Fahrenheit 451

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Overview

Internationally acclaimed with more than 5 million copies in print, Fahrenheit 451 is Ray Bradbury's classic novel of censorship and defiance, as resonant today as it was when it was first published nearly 50 years ago.

Guy Montag was a fireman whose job it was to start fires...

The system was simple. Everyone understood it. Books were for burning ... along with the houses in which they were hidden.

Guy Montag...

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1993 Hardcover Near Fine with no dust jacket 067187229x. In Near Fine slipcase. No. 394 of 500 copies.; 9.50 X 6 X 0.75 inches.

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NY 1993 Hardcovers Very Good in Not Issued jacket Anniversary Edition. 8vo-over 7?"-9?" tall. Signed by Author Limited issue of the 40th Anniversary edition. Limited to 500 ... numbered copies signed by Bradbury on the limitation page. Copy #361. New Foreword for this edition by Bradbury. Slipcase with gilt title. Minimally rubbed cloth covering the boards; Slipcase with dampstain on bottom edge of front panel and some spotting on the front at rear panels. Tight copy in Very Good condition in a Very Good slipcase. Image of actual book; not a stock photo. Read more Show Less

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Fahrenheit 451

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Overview

Internationally acclaimed with more than 5 million copies in print, Fahrenheit 451 is Ray Bradbury's classic novel of censorship and defiance, as resonant today as it was when it was first published nearly 50 years ago.

Guy Montag was a fireman whose job it was to start fires...

The system was simple. Everyone understood it. Books were for burning ... along with the houses in which they were hidden.

Guy Montag enjoyed his job. He had been a fireman for ten years, and he had never questioned the pleasure of the midnight runs nor the joy of watching pages consumed by flames... never questioned anything until he met a seventeen-year-old girl who told him of a past when people were not afraid.

Then he met a professor who told him of a future in which people could think... and Guy Montag suddenly realized what he had to do!

First published in 1953, Fahrenheit 451 is a classic novel set in the future when books forbidden by a totalitarian regime are burned. The hero, a book burner, suddenly discovers that books are flesh and blood ideas that cry out silently when put to the torch.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Fahrenheit 451 is set in a grim alternate-future setting ruled by a tyrannical government in which firemen as we understand them no longer exist: Here, firemen don't douse fires, they ignite them. And they do this specifically in homes that house the most evil of evils: books.

Books are illegal in Bradbury's world, but books are not what his fictional -- yet extremely plausible -- government fears: They fear the knowledge one pulls from books. Through the government's incessant preaching, the inhabitants of this place have come to loathe books and fear those who keep and attempt to read them. They see such people as eccentric, dangerous, and threatening to the tranquility of their state.

But one day a fireman named Montag meets a young girl who demonstrates to him the beauty of books, of knowledge, of conceiving and sharing ideas; she wakes him up, changing his life forever. When Montag's previously held ideology comes crashing down around him, he is forced to reconsider the meaning of his existence and the part he plays. After Montag discovers that "all isn't well with the world," he sets out to make things right.

A brilliant and frightening novel, Fahrenheit 451 is the classic narrative about censorship; utterly chilling in its implications, Ray Bradbury's masterwork captivates thousands of new readers each year. (Andrew LeCount)

From the Publisher
"Stephen Hoye's narration is perfectly matched to the subject matter: his tone is low and ominous, and his cadence shifts with the prose to ratchet up tension and suspense." —-Publishers Weekly Starred Audio Review
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780671872298
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster
  • Publication date: 10/1/1993
  • Edition description: 40TH ANNIVERSARY
  • Edition number: 40
  • Pages: 192
  • Product dimensions: 6.12 (w) x 9.33 (h) x 1.16 (d)

Meet the Author

Ray Bradbury

In a career spanning more than seventy years, Ray Bradbury, who died on June 5, 2011 at the age of 91, inspired generations of readers to dream, think, and create. A prolific author of hundreds of short stories and close to fifty books, as well as numerous poems, essays, operas, plays, teleplays, and screenplays, Bradbury was one of the most celebrated writers of our time. His groundbreaking works include Fahrenheit 451, The Martian Chronicles, The Illustrated Man, Dandelion Wine, and Something Wicked This Way Comes. He wrote the screen play for John Huston's classic film adaptation of Moby Dick, and was nominated for an Academy Award. He adapted sixty-five of his stories for television's The Ray Bradbury Theater, and won an Emmy for his teleplay of The Halloween Tree. He was the recipient of the 2000 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, the 2004 National Medal of Arts, and the 2007 Pulitzer Prize Special Citation, among many honors.

Throughout his life, Bradbury liked to recount the story of meeting a carnival magician, Mr. Electrico, in 1932. At the end of his performance Electrico reached out to the twelve-year-old Bradbury, touched the boy with his sword, and commanded, "Live forever!" Bradbury later said, "I decided that was the greatest idea I had ever heard. I started writing every day. I never stopped."

In a career spanning more than seventy years, Ray Bradbury, who died on June 5, 2011 at the age of 91, inspired generations of readers to dream, think, and create. A prolific author of hundreds of short stories and close to fifty books, as well as numerous poems, essays, operas, plays, teleplays, and screenplays, Bradbury was one of the most celebrated writers of our time. His groundbreaking works include Fahrenheit 451, The Martian Chronicles, The Illustrated Man, Dandelion Wine, and Something Wicked This Way Comes. He wrote the screen play for John Huston's classic film adaptation of Moby Dick, and was nominated for an Academy Award. He adapted sixty-five of his stories for television's The Ray Bradbury Theater, and won an Emmy for his teleplay of The Halloween Tree. He was the recipient of the 2000 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, the 2004 National Medal of Arts, and the 2007 Pulitzer Prize Special Citation, among many honors.

Throughout his life, Bradbury liked to recount the story of meeting a carnival magician, Mr. Electrico, in 1932. At the end of his performance Electrico reached out to the twelve-year-old Bradbury, touched the boy with his sword, and commanded, "Live forever!" Bradbury later said, "I decided that was the greatest idea I had ever heard. I started writing every day. I never stopped."

Biography

Ray Bradbury is one of those rare individuals whose writing has changed the way people think. His more than 500 published works -- short stories, novels, plays, screenplays, television scripts, and verse -- exemplify the American imagination at its most creative.

Once read, his words are never forgotten. His best-known and most beloved books -- The Martian Chronicles, The Illustrated Man, Fahrenheit 451, and Something Wicked This Way Comes -- are masterworks that readers carry with them over a lifetime. His timeless, constant appeal to audiences young and old has proven him to be one of the truly classic authors of the 20th Century -- and the 21st.

Ray Bradbury's work has been included in several Best American Short Story collections. He has been awarded the O. Henry Memorial Award, the Benjamin Franklin Award, the World Fantasy Award for Lifetime Achievement, the Grand Master Award from the Science Fiction Writers of America, and the PEN Center USA West Lifetime Achievement Award, among others. In recognition of his stature in the world of literature and the impact he has had on so many for so many years, Bradbury was awarded the National Book Foundation's 2000 Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters and the National Medal of Arts in 2004.

On the occasion of his 80th birthday in August 2000, Bradbury said, "The great fun in my life has been getting up every morning and rushing to the typewriter because some new idea has hit me. The feeling I have every day is very much the same as it was when I was twelve. In any event, here I am, eighty years old, feeling no different, full of a great sense of joy, and glad for the long life that has been allowed me. I have good plans for the next ten or twenty years, and I hope you'll come along."

Good To Know

In our exclusive interview with Bradbury, he shared some fascinating facts with us:

"I spent three years standing on a street corner, selling newspapers, making ten dollars a week. I did that job every day for three hours and the rest of the time I wrote because I was in love with writing. The answer to all writing, to any career for that matter, is love."

"I have been inspired by libraries and the magic they contain and the people that they represent."

"I hate all politics. I don't like either political party. One should not belong to them -- one should be an individual, standing in the middle. Anyone that belongs to a party stops thinking."

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    1. Also Known As:
      Leonard Douglas, William Elliott, Douglas Spaulding, Leonard Spaulding
      Ray Bradbury
    2. Hometown:
      Los Angeles, California
    1. Date of Birth:
      August 22, 1920
    2. Place of Birth:
      Waukegan, Illinois
    1. Education:
      Attended schools in Waukegan, Illinois, and Los Angeles, California
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

It was a pleasure to burn.

It was a special pleasure to see things eaten, to see things blackened and changed. With the brass nozzle in his fists, with this great python spitting its venomous kerosene upon the world, the blood pounded in his head, and his hands were the hands of some amazing conductor playing all the symphonies of blazing and burning to bring down the tatters and charcoal ruins of history. With his symbolic helmet numbered 451 on his stolid head, and his eyes all orange flame with the thought of what came next, he flicked the igniter and the house jumped up in a gorging fire that burned the evening sky red and yellow and black. He strode in a swarm of fireflies. He wanted above all, like the old joke, to shove a marshmallow on a stick in the furnace, while the flapping pigeon-winged books died on the porch and lawn of the house. While the books went up in sparkling whirls and blew away on a wind turned dark with burning.

Montag grinned the fierce grin of all men singed and driven back by flame.

He knew that when he returned to the firehouse, he might wink at himself, a minstrel man, burnt-corked, in the mirror. Later, going to sleep, he would feel the fiery smile still gripped by his face muscles, in the dark. It never went away, that smile, it never ever went away, as long as he remembered.

He hung up his black beetle-colored helmet and shined it; he hung his flameproof jacket neatly; he showered luxuriously, and then, whistling, hands in pockets, walked across the upper floor of the fire station and fell down the hole. At the last moment, when disaster seemed positive, he pulled his hands from his pockets and broke his fall by graspingthe golden pole. He slid to a squeaking halt, the heels one inch from the concrete floor downstairs.

He walked out of the fire station and along the midnight street toward the subway where the silent air-propelled train slid soundlessly down its lubricated flue in the earth and let him out with a great puff of warm air onto the cream-tiled escalator rising to the suburb.

Whistling, he let the escalator waft him into the still night air. He walked toward the corner, thinking little at all about nothing in particular. Before he reached the corner, however, he slowed as if a wind had sprung up from nowhere, as if someone had called his name.

The last few nights he had had the most uncertain feelings about the sidewalk just around the corner here, moving in the starlight toward his house. He had felt that a moment prior to his making the turn, someone had been there. The air seemed charged with a special calm as if someone had waited there, quietly, and only a moment before he came, simply turned to a shadow and let him through. Perhaps his nose detected a faint perfume, perhaps the skin on the backs of his hands, on his face, felt the temperature rise at this one spot where a person’s standing might raise the immediate atmosphere ten degrees for an instant. There was no understanding it. Each time he made the turn, he saw only the white, unused, buckling sidewalk, with perhaps, on one night, something vanishing swiftly across a lawn before he could focus his eyes or speak.

But now tonight, he slowed almost to a stop. His inner mind, reaching out to turn the corner for him, had heard the faintest whisper. Breathing? Or was the atmosphere compressed merely by someone standing very quietly there, waiting?

He turned the corner.

The autumn leaves blew over the moonlit pavement in such a way as to make the girl who was moving there seem fixed to a sliding walk, letting the motion of the wind and the leaves carry her forward. Her head was half bent to watch her shoes stir the circling leaves. Her face was slender and milk-white, and in it was a kind of gentle hunger that touched over everything with tireless curiosity. It was a look, almost, of pale surprise; the dark eyes were so fixed to the world that no move escaped them. Her dress was white and it whispered. He almost thought he heard the motion of her hands as she walked, and the infinitely small sound now, the white stir of her face turning when she discovered she was a moment away from a man who stood in the middle of the pavement waiting.

The trees overhead made a great sound of letting down their dry rain. The girl stopped and looked as if she might pull back in surprise, but instead stood regarding Montag with eyes so dark and shining and alive that he felt he had said something quite wonderful. But he knew his mouth had only moved to say hello, and then when she seemed hypnotized by the salamander on his arm and the phoenix disc on his chest, he spoke again.

“Of course,” he said, “you’re our new neighbor, aren’t you?”

“And you must be”—she raised her eyes from his professional symbols “—the fireman.” Her voice trailed off.

“How oddly you say that.”

“I’d—I’d have known it with my eyes shut,” she said, slowly.

“What—the smell of kerosene? My wife always complains,” he laughed. “You never wash it off completely.”

“No, you don’t,” she said, in awe.

He felt she was walking in a circle about him, turning him end for end, shaking him quietly, and emptying his pockets, without once moving herself.

“Kerosene,” he said, because the silence had lengthened, “is nothing but perfume to me.”

“Does it seem like that, really?”

“Of course. Why not?”

She gave herself time to think of it. “I don’t know.” She turned to face the sidewalk going toward their homes. “Do you mind if I walk back with you? I’m Clarisse McClellan.”

“Clarisse. Guy Montag. Come along. What are you doing out so late wandering around? How old are you?”

They walked in the warm-cool blowing night on the silvered pavement and there was the faintest breath of fresh apricots and strawberries in the air, and he looked around and realized this was quite impossible, so late in the year.

There was only the girl walking with him now, her face bright as snow in the moonlight, and he knew she was working his questions around, seeking the best answers she could possibly give.

“Well,” she said, “I’m seventeen and I’m crazy. My uncle says the two always go together. When people ask your age, he said, always say seventeen and insane. Isn’t this a nice time of night to walk? I like to smell things and look at things, and sometimes stay up all night, walking, and watch the sun rise.”

They walked on again in silence and finally she said, thoughtfully, “You know, I’m not afraid of you at all.”

He was surprised. “Why should you be?”

“So many people are. Afraid of firemen, I mean. But you’re just a man, after all . . .”

He saw himself in her eyes, suspended in two shining drops of bright water, himself dark and tiny, in fine detail, the lines about his mouth, everything there, as if her eyes were two miraculous bits of violet amber that might capture and hold him intact. Her face, turned to him now, was fragile milk crystal with a soft and constant light in it. It was not the hysterical light of electricity but—what? But the strangely comfortable and rare and gently flattering light of the candle. One time, as a child, in a power failure, his mother had found and lit a last candle and there had been a brief hour of rediscovery, of such illumination that space lost its vast dimensions and grew comfortably around them, and they, mother and son, alone, transformed, hoping that the power might not come on again too soon . . .

And then Clarisse McClellan said:

“Do you mind if I ask? How long’ve you worked at being a fireman?”

“Since I was twenty, ten years ago.”

“Do you ever read any of the books you burn?”

He laughed. “That’s against the law!”

“Oh. Of course.”

“It’s fine work. Monday burn Millay, Wednesday Whitman, Friday Faulkner, burn ’em to ashes, then burn the ashes. That’s our official slogan.”

They walked still farther and the girl said, “Is it true that long ago firemen put fires out instead of going to start them?”

“No. Houses have always been fireproof, take my word for it.”

“Strange. I heard once that a long time ago houses used to burn by accident and they needed firemen to stop the flames.”

He laughed.

She glanced quickly over. “Why are you laughing?”

“I don’t know.” He started to laugh again and stopped. “Why?”

“You laugh when I haven’t been funny and you answer right off. You never stop to think what I’ve asked you.”

He stopped walking. “You are an odd one,” he said, looking at her. “Haven’t you any respect?”

“I don’t mean to be insulting. It’s just I love to watch people too much, I guess.”

“Well, doesn’t this mean anything to you?” He tapped the numerals 451 stitched on his char-colored sleeve.

“Yes,” she whispered. She increased her pace. “Have you ever watched the jet cars racing on the boulevards down that way?”

“You’re changing the subject!”

“I sometimes think drivers don’t know what grass is, or flowers, because they never see them slowly,” she said. “If you showed a driver a green blur, Oh yes! he’d say, that’s grass! A pink blur! That’s a rose garden! White blurs are houses. Brown blurs are cows. My uncle drove slowly on a highway once. He drove forty miles an hour and they jailed him for two days. Isn’t that funny, and sad, too?”

“You think too many things,” said Montag, uneasily.

“I rarely watch the ‘parlor walls’ or go to races or Fun Parks. So I’ve lots of time for crazy thoughts, I guess. Have you seen the two hundred-foot-long billboards in the country beyond town? Did you know that once billboards were only twenty feet long? But cars started rushing by so quickly they had to stretch the advertising out so it would last.”

“I didn’t know that!” Montag laughed abruptly.

“Bet I know something else you don’t. There’s dew on the grass in the morning.”

He suddenly couldn’t remember if he had known this or not, and it made him quite irritable.

“And if you look”—she nodded at the sky—“there’s a man in the moon.”

He hadn’t looked for a long time.

They walked the rest of the way in silence, hers thoughtful, his a kind of clenching and uncomfortable silence in which he shot her accusing glances. When they reached her house all its lights were blazing.

“What’s going on?” Montag had rarely seen that many house lights.

“Oh, just my mother and father and uncle sitting around, talking. It’s like being a pedestrian, only rarer. My uncle was arrested another time—did I tell you?—for being a pedestrian. Oh, we’re most peculiar.”

“But what do you talk about?”

She laughed at this. “Good night!” She started up her walk. Then she seemed to remember something and came back to look at him with wonder and curiosity. “Are you happy?” she said.

“Am I what?” he cried.

But she was gone—running in the moonlight. Her front door shut gently.

“Happy! Of all the nonsense.”

He stopped laughing.

He put his hand into the glove hole of his front door and let it know his touch. The front door slid open.

Of course I’m happy. What does she think? I’m not? he asked the quiet rooms. He stood looking up at the ventilator grille in the hall and suddenly remembered that something lay hidden behind the grille, something that seemed to peer down at him now. He moved his eyes quickly away.

What a strange meeting on a strange night. He remembered nothing like it save one afternoon a year ago when he had met an old man in the park and they had talked . . .

Montag shook his head. He looked at a blank wall. The girl’s face was there, really quite beautiful in memory: astonishing, in fact. She had a very thin face like the dial of a small clock seen faintly in a dark room in the middle of a night when you waken to see the time and see the clock telling you the hour and the minute and the second, with a white silence and a glowing, all certainty and knowing what it had to tell of the night passing swiftly on toward further darknesses, but moving also toward a new sun.

“What?” asked Montag of the other self, the subconscious idiot that ran babbling at times, quite independent of will, habit, and conscience.

He glanced back at the wall. How like a mirror, too, her face. Impossible; for how many people did you know who refracted your own light to you? People were more often—he searched for a simile, found one in his work—torches, blazing away until they whiffed out. How rarely did other people’s faces take of you and throw back to you your own expression, your own innermost trembling thought?

What incredible power of identification the girl had; she was like the eager watcher of a marionette show, anticipating each flicker of an eyelid, each gesture of his hand, each flick of a finger, the moment before it began. How long had they walked together? Three minutes? Five? Yet how large that time seemed now. How immense a figure she was on the stage before him; what a shadow she threw on the wall with her slender body! He felt that if his eye itched, she might blink. And if the muscles of his jaws stretched imperceptibly, she would yawn long before he would.

Why, he thought, now that I think of it, she almost seemed to be waiting for me there, in the street, so damned late at night . . .

He opened the bedroom door.

It was like coming into the cold marbled room of a mausoleum after the moon has set. Complete darkness, not a hint of the silver world outside, the windows tightly shut, the chamber a tomb world where no sound from the great city could penetrate. The room was not empty.

He listened.

The little mosquito-delicate dancing hum in the


Copyright 1987 by Ray Bradbury
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 452 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(233)

4 Star

(110)

3 Star

(59)

2 Star

(17)

1 Star

(33)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 453 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2012

    Fahrenheit 451: don't read it just for the plot

    I enjoyed Fahrenheit 451. True, it's hard to understand sometimes. I think what really made this book stand out to me was not the plot, but the motifs and symbolism. If you read this book just for plot, I will tell you that you will be confused and disappointed. The glory of this book is in how Ray Bradbury uses symbolism and motif. When I say motif, I mean like a theme. Like fire and water. Bradbury often uses fire to represent ignorance in the book, and water to represent knowledge. Or masks and mirrors. Bradbury will talk about some of the characters (usually the ones who are following the crowd, like the Montags) having "masks," while other characters (those who are different like Clarisse and Faber) are described as with mirrors.
    If you want to really read this book, I recommend getting one of those literature guides to read along with Fahrenheit. If you know the symbolism behind the book, you will enjoy it much more.

    21 out of 24 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 6, 2012

    Outstanding

    God bless you Ray. You gave us a vision of what might happen and so much of what you said did. Traffic cameras, the death of real conversation, the creation of an electronic family and social media. You will be greatly missed.

    18 out of 22 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2012

    Be A bit confusing but an iver all good book A but cinfusing but an overall good book

    I am in 7th grade but i still found this book very interestinh

    11 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 31, 2011

    One of literature's best!

    Written 50 years ago but still rings true in describing today's culture if you look at the themes metaphors,symbols and the message he's trying to tell. I think people who label it boring are just reading it literally and expecting a science fiction thriller.

    11 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2012

    Overpriced

    Had to read the book for school , took a LONG time for the book to get interesting

    7 out of 30 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2011

    CLASSIC

    Nice

    7 out of 25 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2013

    This book was required to be read by my Honors English 9 class.

    This book was required to be read by my Honors English 9 class. Being 14 years old and reading this book I found myself confused throughout the whole book. There was so much symbolism that I didn't understand and details that I wasn't sure why they mattered. I stared to understand the book when my teacher was going through text portions with us and explaining it to us. 

    Every time I picked this book up I found my eyelids getting heavy and the text going right through me, and I am generally a great reader. 

    I understand Ray Bradbury is legendary and whatever and this book is "classic" but if this book wasn't being shoved down my throat by my district and my grade didn't depend on it, I would have never made it past page one.

    6 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2012

    INCREDIBLE BOOK!

    A little bit of a hard read, but if you liked 1984 or other dystopian novels, this will be great for you! Powerful, thoughtful, and amazing. My only point is that the ending wasn't as conclusive as I would've liked but still great.

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2012

    Boring!

    This book was justnplain boring and stupid. I didnt get it at all, the plot was stipid and there was Too much detail! The way bradbury writes is confusing. I would not recomend this to ANYONE! I give it 0stars but i have to give it 1.

    6 out of 53 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 12, 2012

    Great book

    I feel bad for all of the people who said this book was stupid. Not to offend anyone, but if you really get it and understand what it's saying then it has a really deep message. I get how its hard to understand because there are so many metaphors but if you think about it it is so much like our world today and this guy wrote it like 50 years ago. Just the fact that i am writing this review on an ereader and not actually having a conversation depicts what he wrote.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2012

    Meh...

    My class had to read this book last year in 9th grade. I was one of the few who didn't cheat off of sparknotes. The plot was pretty original and creative. What I hated was his writing style. It was too overly descriptive in need of more dialogue. Also, the ending is too rushed and didn't make much sense. Sorry, but the most I can give this book is 2 stars. This book is selling on the sole fact that he just died.

    4 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 11, 2014

    A classic with modern implications

    I never read Fahrenheit 451 during the 60' or 70's but I'd heard of the book. As I read it now as a senior citizen, I saw a lot of similarities in issues that are current nowadays. As the featured book of the Big Read, the book sparked very spirited and book discussions and aevery discussion took a different path on varied topics brought up.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 7, 2012

    Highly Recommended!!

    This book is a wake up call to life as we know it. Taking place in the future it not only exploits the endless possibilities of what would happen in the future if we choose to neglect our: opinions and emotions but it also shines light on the endless fight, that man refuses to give up on in order, to resurrect from it's mistakes. Truly honoring one of the best scientific writer's of all time. Bradbury simply tells the story of Montag a firefighter who unlike the rest questions his very sanity after meeting a young girl Clarrisse unlike the rest. With the countless allusions, this book adopts broad time periods from authors from the victorian era and even ancient myths back in egyptian times. In the future where books are banned and roaring tv's take there place, people just stand in line and do as they are told the regular robots and people who aren't so adhesive to the rules are frowned upon and might even turn up dead. Teens kill each other in intentional car acciendents, people overdose on pills only to have their stomachs vaccumed out leaving them to do it over and over again, women who have constant abortions and husbands, and a war that seems to take place throughout the world and within the soceity.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2001

    Bad Book

    F451 was a really interesting book the first 60 pages that I read. After that the book was just a bad read. The ending was horrible; it didn't explain what happened after the chase of Montag. What about Clarisse? She was the 'object' that made the beginning the most interesting. F451 was really just a waste of my reading time, and I wouldn't recommend it to anyone reading on their own time.

    3 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 6, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Ray Bradbury opens the world of reading to the reader in a world

    Ray Bradbury opens the world of reading to the reader in a world that leaves it undiscovered. When reading it for the first time, in eighth grade, I was astonished and allured by the premise of the book, that being books. A book about books! At the age of 13 and 14, some scenes were hard to picture reading it, but that's the great thing about reading; if you don't understand it the first time, you go back and read it again. Since then, I've currently have read the book for the third time and clearly understand what happened to Montag's wife during the night. Looking back I loved it then and love it even more now because I went back to see the changes and stagnant feelings that socially encompass our world. Fahrenheit 451 reflects our reality like a mirror, just like Clarisse does to Montag, and we have Ray to thank for that. I'll never read an e-book because I know, and I see it my classmates disdain, that I will soon be desensitized towards books in print. What's more personal, warm and inviting than a nice, old and wrinkly book? 

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2014

    Omg best book

    This book is great for reports or even just casual reading. Total Must Read!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2014

    Never gets old

    6 words. It was a pleasure to burn. (And read over and over again)

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 19, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    First, I would like to state that I really like this book, but a

    First, I would like to state that I really like this book, but also fear that what was written as fiction predicting reality is coming true in more ways than one. I would also like to state that I want to write about the book and then off the book, if you can say that.

    The main character, Guy Montag, is a fireman, but instead of putting fires out, he starts them for one purpose, to burn those objects that are feared to cause negative emotion, books. While the books are not really disallowed by the government, they are objects that deemed dangerous and those who harbor them. At first it seems that it is another despotic novel where the characters are fearful by what government or as we have seen, "Big Brother" in 1984, is enforcing as a rule of law, but it is even more than that. As we find out, the books can be burned in more ways then one and that is where the object off the book, the topic and how it came to live even more interesting than even the novel itself, which I will touch in a little bit. What we also see, what Ray Bradbury talks about is in house parlors. The shows where the viewer interacts with the show, so as per what we have seen recently, reality shows, but with interactive aspect to them. The viewer is not just watching the shows, but also being fed information that they want them to think, feel and live by. Then of course the sleeping "brainwashing" and so it goes on and on, on the daily 24 hour basis. It is interesting that while reading this book, we find out more about what our society is doing now, while reading something that was written a few decades before. The books didn't just disappear and did not get outlawed, but the viewer became abscessed with the "family" in the parlor shows. The books started to be less and less paid attention to, hence the opportune moment for the government to step in and put the viewer in front of the screen and away from the books. Government seized the moment when people distanced themselves from reading and educating themselves, therefore fallen prey to whatever they were being fed via TV shows. Then of course as we find out everything else follows.

    I like an interesting point and concept what made this book possible and grow to its fruition. In this version of the novel, we have "Fahrenheit 451", but also explanations, praises and positive critique by various writers. We also have explanation by the author himself. Why the book is called "Fahrenheit 451", what and when it gained such clever title and why the author decided to write about this topic. One of the very interesting points here is that there is more than one way to "burn" the books. One is the physically burn them in the fire, as Stalin, Hitler and many other tyrants have done. There is also another way to do it, as Ray Bradbury points out. If you are not reading the books, changing their content, taking out words and even characters to "please" the general public or as Ray points out, suit the needs to minorities, who want something changed, therefore killing and burning the very meaning of the book itself, literary burning it.

    The concept, the title, the meaning behind this novel, is absolutely genius. It is in the same genre and level of well written novels, as "We", "Brave New World", "1984" and another one, which I have not yet read, but what actually ignited (no punt intended) the idea for Mr Bradbury to write this novel, "Darkness at Noon".

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2012

    Am I Missing Something?

    This was one of the worst books I have ever read. I don't know if its because I was too young to understand it, but I could barely get through it. If it hadnt been a book for school I never would have finished it. It was confusing and unrelatable, the characters didn't make me want to keep reading, and the plot seemed flat. It got good reviews though so I guess I'll reread it sometime.

    2 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2012

    Omg

    So hard to follow and understand not a very good read

    2 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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