on insects’ best assets in this poetry book with a quirky concept: it’s the grand opening of the Face Bug Museum, which features closeup photos of insects. The accompanying poems are nimble and playful. One praises a feathery Goldenrod Stowaway Moth: “Startled by her beauty, I/ Bend down and whisper, ‘Hello.’/ A moth has perched upon a flower,/ A ‘goldenrod,’ bright yellow.” Museum visitors, ink-drawn cartoon bugs, provide funny side narratives (two butterflies take a break at the museum’s “Nectar Café”), while acting out some of the bug behaviors mentioned in the poems (e.g., a stinkbug lives up to its reputation). Siskind’s extraordinary photographs display every bristle, dew drop, and antenna. After appreciating these intimate portraits, readers will think twice before swatting a fly. Ages 6–up. (Mar.)
From the Publisher
"Bugs get a close-up in this new book of poetry that shows off their thousands of eyes, bucktooth incisors, prickly exteriors and more. Frederic B. Siskind's wonderfully creepy full-color photographs and Kelly Murphy's cartoony black-and-white illustrations are abuzz with activity alongside J. Patrick Lewis's witty verses about insects and spiders. Some bugs are cleverly camouflaged, while others flaunt their colors, but they all have something worth celebrating, even the slimy-seeming Eastern Dobsonfly. . . " — The Washington Post

. . ."There will be many returns to the Face Bug Museum as this book has so much to offer. Wonderfully conceived and executed."—School Library Journal

Children's Literature - Amy S. Hansen
Poems, drawings, and photos of bugs are in your face. They are up close and personal. They are charming, in a sort of science fiction-y way. And they are funny. J. Patrick Lewis, the Children's Poet Laureate for 2012-2013, has set up this book as if readers are bugs walking through a museum about bugs. In each double-page spread, Lewis profiles the "exhibits," including the Hickory Horned Devil, the American Horsefly, and the Green Stink Bug. The description is written from the exuberant view of the museum visitors (bugs). So for the Hickory Horned Devil, the narrator understands that the gigantic (six-inch) caterpillar is a vegetarian, and really not much of a devil at all, but still could be dangerous when he rolls over. The poems will make you smile and are wonderful read aloud. They could be paired with studies of the featured insects, although Lewis's narrator is not always completely factual. This is, after all, a fictitious museum. The accessibility of these bugs is a marvelous jumping off point for thinking about point of view both in writing and in science. That is, what do we call big and small? If we were a different size ourselves, would we view things differently? And if we were bugs going to a bug museum, what would we expect to see? Reviewer: Amy S. Hansen
School Library Journal
K-Gr 5—Visitors to this book get close-up, photographic views of 15 amazing creatures, including the Hickory Horned Devil and the Nursery Web Spider, whose eyes are impossible to avoid counting. "Eight black eyes in a whiskery face,/Eight round eyes in a dark crawl space/That never bother blinking back/Could give a kid a heart attack!" The endnotes, "written" in first person by the various bugs, describe "Where I Live," "How I Grow," "What I Eat," and "What Eats Me" with scientific accuracy and humor. Budding bug fans will love this title. The poems are funny and based on actual bug behavior and attributes, the photographic portraits of the faces and eyes are marvelous, and the ink and graphite drawings guide readers through the museum collection. Murphy's anthropomorphized creatures visit the "Nectar Café" and try on different pairs of glasses to sample being bug-eyed, compound-eyed, eight-eyed. The interactive science museum has gizmos such as cicada sound buttons and a camouflaged Goldenrod Stowaway Moth hidden in a cluster of flowers. Readers will not see bugs again in the same way: "You may think you've seen our Show Bugs in the trees or in the sky,/But you never really know bugs till you look them in the eye." There will be many returns to the Face Bug Museum as this book has so much to offer. Wonderfully conceived and executed.—Teresa Pfeifer, The Springfield Renaissance School, Springfield, MA
Kirkus Reviews
For kids who love bugs! Gruesome but fascinating photomicrographs of 14 different bugs are the focus of this unusual science book that combines poetry, line drawings and scientific facts to bring bugs alive for curious children. The bad puns flow relentlessly as a collection of small bugs, illustrated in rather dated-looking black-and-white line, visits the Face Bug Museum, where they learn to drill like a carpenter bee, experience the stinkbug's stench, sip on nectar at the snack bar and measure the speed of the green darner dragonfly. The insects on display at the "museum"--the hickory horned devil, goldenrod stowaway moth, praying mantis and other exotica--are portrayed in superb, full-color micrographs by renowned nature photographer Siskind. The large close-up of the "Clydesdale of all flies," the American horsefly, is particularly impressive. Humorous poems by U.S. Poet Laureate Lewis describe each insect; of the dogday harvestfly cicada, he writes, "What?! Two faces / On this mutt? / Creepy. Never / Mind his butt." Four pages of backmatter give the insects the opportunity to "narrate" a little more information about themselves. The insect jokes keep going all the way to the author bios, so determined is the book to remain light and accessible. The attempt to present science in a humorous way is a well-meaning one, but the effect seems rather lame for today's visually sophisticated kids and might work better as an app than a book. (Picture book/poetry. 6-10)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781590789254
  • Publisher: Boyds Mills Press
  • Publication date: 3/1/2013
  • Pages: 36
  • Sales rank: 98,914
  • Age range: 6 - 10 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.80 (w) x 10.40 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

J. Patrick Lewis is the 2011 winner of the NCTE Award for Excellence in Poetry for Children and is the current U.S. Children’s Poet Laureate. He has written more than sixty books for children and adults, including If You Were a Chocolate Mustache, Spot the Plot: A Riddle Book of Book Riddles and Please Bury Me in the Library. In Spring 2013, he has two other picture books scheduled: Poemobiles: Imaginary Car Poems (co-written with Douglas Florian, Schwarz & Wade) and World Rat Day: Poems About Holidays You Have Never Heard Of (Candlewick). He lives in Westerville, Ohio.

Frederic B. Siskind’s photographs have appeared in Life, National Geographic Kids, Nature’s Best, Natural History, Outdoor Photographer, and Birder’s World; in children’s books on lions, dragonflies, butterflies, caterpillars, fireflies, and amphibians; and in calendars published by Audubon, Teldon, and Shearson. He lives in McLean, Virginia.

Kelly Murphy has illustrated numerous picture books and chapter books, including the New York Times best seller Masterpiece; Secrets at Sea; and the Nathaniel Fludd, Beastologist book series. She teaches at the Rhode Island School of Design and lives in Providence, Rhode Island.

 

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)