×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Face-Changers (Jane Whitefield Series #4)
     

The Face-Changers (Jane Whitefield Series #4)

4.3 9
by Thomas Perry
 

See All Formats & Editions

With this stunning new novel of suspense, one of America's best writers of thrilling fiction moves to an entirely new level of brilliance and craftsmanship. "The books keep getting better," said Lawrence Block about Thomas Perry's Shadow Woman. But now, in The Face-Changers, Perry combines in a special way the superb storytelling, rich characters, and fine

Overview

With this stunning new novel of suspense, one of America's best writers of thrilling fiction moves to an entirely new level of brilliance and craftsmanship. "The books keep getting better," said Lawrence Block about Thomas Perry's Shadow Woman. But now, in The Face-Changers, Perry combines in a special way the superb storytelling, rich characters, and fine writing that have made his work so highly praised.

The courageous and ingenious Jane Whitefield has worked as a "guide" for over a decade, helping people in danger disappear. Now she has promised her new husband, Dr. Carey McKinnon, that she will never work again. But then Carey's mentor, a famous plastic surgeon, seeks him out, desperate and pursued, wounded and wanted for murder. Carey asks Jane to perform her dangerous magic one last time. But as Jane tries to save her husband's friend, she uncovers the perverse activities of the Face-Changers: Using Jane Whitefield's name, reputation, and techniques, they are destroying human lives rather than saving them.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Jane Whitefield, last seen in Perry's "Shadow Woman", is an alluring operative of Indian heritage who helps people disappear. It is an arcane pursuit, involving myriad skills and constant vigilance. In fact, when Jane gets married to surgeon Carey McKinnon, she hopes to give it up and lead a normal life. Unfortunately, McKinnon's mentor, plastic surgeon Dr. Richard Dahlman, who is accused of murdering his assistant and has been shot and wounded by police pursuers, is in urgent need of her services; and since McKinnon is convinced he is innocent, Jane agrees to employ her expertise one more time. Thus begins Perry's latest, which soon begets layer upon layer of deception and intrigue. It seems that Dahlman himself, with a series of operations, had helped someone attain a new identity, and that he is being pursued not by the police but by men intent on killing him for what he knows. But who are they? Re-establishing some of her old creepy contacts, Jane becomes convinced the villains are in the business of frightening people into believing they are in danger, then collecting vast sums to help them vanish. And now that the FBI is after Jane for Dahlman's escape, she is beleaguered on two fronts. This is really a prolonged chase novel, enlivened by some smooth action writing and a remarkable mastery of escape techniquesone would hate to be a debt collector in search of the author. It does seem in the end, however, an overly complex structure that obliges a reader to put up with long passages filled with nothing but the minutiae of pursuit and paranoia. The effect is somewhat claustrophobic, and Jane, for all her toughness and smarts, is not a particularly enlivening companion.
Library Journal
Perry ("Shadow Woman", LJ 5/1/97) has been writing great books for years and with his Jane Whitefield series has hit his stride. In this fourth title, Jane is asked by her surgeon husband to help his old mentor, Dr. Richard Dahlman, who has been accused of murdering his research partner. In her attempts to keep Dahlman out of the hands of the law and far away from the two men who want to kill him, she finds that someone is using her name to make people disappear permanently, and Dahlman has gotten caught in the backlash. In her quiet and resourceful manner, Jane goes about hiding the doctor, keeping her husband safe, and finding the vicious killers responsible for a number of murders. The plot is full of heart-stopping suspense, Native American lore, and engaging characters, but the real pull is how Jane will surmount adversity and still keep her honor and ethics intact. For all fiction collections. Jo Ann Vicarel, Cleveland Heights-University Heights P.L., OH
Kirkus Reviews
Dr. Carey McKinnon, the risk-aversive bridegroom who'd made Jane Whitefield promise to stop the hazardous career of helping people vanish ("Shadow Woman", 1997, etc.) now begs her to take his old mentor on the lam—plunging her into her most convoluted, if not exactly her most involving, caper. The police in two states don't have any doubts that eminent surgeon Dr. Richard Dahlmann murdered his equally eminent colleague, Dr. Sarah Hoffman—which is exactly why he needs to go underground, Carey tells Jane, while the case sorts itself out. But no sooner has Jane spirited Dahlmann out of the hospital where a police-pursuit bullet landed him—no mean feat, especially considering his weakened condition and the security cordon thrown around him—than she realizes that Dahlmann is just whistling in the dark in waiting for the cops to suddenly come to their senses. He's in a frame tight enough to cause serious weight loss—a frame that can only be the work of professionals (presumably the two armed men she passed on their way to Dahlmann's hospital bed) as good at their jobs as Jane is at hers. Why has Dahlmann been the target of such an elaborate campaign? The answer leads Jane not only to a series of three earlier murders nobody had even suspected, but to a ring of "face-changers"—people who, like Jane herself, are dedicated to helping people vanish, though they're a lot less scrupulous about their motives and tactics and selection of clients. In order to vindicate Dahlmann (and get guileless Carey off an impending charge of accessory to murder for helping him escape), Jane will have to stop her furious criss-crossing of the 48 states long enough to unmask thecopycats, get evidence of their criminal complicity, and stay one step ahead of her hundreds of pursuers. If this all sounds suspenseful, it is. But it's also tangled, unevenly paced (though endlessly inventive), and ultimately as exhausting for Perry's loyal fans as for his resourceful, long-suffering heroine.

