Failure To Thrive & Pediatric Undernutrition: A Transdisciplinary Approach

Overview

Brimming with assessment and intervention techniques, this exhaustive resource discusses the medical and developmental consequences of pediatric undernutrition. The authors stress the importance of interdisciplinary teamwork and service coordination in dealing with a range of nutrition and feeding issues, from medical care and child development to community planning and advocacy. This comprehensive volume provides coverage of the numerous difficulties associated with inadequate nutrition in children younger than ...
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Overview

Brimming with assessment and intervention techniques, this exhaustive resource discusses the medical and developmental consequences of pediatric undernutrition. The authors stress the importance of interdisciplinary teamwork and service coordination in dealing with a range of nutrition and feeding issues, from medical care and child development to community planning and advocacy. This comprehensive volume provides coverage of the numerous difficulties associated with inadequate nutrition in children younger than age 3, including developmental delays, medical conditions that impair growth, and cognitive deficits.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Jeffery A. Wright, MD (University of Washington School of Medicine)
Description: An outstanding group of experts in the field of pediatric under nutrition has been assembled. This comprehensive review looks at the complex disorder from the viewpoints of the best minds in the various disciplines involved.
Purpose: The purpose is to provide a comprehensive resource for those who work with children who have growth failure. The hope is to help them do their work better and move the field forward.
Audience: It is written for physicians, nutritionists, nurse practitioners, early interventionists, public health personnel, home visitors, community health nurses, social workers, speech-language pathologists, occupational specialists, and policy makers.
Features: The introductory chapter discusses the confusion regarding the term "failure to thrive." Unfortunately, after making a compelling argument for abandoning the term, it is used in the title of this book and in each chapter. The book makes great progress towards recognizing the differences and similarities between malnutrition in children worldwide and understanding growth failure in industrialized countries; however, the gap is not completely bridged. This book remains a step in a process of reconciliation. Sorting the various factors that potentially contribute to growth failure in a child is intellectually challenging for seasoned pediatricians. This book represents the state-of-the-art understanding of these various factors and it covers the gamut from the parent-child relationship to medical, family, and societal disorders. One can not help but feel somewhat overwhelmed by the complexity of this condition, but each chapter is short enough to break it into digestible portions. The medical evaluation is nicely outlined, with due restraint urged to avoid overtesting and unnecessary hospitalization. There is good attention paid to all aspects of this complex condition including cross-cultural issues, psychological and medical factors, and issues related to advocacy, managed care, and classification. The complexity of this condition supports the evaluation by specialists in different fields. Outcome of treatment for this condition is better when a transdisciplinary approach is used. A short, poignant, chapter defines the difficulties in running one of these teams. It also highlights the value of home-based intervention in treatment. The book has the general appearance of a grade school textbook. It is a good size to hold and read. The color of the pages and print font are pleasing. There is no use of color photos or text to allure the reader. The photos appear to be grayscale copies of color photos, so clarity and impact is lost. Some of the pages were not cut so they did not separate. The main problem with the book is its organization. Each chapter seems isolated and sometimes duplicates the content in other chapters. The wonderful chapters on "The Feeding Relationship" and "Behavior Problems in Feeding, Individual, Family, and Cultural Influences," are separated from the section on families, including chapters on "Cultural Issues in Provider-Parent Relationships," "Family Routines and the Feeding Process," "Psychological Issues and Infant-Parent Psychotherapy," and "Toward Understanding the Role of Attachment in Malnutrition." There is admixture of prevention, assessment, and treatment in the each chapter. The complexity of this field is highlighted, and a transdisciplinary approach is supported, but the reader must digest the entire book to gain the wisdom needed to approach this condition. It would have helped to have the sections on prevention, assessment, and management with more interactions among the participating contributors (similar to the functional transdisciplinary team endorsed). About 20 percent of the book is devoted to useful and under-recognized resources which are contained in the appendixes. These provide a great reference resource for the generalist.
Assessment: The work builds on, adds to, and possibly supplants the prior works, like Accardo's Failure to Thrive in Infancy and Early Childhood (1982), and Drotar's New Directions in Failure to Thrive: Implications for Research and Practice (1986). Many of the authors in the second book present updated information in this current work. I recommend this book as an essential component of the core library for all general pediatricians. I encourage them to read it completely. It should be available, as a reference, for all other professionals who deal with infants and young children.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Jeffery A. Wright, MD (University of Washington School of Medicine)
Description: An outstanding group of experts in the field of pediatric under nutrition has been assembled. This comprehensive review looks at the complex disorder from the viewpoints of the best minds in the various disciplines involved.
Purpose: The purpose is to provide a comprehensive resource for those who work with children who have growth failure. The hope is to help them do their work better and move the field forward.
Audience: It is written for physicians, nutritionists, nurse practitioners, early interventionists, public health personnel, home visitors, community health nurses, social workers, speech-language pathologists, occupational specialists, and policy makers.
Features: The introductory chapter discusses the confusion regarding the term "failure to thrive." Unfortunately, after making a compelling argument for abandoning the term, it is used in the title of this book and in each chapter. The book makes great progress towards recognizing the differences and similarities between malnutrition in children worldwide and understanding growth failure in industrialized countries; however, the gap is not completely bridged. This book remains a step in a process of reconciliation. Sorting the various factors that potentially contribute to growth failure in a child is intellectually challenging for seasoned pediatricians. This book represents the state-of-the-art understanding of these various factors and it covers the gamut from the parent-child relationship to medical, family, and societal disorders. One can not help but feel somewhat overwhelmed by the complexity of this condition, but each chapter is short enough to break it into digestible portions. The medical evaluation is nicely outlined, with due restraint urged to avoid overtesting and unnecessary hospitalization. There is good attention paid to all aspects of this complex condition including cross-cultural issues, psychological and medical factors, and issues related to advocacy, managed care, and classification. The complexity of this condition supports the evaluation by specialists in different fields. Outcome of treatment for this condition is better when a transdisciplinary approach is used. A short, poignant, chapter defines the difficulties in running one of these teams. It also highlights the value of home-based intervention in treatment. The book has the general appearance of a grade school textbook. It is a good size to hold and read. The color of the pages and print font are pleasing. There is no use of color photos or text to allure the reader. The photos appear to be grayscale copies of color photos, so clarity and impact is lost. Some of the pages were not cut so they did not separate. The main problem with the book is its organization. Each chapter seems isolated and sometimes duplicates the content in other chapters. The wonderful chapters on "The Feeding Relationship" and "Behavior Problems in Feeding, Individual, Family, and Cultural Influences," are separated from the section on families, including chapters on "Cultural Issues in Provider-Parent Relationships," "Family Routines and the Feeding Process," "Psychological Issues and Infant-Parent Psychotherapy," and "Toward Understanding the Role of Attachment in Malnutrition." There is admixture of prevention, assessment, and treatment in the each chapter. The complexity of this field is highlighted, and a transdisciplinary approach is supported, but the reader must digest the entire book to gain the wisdom needed to approach this condition. It would have helped to have the sections on prevention, assessment, and management with more interactions among the participating contributors (similar to the functional transdisciplinary team endorsed). About 20 percent of the book is devoted to useful and under-recognized resources which are contained in the appendixes. These provide a great reference resource for the generalist.
Assessment: The work builds on, adds to, and possibly supplants the prior works, like Accardo's Failure to Thrive in Infancy and Early Childhood (1982), and Drotar's New Directions in Failure to Thrive: Implications for Research and Practice (1986). Many of the authors in the second book present updated information in this current work. I recommend this book as an essential component of the core library for all general pediatricians. I encourage them to read it completely. It should be available, as a reference, for all other professionals who deal with infants and young children.
Booknews
Thirty-seven contributions from a variety of disciplines discuss the condition of infants and young children, generally three years and younger, who fail to grow as expected based on established growth standards for age and gender. The sections detail underlying causes such as nutrition and feeding, the traditional medical aspects of undernutrition, child development issues, clinician issues, community services, and social policies. The appendices include growth charts, questionnaires, methods of assessing feeding, and family interactions. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781557663481
  • Publisher: Brookes, Paul H. Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 1/28/1999
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 13
  • Pages: 620
  • Product dimensions: 7.10 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Table of Contents

About the Editors
Contributors
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
Ch. 1 Failure to Thrive and Pediatric Undernutrition: Historical and Theoretical Context 3
Ch. 2 Epidemiology of Inadequate Growth 19
Ch. 3 Effects of Undernutrition on Growth and Development 37
Ch. 4 Working with Families: An Overview for Providers 65
Ch. 5 Researching Failure to Thrive: Progress, Problems, and Recommendations 77
Ch. 6 Nutrition 99
Ch. 7 The Feeding Relationship 121
Ch. 8 Behavior Problems in Feeding: Individual, Family, and Cultural Influences 151
Ch. 9 Medical Assessment and Management and the Organization of Medical Services 173
Ch. 10 Clinical Assessment of Growth 195
Ch. 11 Gastrointestinal Problems and Disorders 215
Ch. 12 Cardiopulmonary Problems and Disorders of the Head and Neck 227
Ch. 13 Infectious Disease and Nutrition 239
Ch. 14 Neurological and Genetic Disorders 245
Ch. 15 Endocrine Disorders 255
Ch. 16 Adverse Reactions to Foods 261
Ch. 17 Anemia, Lead Exposure, Renal Disease, and Dental Caries 269
Ch. 18 Effects of Prenatal Exposures to Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs 275
Ch. 19 Diagnostic Coding of Children with Failure to Thrive 281
Ch. 20 Managed Care as Part of Family-Centered Service Systems 287
Ch. 21 Pediatric Undernutrition and Managed Health Care 295
Ch. 22 Interdisciplinary Teamwork 303
Ch. 23 Oral-Motor Skills and Swallowing 309
Ch. 24 Detecting Communication Difficulties in Infants and Toddlers Who Have Feeding Difficulties 319
Ch. 25 Nutrition Services in Early Intervention Programs 335
Ch. 26 Cultural Issues in Provider-Parent Relationships 351
Ch. 27 Family Routines and the Feeding Process 375
Ch. 28 Home-Visiting Intervention for Families of Children Who Experience Growth Delay 385
Ch. 29 Psychological Issues and Infant-Parent Psychotherapy 395
Ch. 30 Toward Understanding the Role of Attachment in Malnutrition 411
Ch. 31 Child Protective Services 425
Ch. 32 Nutrition in Child Care 437
Ch. 33 Community Food and Nutrition Programs 451
Ch. 34 Program Evaluation 469
Ch. 35 Coordination of Services 477
Ch. 36 Advocacy for Children and Families 489
Ch. 37 Pediatric Undernutrition and Public Policy 503
App. A Glossary 515
App. B PROCESS: Pediatric Review and Observation of Children's Environmental Support and Stimulation 525
App. C The NCAST Feeding Scale 533
App. D The Feeding Scale 539
App. E AIMS: Developmental Indicators of Emotional Health 545
App. F Food Diary, Questionnaire About Growth and Nutrition, Growth Plotting Aid, Reference Data on Weight Gain During the First 2 Years of Life, Conversion of Pounds and Ounces to Grams and of Inches to Centimeters, Growth Charts for Low Birth Weight Infants, Parent-Specific Adjustments for Evaluation of Length 555
Index 593
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