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Face Dances [Bonus Tracks]
     

Face Dances [Bonus Tracks]

4.0 1
by The Who
 

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Without Keith Moon, the Who may have lacked the restless firepower that distinguished their earlier albums, but Face Dances had some of Pete Townshend's best, most incisive compositions since Quadrophenia. "Don't Let Go the Coat" was one of his better odes to Meher Baba,

Overview

Without Keith Moon, the Who may have lacked the restless firepower that distinguished their earlier albums, but Face Dances had some of Pete Townshend's best, most incisive compositions since Quadrophenia. "Don't Let Go the Coat" was one of his better odes to Meher Baba, "You Better You Bet" was a driving rocker, as was the rueful "Cache Cache," while "How Can You Do It Alone" was a solid ballad. While Townshend's songs were graceful and introspective, Roger Daltrey delivered them without any subtlety, rendering their power impotent. [The 1997 compact disc reissue adds five tracks to the original nine-song lineup, including three tracks that didn't make the album's final cut (Townshend's "I Like Nightmares," "It's in You," and "Somebody Saved Me") and two live tracks, a rough jam of "How Can You Do It Alone" and John Entwistle's "The Quiet One," from 1979 and 1982, respectively.] ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine & Cub Koda

Product Details

Release Date:
06/03/1997
Label:
Mca
UPC:
0008811163426
catalogNumber:
11634
Rank:
3000

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Face Dances [Bonus Tracks] 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
grg More than 1 year ago
The Who's first post-Moon album is a good album. Townshend's writing is very personal--no grand anthems here--but dead, spot on, and is cutting and incisive throughout. Daltrey's voice is in fine trim, and he gives excellent readings of these compositions (no matter what the reviewer to the left says). With Kenney Jones up on the riser instead of Keith Moon, does the album have a different feel than previous Who albums? Sure. But it's a good feel, a good sound. The Ox kicks major arse with some staggering bass work. Not just for Who diehards. And the remastered version has some excellent extra tracks.