Failed States: The Abuse of Power and the Assault on Democracy

Overview

"It's hard to imagine any American reading this book and not seeing his country in a new, and deeply troubling, light."—The New York Times Book Review

The United States has repeatedly asserted its right to intervene militarily against "failed states" around the globe. In this much-anticipated follow-up to his international bestseller Hegemony or Survival, Noam Chomsky turns the tables, showing how the United States itself shares features with other failed states—suffering from a...

See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$11.05
BN.com price
(Save 35%)$17.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (31) from $1.99   
  • New (8) from $9.06   
  • Used (23) from $1.99   
Failed States: The Abuse of Power and the Assault on Democracy

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price

Overview

"It's hard to imagine any American reading this book and not seeing his country in a new, and deeply troubling, light."—The New York Times Book Review

The United States has repeatedly asserted its right to intervene militarily against "failed states" around the globe. In this much-anticipated follow-up to his international bestseller Hegemony or Survival, Noam Chomsky turns the tables, showing how the United States itself shares features with other failed states—suffering from a severe "democratic deficit," eschewing domestic and international law, and adopting policies that increasingly endanger its own citizens and the world. Exploring the latest developments in U.S. foreign and domestic policy, Chomsky reveals Washington's plans to further militarize the planet, greatly increasing the risks of nuclear war. He also assesses the dangerous consequences of the occupation of Iraq; documents Washington's self-exemption from international norms, including the Geneva conventions and the Kyoto Protocol; and examines how the U.S. electoral system is designed to eliminate genuine political alternatives, impeding any meaningful democracy.

Forceful, lucid, and meticulously documented, Failed States offers a comprehensive analysis of a global superpower that has long claimed the right to reshape other nations while its own democratic institutions are in severe crisis. Systematically dismantling the United States' pretense of being the world's arbiter of democracy, Failed States is Chomsky's most focused—and urgent—critique to date.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Noam Chomsky does not take words lightly. The MIT linguistics professor examines government statements with special care. The man recently voted "the world's number one intellectual" notes, for example, that the United States has repeatedly asserted its right to intervene against "failed states" around the globe. In Failed States: America, he turns the phrase back on the Bush administration, charging that the United States of today is a "failed state" and a danger to its own people and the world. This stand-alone sequel to Hegemony or Survival continues his critique of American foreign policy and domestic practices.
From the Publisher
“Chomsky is a global phenomenon . . . perhaps the most widely read voice on

foreign policy on the planet.”—The New York Times Book Review

Jonathan Freedland
It's hard to imagine any American reading this book and not seeing his country in a new, and deeply troubling, light.
— The New York Times
Library Journal
A failed state, argues Chomsky, ignores international law and the need to protect its citizens. Guess what country fits the bill? Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780805082845
  • Publisher: Holt, Henry & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 4/3/2007
  • Series: American Empire Project Series
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 400,203
  • Product dimensions: 5.43 (w) x 8.16 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Noam Chomsky is the author of numerous bestselling political works, including Hegemony or Survival, Failed States, Imperial Ambitions and What We Say Goes. A professor of linguistics and philosophy at MIT, he is widely credited with having revolutionized modern linguistics. He lives outside Boston, Massachusetts.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Preface

The selection of issues that should rank high on the agenda of concern for human welfare and rights is, naturally, a subjective matter. But there are a few choices that seem unavoidable, because they bear so directly on the prospects for decent survival. Among them are at least these three: nuclear war, environmental disaster, and the fact that the government of the world's leading power is acting in ways that increase the likelihood of these catastrophes. It is important to stress the government, because the population, not surprisingly, does not agree. That brings up a fourth issue that should deeply concern Americans, and the world: the sharp divide between public opinion and public policy, one of the reasons for the fear, which cannot casually be put aside, that "the American 'system' as a whole is in real trouble—that it is heading in a direction that spells the end of its historic values [of] equality, liberty, and meaningful democracy."1

The "system" is coming to have some of the features of failed states, to adopt a currently fashionable notion that is conventionally applied to states regarded as potential threats to our security (like Iraq) or as needing our intervention to rescue the population from severe internal threats (like Haiti). Though the concept is recognized to be "frustratingly imprecise," some of the primary characteristics of failed states can be identified. One is their inability or unwillingness to protect their citizens from violence and perhaps even destruction. Another is their tendency to regard themselves as beyond the reach of domestic or international law, and hence free to carry out aggression and violence. And if they have democratic forms, they suffer from a serious "democratic deficit" that deprives their formal democratic institutions of real substance.2

Among the hardest tasks that anyone can undertake, and one of the most important, is to look honestly in the mirror. If we allow ourselves to do so, we should have little difficulty in finding the characteristics of "failed states" right at home. That recognition of reality should be deeply troubling to those who care about their countries and future generations. "Countries," plural, because of the enormous reach of US power, but also because the threats are not localized in space or time.

The first half of this book is devoted mostly to the increasing threat of destruction caused by US state power, in violation of international law, a topic of particular concern for citizens of the world dominant power, however one assesses the relevant threats. The second half is concerned primarily with democratic institutions, how they are conceived in the elite culture and how they perform in reality, both in "promoting democracy" abroad and shaping it at home.

The issues are closely interlinked, and arise in several contexts. In discussing them, to save excessive footnoting I will omit sources when they can easily be found in recent books of mine.3

Copyright © 2006 by Harry Chomsky, as Trustee of Chomsky Grandchildren Nominee Trust

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 14 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2012

    Essential Reading

    With cold hard facts and revealing insights, Chomsky destoys the illusion and sophistry of the corporate media and the ruling elite while casting the US as the most "failed" state on earth. A must-read for any person of conscience.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2007

    Excellence Unmatched.

    Chomsky delivers another sobering insight to US Foreign Policy of yesteryear and the continuing path we stray. He delivers it eloquently and concise and engulfs the reader with factual accounts of global injustice suffered at the hands of the worlds most dominate rouge state. Chomsky accounts details of social injustice and highlights inconsistencies with great mastery. I found this read to be rather insightful and alarming, and I appreciate the great efforts put forth by Chomsky to create such a forthright and honest portrayal of American Foreign policy.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2006

    An Appeal to Reason

    Noam Chomsky is considered the world's leading intellectual for good reason: he's incredibly well-informed, utilizes logic and strong analysis to make arguments, uses evidence to support his claims, and is not dogmatic in his views. His latest book, 'Failed States', only solidifies even further his solid reputation in the world of academia. 'Failed States' effectively makes the argument that judging by the criteria of failed states, the United States seems to fit the bill. Chomsky makes three primary claims: U.S. foreign policy increases the threat of global terrorism through acts of imperialism and hegemony, the U.S. exempts itself from international law and treaties and treats the UN with utter contempt, and undermines democratic institutions domestically through the corporatization of the media. My only complaint lies with Chomsky's writing style. Sometimes he's hard to follow and at times a little dense. This is only a minor quibble in an otherwise great (and important) read. For those looking for a comprehensive anaylsis on U.S. foreign policy, 'Failed States' will certainly satisfy. Chomsky's views are only outside of the mainstream among America's political elite: many (possibly a majority) around the world share his perspective on U.S. policy. Highly recommended!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 7, 2006

