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Facing Violence: Preparing for the Unexpected
     

Facing Violence: Preparing for the Unexpected

5.0 6
by Rory Miller
 

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This book stands alone as an introduction to the context of self-defense. There are seven elements that must be addressed to bring self-defense training to something approaching ‘complete.’ Training that dismisses any of these areas leaves you vulnerable:
Legal and ethical implications. To learn self-defense, you must learn force law. The

Overview

This book stands alone as an introduction to the context of self-defense. There are seven elements that must be addressed to bring self-defense training to something approaching ‘complete.’ Training that dismisses any of these areas leaves you vulnerable:
Legal and ethical implications. To learn self-defense, you must learn force law. The consequence is prison. Side by side with the legal rules, everyone must explore his or her own ethical limitations. Most people don’t really know where this ethical line lies within them.
Violence dynamics. Self-defense must teach how attacks happen. You must be able to recognize an attack before it happens and know what kind you are facing.
Avoidance. You need to learn and practice not-fighting. Learning includes escape and evasion, verbal de-escalation, and also pure not-be-there avoidance.
Counter-ambush. If you didn’t see the precursors or couldn’t successfully avoid the encounter, you will need a handful of actions, trained to reflex level, to deal with a sudden violent attack.
Breaking the freeze. Freezing is almost universal in a sudden attack. You must learn to recognize a freeze and break out of one.
The fight itself. Most martial arts and self-defense instructors concentrate their time on the fight. It just needs to be in line with how violence really happens in the world.
The aftermath. There are potential legal, psychological, and medical effects of engaging in violence no matter how justified. Advanced preparation is critical.

Editorial Reviews

Robert Crowly
"Lightning in a bottle."
Mark ‘Animal’ MacYoung
"Straight forward, life saving information."
Dr. Kevin Keough
"Brutally honest voice about…violence."
Lt. Jon Lupo
"When you’re done reading, read it again."
Al Dacascos
"A game change."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781594392375
Publisher:
YMAA Publication Center, Inc.
Publication date:
04/01/2014
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
242
Sales rank:
375,716
File size:
936 KB

Meet the Author

Rory Miller has been studying martial arts since 1981. He’s a bestselling writer and a veteran corrections officer. He’s taught and designed courses on Use of Force Policy and Decision Making; Police Defensive Tactics; Confrontational Simulations; and as a sergeant, he led and trained his former agency’s Corrections Tactical Team. In 2008 and 2009, he taught methods to operate a secure prison for the Iraqi Corrections Systems, Iraq. Rory Miller resides near Portland, Oregon.

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Facing Violence: Preparing for the Unexpected 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
NotReallyHere More than 1 year ago
If you train or study martial arts and part of that training covers self-defense, you owe to yourself to read this book. Martial artists tend to focus on the fight part of self-defense and Rory points out that there are 6 other areas you better cover in training. As a martial artist and one interested in self-defense I found myself reading several parts of this book more then once. If the book doesn't make you think then you either are already covering all of these areas or you didn't read it closely enough. I would even recommend this book to those not interested in self-defense just for the chapter on avoiding violence.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Practical. Good basic info.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago