Face: The New Photographic Portrait

Overview

"Several new books have focused on the portrait, none with as much clarity as Face." —American Photo

"Highly recommended for all collections."—Library Journal

This groundbreaking publication announces the death of the conventional portrait. In an age when we are bombarded with flawless images of youthful ...
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Overview

"Several new books have focused on the portrait, none with as much clarity as Face." —American Photo

"Highly recommended for all collections."—Library Journal

This groundbreaking publication announces the death of the conventional portrait. In an age when we are bombarded with flawless images of youthful beauty, when rejuvenation is available through a jar of cream or a scalpel, artists and photographers seek to portray the face in new ways.

Through a variety of techniques, including computer manipulation, photomontage, and retouching, the artists present their new portraits. They replace clarity with blur, the split-second with the elastic moment, questioning the notion of a fixed identity, of universality of expression, of what constitutes beauty.

Whether Cindy Sherman's disquieting disguises, Gillian Wearing's masked self-portrait, LawickMüller's composite portraits of couples, or Orlan's disturbing experiments with cosmetic surgery, these faces demand attention. 260 illustrations, 165 in color.
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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal

The human face has been widely photographed since the invention of the medium. Early on, it was believed that the study of a person's face could reveal aspects of an inner character. But for some time, there has been substantial skepticism of the notion of the photographic portrait as a window into the soul. In this groundbreaking work, the first comprehensive look at contemporary portraiture, Ewing (director, Musée de l'Elysée, Lausanne, Switzerland; The Body: Photoworks of the Human Form) investigates how emerging digital technologies have redefined the traditional portrait. He further explores the future of portraiture by bringing together 240 contemporary "portraits" from 113 international photographers, including Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Lee Friedlander, and Barbara Kruger. Ewing ingeniously places contemporary images of the face within a theoretical context, drawing on a diverse group of scholars and writers, among them Susan Sontag, Jean Baudrillard, and Marcel Proust. Highly recommended for all collections.
—Shauna Frischkorn Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780500287323
  • Publisher: Thames & Hudson
  • Publication date: 5/28/2008
  • Pages: 240
  • Product dimensions: 9.40 (w) x 11.00 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

William A. Ewing is Director of the Musée de l'Elysée in Lausanne.
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