    Useful study of the US state's activities

    In this brilliant new book, Chomsky examines the US state and its credentials as a democracy. He concludes that it abuses its power and assaults democracy at home and abroad. He shows how it regards itself as `beyond the reach of domestic or international law, and hence free to carry out aggression and violence¿. He looks at `the increasing threat of destruction caused by US state power¿, when it opposes a Palestinian state, supports Israel¿s illegal occupation and settlements, illegally attacks Yugoslavia, Afghanistan and Iraq, and threatens Iran and the DPRK. The US state asserts that it alone has the right to attack whoever it wants. In response, the UN High-level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change concluded in 2004, ¿the risk to the global order and the norm of nonintervention on which it continues to be based is simply too great for the legality of unilateral preventive action, as distinct from collectively endorsed action, to be accepted.¿ The US state also insists that it alone has the right to develop nuclear weapons. So in November 2004, it cast the sole vote against the proposed Fission Material Cutoff Treaty. 147 states voted for it and two abstained, Israel and Britain. Blair¿s representative ludicrously claimed that the resolution ¿divided the international community at a time when progress should be a prime objective.¿ Chomsky quotes some surprising people who recognise that other nations have the right to develop nuclear power and nuclear deterrents. Henry Kissinger, when his friend the Shah was misruling Iran, said, the ¿introduction of nuclear power will both provide for the growing needs of Iran¿s economy and free remaining oil reserves for export or conversion to petrochemicals.¿ South Korea¿s President Roh Moo-hyun said, ¿North Korea professes that nuclear capabilities are a deterrent for defending itself from external aggression. In this particular case it is true and undeniable that there is a considerable element of rationality in North Korea¿s claim.¿ As in all Chomsky¿s best books, he deploys an extraordinary range of references, brilliantly exposing official lies. Once again, he has produced a timely and useful book.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2006

    A Literary Disaster

    Is America a failed state? It sure is hard to make that argument! Why do we try to exert our influence on so-called failed states? Its simply in our interest of preservation and prosperity. Show me another nation that goes to the lengths as this country to protect its citizens. Its hard for some left-wing citizens to understand that there are organizations and nations that want to kill Americans. It is within our right to exert our influence in whatever manner will ensure our safety, security, and prosperity and prevent this from happening. Ol Norm forgot to mention religious extremism as a characteristic of a failed state...so if you are into bashing your own country, then this garbage is for you.

    1 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2006

    This book is garbage

    More liberal drek. Another book from a so-called intellectual that claims everything the US does is wrong, and will eventually lead to our downfall. Its interesting how everyone can condemn our actions, but cannot live without our money and support. Remember liberals, you are the minority for a good reason. If you don't like it, you can leave. How one can say America is a failed state is an absurd statement. Sometimes, we are not the ones to blame...why is that so hard to accept?

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2008

    Fascinating Truth

    Fact based reflection on US foreign policy. As with all his works, Chomsky once again, bases his work on facts not widely reported, but not too difficult to verify, hence making him one of the few people who cant be labeled a conspiracy theorist. His reflections on American democracy and the dangers it poses to others and more so it self are a fresh and welcome contradiction to what the TV will tell you. Read this and whether you agree or disagree with him, you will admire his critical view on facts and fiction.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2006

    Objective thought before conveyance

    'A Literary Disaster' and 'This Book is Garbage' (Yes, those have become your names) clearly are not well-read and don't have the slightest notion of critical literary or political analysis. You gave no response, merely simplistic, uninformed opinion on defensive terms. It saddens me that I live amongst such people. Check that data on liberals(whatever that means) being a minority - you are mistaken...

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 6, 2006

    Highly recommended.

    Failed States: The Abuse Of Power And The Assault On Democracy is a stinging criticism of American arrogance and its failures to live up to the spirit of democracy by esteemed linguistics and philosophy president Noam Chomsky. In an era where the United States repeatedly asserts its right to use military might against 'failed states' around the globe, Noam Chomsky reveals the dangerous features that the United States shares with other failed states - nations that are unable or unwilling 'to protect their citizens from violence and perhaps even destruction' and 'regard themselves as beyond the reach of domestic or international law.' Failed states, Chomsky observes, are characterized by a 'democratic deficit' that leeches any real democratic substance from their governmental institutions. Chomsky then scrutinizes how the United States electoral system is designed to eliminate genuine political alternatives, crippling meaningful democracy how Washington increasingly exempts itself from international norms how American efforts to militarize the planet increase the risk of nuclear war and how repeated sound bites, so effective to the jaded American public, are much less useful when repeated to Iraqi citizens who belong to a society that is more demanding of open and thorough discussion. Highly recommended.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 14 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)