Fade to Blue: An Evan Horne Mystery

( 2 )

Overview

Jazz pianist Evan Horne, settled into the San Francisco jazz scene, takes a gig in Los Angeles, where he’s offered his most unusual job yet. Mega movie star Ryan Stiles hires Evan to teach him to look like he’s playing piano for an upcoming film role. Evan stays at Stiles’ lush Malibu home for the tutoring, but suddenly things go wrong with the arrogant, spoiled star. Stiles’ adversarial   relationship with the paparazzi explodes when a photographers is killed. Was it an accident or is Stiles himself a ...

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Overview

Jazz pianist Evan Horne, settled into the San Francisco jazz scene, takes a gig in Los Angeles, where he’s offered his most unusual job yet. Mega movie star Ryan Stiles hires Evan to teach him to look like he’s playing piano for an upcoming film role. Evan stays at Stiles’ lush Malibu home for the tutoring, but suddenly things go wrong with the arrogant, spoiled star. Stiles’ adversarial   relationship with the paparazzi explodes when a photographers is killed. Was it an accident or is Stiles himself a suspect? Evan wants out, but Stiles’ manager dangles the opportunity for Evan to score the film if he stays. Stiles is cleared but when the film begins, another mysterious death occurs, and somebody is blackmailing the star. With help from his FBI girlfriend, Andie Lawrence, and Lt. Danny Cooper, Evan launches his own investigation to help clear Stiles. To further complicate things, Evan’s old nemesis, serial killer Gillian Sims escapes from prison.
 

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"The fascinating process of teaching an actor to fake playing the piano gives Moody, a jazz musician himself, another avenue to doing what he does best, incorporating vividly rendered slices of a jazzman’s life into a satisfying crime story." —Booklist

"A mystery marked by tight plotting, a brisk pace and a satisfying solution." —Kirkus Reviews

"One thing you can't teach a jazz drummer like Bill Moody is timing – from the intro to the coda, Fade to Blue moves to an easy rhythm that never skips a beat." —John Harvey, award-winning author of the Charlie Resnick mystery series

"Outstanding writing." —Ron Carter, jazz bassist

"Looking for Chet Baker is thoughtful entertainment and like Baker's music it is open to anyone."  —New York Times on Looking for Chet Baker

"Evan's sixth case offers an infectiously mellow first person narrative, a nostalgic undertone and a nicely drawn combo of sidemen."  —Kirkus Reviews on Shades of Blue

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781590588949
  • Publisher: Poisoned Pen Press
  • Publication date: 4/5/2011
  • Series: Evan Horne Series
  • Pages: 250
  • Sales rank: 1,042,624
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 8.60 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Jazz drummer Bill Moody has toured and recorded with Maynard Ferguson, Jr. Mance, Jon Hendricks, and Lou Rawls. He lives in northern California where he hosts a weekly jazz show, and is the author of a dozen short stories in various collections, and six earlier Evan Horne novels.

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Read an Excerpt

Fade to Blue

An Evan Horne Mystery
By Bill Moody

Poisoned Pen Press

Copyright © 2011 Bill Moody
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-1-59058-896-3


Chapter One

"Oh my God," Andie says. "You're going to teach Ryan Stiles how to play piano?"

"Settle down, girl. I said I'd think about it."

We're in a late-night deli on Wilshire waiting for pastrami sandwiches and coffee. Coop is drumming his fingers on the table, scanning the room for our waitress. Andie leans back in the booth and gazes at the ceiling. "Ryan Stiles. I mean he's just so ..."

"Dreamy?" Coop offers sarcastically, and catches my eye. "How much are they going to pay you for this, ah, service?"

"Yes," Andie says. "Dreamy. All that dirty-blond hair and those piercing blue eyes."

"We didn't talk about money, and anyway I didn't say I'd do it."

"Oh, you have to," Andie says, gripping my arm. "I so want to meet Ryan Stiles. Could we visit the set, maybe have dinner with him?"

I laugh. "Listen to Miss Starstruck FBI Agent. Maybe I can get Coop on as the police consultant, too."

"Hmm. I like that idea," Coop says as the waitress brings our order. "My years of experience could lend a certain authenticity. They always get it wrong in these cop movies."

"They usually get the music wrong, too," I say. "How many times have you watched a scene where a band is playing? The drummer is clearly playing brushes but what you hear is a stick on the cymbal."

Coop and Andie look at each other. "Who notices something like that?" Andie says. Coop nods in agreement.

I shrug and give up. We wolf down the sandwiches and Andie is impatient for the check.

* * *

"C'mon, baby, I'm in a mood now."

The second night at The Bakery goes just as well as the first, but there's no sign of either Grant Robbins or Ryan Stiles, and frankly, I'm relieved. On Saturday, however, I spot Robbins in a front-row seat, next to a man with long dark hair and even darker sunglasses. I try to ignore Robbins' presence and not think about how I'm going to tell him I'm going to pass on his proposal.

I'd spent Friday browsing through some movies on the hotel's VCR while Andie was out visiting old friends from the L.A. Bureau. Robbins was right, I thought, as I watched Martin Milner look pretty convincing as a guitarist in Sweet Smell of Success, Steve Allen as Benny Goodman, Jimmy Stewart as Glen Miller, and Richard Gere as a trumpet player in Cotton Club. Sal Mineo playing Gene Krupa looked good, but then, he actually played drums, so he had all the moves down, and it was Krupa playing on the score.

I was disappointed in Spike Lee's Mo Better Blues. Denzel Washington looked like he knew his away around a trumpet, but after being beaten up, he turns up at a jazz club a year later and discovers he can't play. Wouldn't he have tried at home first? Maybe I'm just too picky.

I had to admit Forrest Whittaker was the most impressive as Charlie Parker in Bird. Who tutored him, I wondered? Probably saxophonist Lennie Neihaus, who scored most of Clint Eastwood's films.

But now, I lose myself in "My Foolish Heart" as we finish our last set at the Jazz Bakery. When I look up from the keyboard, Robbins is gone. I thank the audience once again, sorry to have the gig over. Nothing until a few days at Yoshi's in San Francisco next month.

I head back to the dressing room and find Grant Robbins and the man I'd seen next to him waiting for me. The long dark hair and the sunglasses are gone. He jumps to his feet and grabs my hand, and I'm shaking hands with Ryan Stiles.

"Oh man, that was so cool," Stiles says. "You're even better in person than on record." He turns to Robbins. "Isn't he?"

Robbins smiles. "I told you, didn't I?"

"Man, I can't wait to get started. Whatta you say, Evan? You going to do this for me?"

I sit down and look at them both. Up close and personal, Stiles is even more impressive. The unruly blond hair, the glimmering blue eyes, the persuasive voice are all part of the package. He's shorter than I thought, but has a compact athlete's body. I imagine few people ever refuse to do anything Ryan Stiles wants. He's like a young Robert Redford, exuding charm—and now he's turning it all on me.

Robbins considers for a moment, taking in my expression, deciding, I think, how best to handle me. "Well, Evan. Have you given our proposal some thought?

I light a cigarette and sit down. "Yeah, I have," I feel Stiles' eyes on me. "Look, I'm very flattered, but I think I'm going to pass on this." I see Stiles slump down in his chair and clasp his hands as he looks at the floor. "There's a couple of great players who've done movie work I can recommend."

"Is it me?" he says quietly. "You don't like me?"

"I don't even know you," I tell Stiles. "I just, I don't know, it just doesn't feel like something I want to do."

"Tell him," Stiles says to Robbins. I look at Robbins.

He nods and takes a slip of paper out of his suit jacket and hands it to me. "I told you you'd be well compensated."

I look at the number. "You've got to be kidding. Five hundred dollars an hour?"

Robbins smiles. "Less than a good attorney gets these days."

"I'm sure, but—"

"Tell him the rest," Stiles says, cutting me off.

"Ryan has optioned this script. We have full control over casting and more importantly, the music." He pauses again for one more look at Stiles. "We—Ryan, wants you to score the movie, and for fun, you'd have a cameo role. You could stay at Ryan's beach house in Malibu while you work with him. Scoring the film would be a separate deal of course, with very generous compensation."

They both watch me as my mind reels. I probably look like I've just been told I won the lottery. Always, somewhere in the back of my mind, has been the desire to score a film and here it is, dropped in my lap. "I don't know what to say."

Stiles looks at me, his megawatt smile on full charge. "Just say yes, man. Do this for me."

"I took the liberty of drawing up a preliminary contract," Robbins says. "I can have it to you first thing tomorrow. In the meantime, we've reserved a suite for you at the Beverly Hills Hotel, while you consider further." Robbins pauses. "If that's necessary," he adds.

I lean back and put my hands up. "Whoa, slow down," I say. "This is all coming too fast."

"Hey, no pressure," Stiles says. "We want you to be comfortable is all. Bring your lady of course."

No pressure? Teaching a major movie star how to look like he's playing piano for five bills an hour, scoring his film, a Beverly Hills Hotel suite while I decide? "I just need a little time to think, and I'd like to talk this over with Andie, my girlfriend."

"Absolutely," Robbins says. "I understand. Take your time." He gets to his feet. Stiles stands and takes my hand, those piercing blue eyes boring into me with all the sincerity he can muster.

"Do this for me, Evan. Your playing is awesome. If I can just look enough like you, I'll show these Hollywood assholes I can act." He nudges my shoulder. "Is there a back door out of here?" He dons the dark wig and sunglasses. "Paparazzi." He shrugs, even manages to look a little sheepish.

Robbins shakes my hand. "Thanks for listening, Evan. I'll make arrangements for your hotel. You can check in tomorrow and we'll have a car pick you up."

For several minutes, I sit there in the spartan Jazz Bakery dressing room, wondering what it's going to be like to work with Hollywood royalty.

"What's he like?" Andie wants to know. "Did you talk to him?" She's kneeling on the bed facing me as I lean back against the headboard in our hotel.

"Of course I talked to him. He's seems okay. He likes my playing and—"

"He's okay? How can you be so calm? Do you know how many people would like to meet and talk with Ryan Stiles?"

"I'm guessing a lot." I have to laugh, seeing how excited Andie is. She just stares at me, shaking her head. "Okay, it's pretty heady stuff. Not because it's Ryan Stiles but that they want me to score the movie. I'm not sure what it will be like seeing him on a daily basis for the piano lessons."

"Evan, listen to me. You deserve this. All the years you've spent scuffling for gigs, the setbacks, the disappointments. You have to do this. Just think about us sitting in a darkened theater, the credits rolling and we see: Music by Evan Horne." She looks toward the wall and waves her hand across it dramatically.

She jumps up and straddles me, her hands around my neck. "You're going to do this, Evan Horne."

I lie awake long after Andie falls asleep. Scoring a movie, even a small one, could open a lot of doors. I squeeze my right hand into a fist. Still no pain, but how long is it going to last? Is it time to start thinking about a future without playing the piano? Andie is right. I couldn't get near somebody like Ryan Stiles, and here he is coming after me.

* * *

We're just about finished packing when the phone rings. Andie answers, nods, and mumbles a few times. "Yes, that's fine. We're ready." She hangs up and turns to me. "Our car is here. They're sending somebody up for the bags." She looks at me for a moment. "What car? Where are we going?"

I try to hide my smile as I zip up my bag. "Oh, Ryan sent the car. We're going over to the Beverly Hills Hotel for a couple of days while I think things over." I duck when she throws a pillow at me.

"Oh my God, I've got to go shopping."

We go down to the lobby and are shown outside to a black Lincoln town car. The driver touches the bill of his cap and opens the door for us, as a bellman stores our bags in the trunk. We get in and settle back for the short ride to Beverly Hills.

Andie squeezes my hand and slides against me. "You know what one of my fantasies is?" she whispers in my ear.

"I can guess, but it's ten o'clock in the morning." I glance at the rearview mirror and catch the driver's eyes and we both smile.

At the Beverly Hills Hotel, two bellmen greet us. One takes our bags. The other escorts us to the front desk where the manager, dressed in an expensive suit, smiles and flourishes a pen for me to sign in.

"Your suite is ready, Mr. Horne. Just sign here please. As a guest of Mr. Stiles, please don't hesitate to call on me for anything." He smiles again and we cross the lobby with the bellman just ahead of us. At the elevator, we step aside and several people get out.

Andie nudges me and whispers. "That was Jane Fonda."

Our room overlooks the pool. It's large, airy, and furnished like a condo. On a table is a large basket of fruit, a bottle of wine, and a carton of my brand of cigarettes. There's a card with them. "Enjoy," it says. "RS." I show the card to Andie. She wanders around, taking in the rich furnishings, the canopy bed, and the bathroom that's bigger than some of the apartments I've lived in.

"I feel a long bath coming on." She looks at the array of bath oils and lotions.

When the phone rings, it's Grant Robbins. "Evan. I trust everything is to your liking?"

"Perfect. This is all very generous."

"How about lunch," Robbins says. "One o'clock. Ryan will be joining us so we can talk details a bit more."

"Fine, I'd like that."

"Great," Robbins says. "The patio dining room."

I hang up and turn to Andie. "Better take that bath. We're having lunch with Ryan Stiles."

Just before one, Andie and I arrive at the hotel restaurant. Before we can say a word, the manager appears and escorts us to a plush booth surrounded by palms and flowers. Grant Robbins rises as we approach and holds out his hand to Andie.

"Miss Lawrence, how nice to meet you." Andie has outdone herself with a quick shopping trip for a mid-thigh dress and heels, and her hair fluffed up like she'd combed it with her fingers. Tasteful yet very sexy, as only Andie can be. She looks anything but an FBI agent.

"My pleasure," she says, taking Robbins' hand and sliding into the booth as she looks around.

Robbins catches her. "Don't worry, Ryan will be joining us shortly. He's finishing up a few scenes this morning for a new film."

I slide in next to Andie. Robbins sits on the other side of her. A waiter appears instantly and takes our drink orders. Bloody Marys all around.

"Well," Robbins says. "I hope everything is all right. Room okay?"

"It's lovely," Andie says, sounding almost shy.

"Yes," I say. "Thank you very much, but none of this was really necessary."

"Nonsense," Robbins says. "I admit, we wanted to impress you, give you a taste of what's in store. I trust you've given our little proposal some more thought."

Before I can answer, Robbins looks up. "Ah, here's Ryan." He gets to his feet as Ryan Stiles approaches. He's in jeans, running shoes, and a light pullover sweater, his eyes hidden behind the dark glasses.

He takes off the glasses and zeros in on Andie. "Wow, the most beautiful FBI agent I've ever seen." He offers his hand and Andie almost knocks over a water glass as she reaches out to shake it.

"Hello," is all she can manage as she stares.

Stiles sprawls in the booth next to Robbins as a waiter appears with a tall glass of orange juice. I can't tell if it's just juice or spiked with vodka.

"So, everything cool? Grant take care of you guys?" "Yes," Andie and I say in unison.

"Good." Stiles turns to Robbins. "You need to speak to that director," he says. "We had to do three takes for that one dumb scene."

Robbins nods. "I'll handle it." He takes out his cell phone and dials a number. "Excuse me for a minute," he tells us, waiting for his call to go through.

Ryan smiles and shrugs our way. "Sorry," he says. "Just some artistic differences."

Andie and I sip our drinks as Robbins talks softly but firmly to whoever is on the other end. He clicks the phone shut. "All taken care of," he tells Stiles, who just nods as if he knew it would be.

"So, how 'bout some lunch?"

Robbins does most of the talking as we work our way through some melt-in-your-mouth grilled salmon, risotto, and a caesar salad. It's more about how much he and Ryan want me to join the Stiles team in what could be cinematic history, the way he describes it.

By the time we order coffee, I have some questions of my own. "What is the story about in this script?"

Robbins and Stiles exchange glances. "There's a security issue with the script," Robbins says. "As I'm sure you can imagine, the press would love to know what Ryan's next project is. Until we know you're with us, we prefer to keep the content confidential. I'm sure you understand."

I don't but I let it go. "So I would get to see the script if I agree to score the film?"

"Of course," Robbins says. "Absolutely."

"He means when we have you signed," Stiles chimes in with a big smile.

It all seems a bit over the top to me. It is, after all, only a movie, but I guess Robbins has a point. Both men look at me expectantly.

I glance at Andie, who manages to take her eyes off Stiles long enough to give me a searching, you-better-do-this look. Under the table I feel her hand squeeze my leg.

"Okay, here's what I've decided. I'm in for the piano tutoring. I still want to take some more time on the rest of your offer if that's okay with you." I catch a slight frown from Stiles but Robbins touches his shoulder.

"Well, we're halfway there, then, aren't we."

I hear Andie sigh in relief. "I guess we are."

Stiles jumps up and grabs my hand. "Way cool, man, way cool!" He glances at his watch. "I have to get back to the set. Grant will fill you in on the details. I can't wait to get started on this." He waves at Andie and then he's gone.

Robbins has already taken some papers from a slim leather briefcase beside him and slides them across to me. "This is the formal agreement," he says. "Nothing tricky, just the payment terms. If you'll just sign where the arrow is."

I glance at it briefly, see nothing unusual, and take the Mont Blanc pen Robbins offers, aware of Andie's eyes on me as I scribble my signature and hand it back. He pulls off one copy. "This one's for you," he says, and returns the rest to his briefcase. He stands. "Sorry to run off, but I have several pressing matters to handle. Enjoy your stay. I'll call you about the beach house."

Andie and I lean back and look at each other. "What beach house?"

(Continues...)



Excerpted from Fade to Blue by Bill Moody Copyright © 2011 by Bill Moody. Excerpted by permission of Poisoned Pen Press. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 21, 2011

    Great Read!! Really Enjoyed It!!

    What a great read! I didn't know that I would enjoy this story as much as I did. The writing is really captivating in that it completely held my attention. It's a mystery story and it a look at behind the scenes in Hollywood. The author Billy Moody takes us into the world of jazz musicians and into the world of movie making. He also explores the love/hate relationship that current celebrities have with the paparazzi.

    Evan Horne, the main character, is a decent man who is trying to establish himself as a jazz musician who keeps stumbling into mysteries and adventures. This is actually the sixth outing for Horne but it can also be a stand alone novel. Jazz musicians rarely become "famous" musicians and it is quite tempting when he is asked to teach a famous actor to look like he is playing the piano for a movie with the dangling carrot of scoring the movie. Thus Evan is able to easily put up with the shenanigans of the actor, Ryan Stiles, as the possibility of creating the movie score increases as Evan helps out Ryan and his manager. There is a side story of serial killer Gillian Sims escaping from prison but that does not really add much to story as a whole. I don't want to give too much away but it does provide a bit of enlightening if you haven't read the previous novel in the series. Good conclusion though somewhat expected and of course totally believable.

    Highly recommend this book! Great read!!

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  • Posted February 27, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    The latest Evan Horne mystery is an engaging tale

    Though he is part of the San Francisco jazz scene, Evan Horne accepts a paying gig in Los Angeles. Actually in Malibu where he has been retained to train actor Ryan Stiles to appear on the silver screen as if he playing jazz piano.

    However, the spoiled film star rages during a paparazzi attack and a photographer dies. Evan wants to go home as the money is not worth the effort of dealing with the pampered Ryan even in the plush beach home. However, Stiles' manager offers him the chance to score the film if he continues to teach the actor to look as if he plays the piano. The police determine Stiles is innocent of the death, but while filming a second person dies and a blackmailer extorts money from the beleaguered star. Evan. assisted by his FBI girlfriend Andie Lawrence and LAPD Police Lieutenant Danny Cooper, investigates while serial killer Gillian Sims escapes from prison.

    The latest Evan Horne mystery is an engaging tale that is fun to read, but lacks the intriguing jazz pedigree of Shades of Blue, Looking for Chet Baker and Bird Lives! The story line is fast-paced as Evan decides to do what he believes is the right thing though he detests his mercurial student. Although the serial killer subplot feels forced and unnecessary, fans will enjoy Bill Moody's entertaining musical mystery.

    Harriet Klausner

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