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Fado: Exquisite Passion
     

Fado: Exquisite Passion

 
Every few years, it seems, the dramatic mystery of Portuguese music returns to the spotlight. The fado-esque Madredeus was the toast of world music in the mid-'90s and the inspiration for Wim Wenders's film Lisbon Story, thanks to the arresting soprano of Teresa Salgueiro. In 2003, the international success of

Overview

Every few years, it seems, the dramatic mystery of Portuguese music returns to the spotlight. The fado-esque Madredeus was the toast of world music in the mid-'90s and the inspiration for Wim Wenders's film Lisbon Story, thanks to the arresting soprano of Teresa Salgueiro. In 2003, the international success of Mariza, a captivating Mozambican-born fadista hailed by the BBC's Radio One, has once again brought this dreamy music to the fore. Powered by existential longing, a ringing Portuguese guitarra, and the aching, semi-operatic wail of the suffering singer, fado is exquisitely moody. Yes, there are happy fados, jaunty, skipping strolls through Portugal's green fields, but it's the chiaroscuro tales of grief and revenge that captivate most. In addition to Mariza, this collection presents two more young talents. Cristina Branco has a severe, almost neoclassical approach to the music, her voice quivering and floating like a gull above the waves. Mafalda Arnauth, three years Branco's junior, brings more brawn to her interpretations, and a jazzy sensibility, especially on "Talvez Se Chame Saudade," as well as a co-writer's credit for "O Instante dos Sentidos." Rounding out the collection are three recordings from the woman who inspired the others, fado's undisputed queen, Amalia Rodrigues. It's easy to hear her influence, and worthwhile to listen for the new perspectives brought to the music by a younger generation.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Rick Anderson
"Fado" is a word that means "fate" or "destiny" in Portuguese, but it is also the name of a unique genre of heartbroken love song that has its origins in the Lisbon subculture of the early 19th century, in which the lifestyle and music that took on the name "fado" were defined. The word refers, in part, to the lyrical content of the songs themselves, which is usually concerned with the interference of fate or destiny in the romantic life of the singer. This disc brings together several tracks each by four of Portugal's most important current practitioners of the tradition: Mafalda Arnauth, Cristina Branco, Mariza, and the grande dame of modern fado, Amália Rodrigues. Accompanied only by six-string classical guitar and/or the Portuguese 12-string guitarra, these four women offer an excellent introduction to the fado tradition. Highlights include Cristina Branco's sweetly heartbroken performance of "Ai Vida," as well as the slightly gruffer-voiced Mafalda Arnauth's equally gorgeous "Talvez Se Chame Saudade," but it is the apparently ageless Amália Rodrigues who really takes charge, on songs like "Primavera" and the elegant and almost operatic "Foi Deus." Very highly recommended.

Product Details

Release Date:
09/02/2003
Label:
Narada
UPC:
0724358410426
catalogNumber:
84104

Tracks

  1. As Fontes
  2. Ai Vida
  3. Por Ti!
  4. Com Que Voz
  5. Meu Amor e Marinheiro
  6. O Instante dos Sentidos
  7. Primavera
  8. Meu Amor, Meu Amor
  9. Loucura
  10. Talvez Se Chame Saudade
  11. Post-Scriptum
  12. Esta Voz Que Me Atravessa
  13. Foi Deus

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