From the Publisher
"The momentum never flags, and the suspense constantly builds." ---Booklist Starred Review

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780676577655
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/19/1998
Series:
Jane Whitefield Series , #4
Pages:
372

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher
"The momentum never flags, and the suspense constantly builds." —-Booklist Starred Review

Meet the Author

Thomas Perry is the author of many critically acclaimed novels, including the Edgar Award-winning The Butcher's Boy and the national bestsellers Death Benefits and Pursuit.

Joyce Bean is an accomplished audiobook narrator and director. In addition to being an AudioFile Earphones Award winner, she has been nominated multiple times for a prestigious Audie Award, including for Good-bye and Amen by Beth Gutcheon.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

The Face-Changers (Jane Whitefield Series #4) 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
ThePolyBlog More than 1 year ago
BOTTOM-LINE: Solid novel . PLOT OR PREMISE: Jane Whitefield is back, and she is trying to live up to her promise to her husband not to help any more fugitives to disappear. But then her husband brings her a Richard-Kimble-like friend who has been framed for the murder of his research assistant, but he can't even blame a one-armed man. Her husband asks her to help because the friend is his old mentor. . WHAT I LIKED: The story expands outward pretty fast, as Jane discovers that other people have been using her identity and reputation to "help" people for profit, in some cases where the people didn't need any help but were scared into thinking they did. Basically to create the demand for the service they can provide. So Jane has to figure that part out too, or she'll never be able to save anyone else again, let alone her husband's friend. Added to the mix is an FBI agent who wants to know what is going on, and knows Jane has the answers -- and he's willing to arrest her to find out. Aiding a fugitive is just the first charge of many he has in mind. Plus, just for fun, her husband is being hit on by one of the bad guys. . WHAT I DIDN'T LIKE: It's a little hard to follow at times as she criss-crosses the U.S. again, and some of the sub-stories are a little over-developed. . DISCLOSURE: I received no compensation, not even a free copy, in exchange for this review. I am not personal friends with the author, nor do I follow him on social media.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
constantreaderPA More than 1 year ago
This is a great mystery/thriller series. A woman protaganist, wonderfully portrayed by a male author. Intriging stories, a little background of Indian lore, a dash of sex and violence. Thomas Perry is a good writer as well as a good story teller. I have read this series in no particular order but you might want to start with Vanishing Act and read them all. Face Changers is one of the best.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Enjoyed learning more about the American Indian culture of the NE along with a good mystery read. Started the series with #3 and then went back to read #1 & 2.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago