Failure Is Impossible: The Story of Susan B. Anthony

Failure Is Impossible: The Story of Susan B. Anthony

5.0 1
by Lisa Frederkisen Bohannon
     
 
Born in 1820. Susan B. Anthony was brought up in a rural Quaker community, where she learned the value of education and the belief that all people should be treated with respect and dignity. As a young woman. Anthony decided to work toward improving American society. Initially, she joined the fight against alcoholic beverages, but soon grew disillusioned with the

Overview

Born in 1820. Susan B. Anthony was brought up in a rural Quaker community, where she learned the value of education and the belief that all people should be treated with respect and dignity. As a young woman. Anthony decided to work toward improving American society. Initially, she joined the fight against alcoholic beverages, but soon grew disillusioned with the temperance movement because, although women were the heart, soul, and spine of the organization, they were forbidden from speaking at meetings and often went unrecognized for their contributions. Anthony's experience with the temperance movement, however, led to her life's work. Soon she had joined with Lucy Stone, Lucretia Mott, and, most importantly, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, to spearhead the fight for women's rights. Focusing most of her efforts on winning women the right to vote. Anthony worked tirelessly to remove the stigma of second-class citizenship from the nation's women. Today, Susan B. Anthony is recognized as one of the most important leaders of the women's equality movement. Young readers interested in women's history, or in discovering how the human rights promised in the Declaration of Independence were gradually extended to all citizens, will want to read Failure is Impossible: The Story of Susan B. Anthony.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Born into a nurturing and hard-working Quaker family, Anthony learned to value education and to treat all people with dignity and respect. Swept into the campaign to ban alcohol in an attempt to improve social conditions in America, Susan became disenchanted when she saw that women—who were the heart and soul of the clergy-dominated movement—were denied a voice and a vote at temperance conventions. The experience, however, set the stage for her life-long struggle for women's equality. This concise biography, which takes its title from the reformer's own words, conveys a sense of Anthony's indefatigable spirit and boundless energy. It illuminates the times in which she lived and demonstrates the interrelationship of the temperance, abolitionist and women's suffrage movements. Each chapter contains excerpts from primary source material including letters, diaries and speeches that provide the reader with a glimpse at Anthony's relationships with Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucy Stone and Lucretia Mott, among others. The quotes are referenced in a source list which is accompanied by a bibliography and list of related web sites. Part of the "Feminist Voices" series. 2001, Morgan Reynolds, $20.95. Ages 10 up. Reviewer:Ellen R. Braaf
VOYA
This is a multi-book review that addresses three volumes from a series, Feminist Voices, that explores the lives of preeminent feminists. Susan B. Anthony, Carrie Chapman Catt, and Gloria Steinem each grew up in families supportive of their education and individuality. Unlike other women of their generations, they were encouraged to learn, provide for themselves, and fight for their beliefs. Devoting their lives to the cause of women, they affected U.S. history through determination, persistence, and faith. Each biographer describes the time and place in which the subject lived, providing a glimpse at the mitigating factors that led each into feminism. In this way, the reader sees how Elizabeth Cady Stanton influenced Anthony and understands that both in turn inspired Catt, who eventually sees the passage of the nineteenth amendment. Steinem, although not connected at all to her predecessors, was certainly influenced by their work. In all three biographies, the authors explore other social issues that each woman valued, providing a broader scope for their beliefs and drive. Anthony championed temperance and abolition, Catt supported international women's rights, and Steinem backed civil rights. Although the choppy writing and quick subject changes are distracting, these biographies provide concise information about important American women, and detail history that is often abbreviated. Bibliographies, Web sites, and illustrations enhance this series that also includes portrayals of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Victoria Woodhull. Perhaps overlooked are other modern feminists such as Betty Friedan. Index. Illus. Source Notes. VOYA CODES: 3Q 2P M J (Readable without serious defects; For the YAwith a special interest in the subject; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9). 2002, Morgan Reynolds, 112p. PLB
— Jessica Mize
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 6-9-An account of the suffragist's life from her childhood to her death in 1906. Growing up in a large Quaker family during the early part of the 1800s, Anthony assisted her mother with the hard work of running a household. Fortunately, her father strongly believed in equality for women, even starting his own school for his children when the district teacher refused to teach long division to girls. Advanced education and family support enabled Anthony to later lead in the social battles of the day; she tirelessly campaigned for temperance and equal rights for African Americans and women, faced down mobs, and charmed reporters who had wanted to dislike her. Bohannon weaves interesting social detail into her account with mention of bankruptcy, religion, household chores, wages, travel conditions, and convention etiquette. Naturally, there are accounts of collaboration with the important people of the time, from Frederick Douglass to Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Mrs. Horace Greeley (much to Mr. Greeley's chagrin). The author suggests that intelligence and energy persistently applied really do mean "failure is impossible." Black-and-white photographs (primarily portraits) and reproductions are scattered throughout. Readers will find even more detail and illustrations in Barbara Weisberg's Susan B. Anthony (Chelsea, 1988).-Cindy Darling Codell, Clark Middle School, Winchester, KY Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781883846770
Publisher:
Morgan Reynolds, Incorporated
Publication date:
10/28/2001
Series:
Feminist Voices Series
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
112
Product dimensions:
5.80(w) x 8.72(h) x 0.49(d)
Age Range:
10 - 13 Years

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Failure Is Impossible: The Story of Susan B. Anthony 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am currently a student, and this book has helped me tremendously throughout our studies of US History. I found this book helped me in many projects and reports, because it covered so much information about Susan B. Anthony, yet it was easy to read, unlike other biographies I have read.