Fairy Haven and the Quest for the Wand
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Fairy Haven and the Quest for the Wand

4.4 16
by Gail Carson Levine, David Christiana
     
 

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In this best-selling sequel to Fairy Dust and the Quest for the Egg, Newbery Honor winning author Gail Carson Levine and illustrator David Christiana spin a riveting fairy tale about the dangers of dreams come true. The mermaid Soop has sent a flood to Fairy Haven! Water-talent fairy Rani must bring Soop a wand, or the Home Tree and all the Never fairies will

Overview

In this best-selling sequel to Fairy Dust and the Quest for the Egg, Newbery Honor winning author Gail Carson Levine and illustrator David Christiana spin a riveting fairy tale about the dangers of dreams come true. The mermaid Soop has sent a flood to Fairy Haven! Water-talent fairy Rani must bring Soop a wand, or the Home Tree and all the Never fairies will be swept away.

But wise Mother Dove isn't sure which is worse, a wand or a flood. Wand wishes, tantalizing wand wishes, are risky. The most innocent wish can cause untold trouble. And not even Mother Dove knows that wands have hearts and minds-kind hearts or cruel hearts, sympathetic minds or minds filled with spite and mischief.

Rani, Tinker Bell, and Ree, queen of the Never fairies, set out on a perilous quest for a wand, a journey that takes them across an ocean to the palace of the terrifying Great Wanded fairies. Many obstacles stand between the questers and success: Tink's disappearance, a mermaid's magical song, wand madness, and even Never Land itself.

Meanwhile, the floodwaters are rising. . .

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Peg Glisson
In this sequel to Fairy Dust and the Quest for the Egg, Soop the mermaid is tired of waiting for the wand Rani has promised her. She threatens to send a flood to drown the fairies of Never Land. Rani convinces Mother Dove to let her, Tink, and Fairy Queen Ree embark on a quest to the Land of the Wanding Fairies to secure a wand and stop the flooding. Wand madness takes them over, as it does Soop, once the wand is given to her. Their selfish and/or greedy wishes cause Mother Dove's egg (the source of magical fairy dust) to begin to hatch and Rani to become Rani-Bat; now the fairies of Never Land must try to redeem her, save the egg, and tame the wand, which has a mind of its own. Sound convoluted? It is! Readers unfamiliar with the first book will initially find this sophisticated magical world and its characters difficult to understand. The slight story does have worthwhile themes—greed, power, jealousy, and finding inner strengths and talents. Christiana's detailed drawings were not yet in full color and were difficult to evaluate. Some appeared beautifully detailed while others were in sketch form. Youngsters who are into the Disney Princess/Fairies lines will definitely flock to this book and accompanying merchandise.
School Library Journal

Gr 2-4 In this sequel to Fairy Dust and the Quest for the Egg (Disney, 2005), Rani has promised a magic wand to a mermaid, Soop. When she can't provide it, Soop sets in motion a flood that may destroy the fairies' world. Wise Mother Dove then allows Rani and two others to go on a quest to the Great Wanded fairies. Even when the item is secured and the flood averted, adventures continue. Rani takes on the form of a bat, and her friends must rescue her. Soop and her friend exploit the wand in anger but cannot reverse their regrettable spells. Tinker Bell may not be able to shape the wand into an instrument of good. Nearly every creature wants at least one try at having a wish granted. They come to realize how easily their best wishes could turn ugly, and how much responsibility the wand demands. Although this fantasy fairy world is intriguing, the writing sometimes seems less than magical. Too often Levine tells thoughts and emotions instead of allowing the action to convey them. That's a shame, because the book itself is lovely. Christiana's watercolors convey a nostalgic tone; their soft colors reflect the feel of fantasy. Quality paper and colorful full-page illustrations, along with spot art and illuminated chapter beginnings, result in a beautiful book. With the current popularity of fairies and fantasy, chapter-book readers will be pleased to welcome these further adventures in Fairy Haven.-Pat Leach, Lincoln City Libraries, NE

Kirkus Reviews
This sequel to Fairy Dust and the Quest for the Egg (2005) returns readers to the magical world of Fairy Haven in Never Land where wise Mother Dove stills sits on her egg to ensure the production of fairy dust and endless youth. But all is not well. The fairy Rani has failed to deliver a magic wand she promised the mermaid Soop, who threatens to flood Fairy Haven until Rani produces the wand. As flood waters rise, Mother Dove reluctantly dispatches Rani, Ree and Tink to Queen Tutupia of the Great Wanded fairies for a wand and worries "a wand could bring out the worst in anyone, even a Never fairy." Tutupia warns the questing fairies that the wand will obey commands, but not reverse them. As Rani, Ree and Tink transport the wand to Soop, they are consumed with wand madness. Motivated by greed, jealousy and selfishness, their irreversible commands create chaos that could be disastrous unless they learn how to tame the troublesome wand. Faerie-filled illustrations highlight the diminutive drama and prove the perfect foil for the further adventures of these fantastical Never Land characters. (Fantasy. 6-10)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781423101000
Publisher:
Disney Press
Publication date:
07/31/2007
Pages:
208
Product dimensions:
1.00(w) x 1.00(h) x 1.00(d)
Lexile:
630L (what's this?)
Age Range:
6 - 10 Years

Meet the Author

When Gail Carson Levine (http://gailcarsonlevine.blogspot.com/) was little, she loved to act out fairy tales, and she often made pretend magic wands out of sticks. Back then, she never thought about the intricacies of a wand, and she had no idea she'd ever write a book about one! Gail is also the author of many acclaimed children's books, including the New York Times best seller Fairy Dust and the Quest for the Egg; Newbery Honor Book Ella Enchanted; and Writing Magic, a how-to guide for young writers. Gail lives with her husband, David, and their Airedale, Baxter, in a 220-year-old farmhouse in New York's Hudson Valley.

David Christiana has illustrated over twenty books for children, including four that he wrote. He lives in Tucson, Arizona, with his wife, Kristie Atwood, and teaches illustration at the University of Arizona and at the Orvieto Institute in Italy.

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Fairy Haven and the Quest for the Wand 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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heather27410 More than 1 year ago
she hasn't read it yet...I'll keep ya posted.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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LifeLongLoverofLiterature More than 1 year ago
This is in response to the person who believes that very young children cannot enjoy these books. I read from this series aloud to my daughter. We began them when she was 5 and often re-read them. Now that she is 6 and beginning to read well on her own, she takes a turn reading as well. She loves them! Besides enjoying the adventure aspects, she asks questions which bring up great conversations. Additionally she comments on the moral themes in the stories. We all learn by stretching beyond what is precisely comfortable. What better time for fairies and make-believe than this time when they are developmentally excited by magic and imagination?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Gail Carson Levine is an amazingly talented fantasy writer and this series is adorable! I am really into fairies and fantasy lit so even though I'm 17 I'm a huge fan. Illustrations are by David Christiana and are breathtaking. I read the prequel, 'Fairy Dust and the Quest for the Egg,' which I absolutely adore, about one year ago.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I like this book because it is full of adventure,its also a very fun book to read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I love the book, but I think the age range is wrong. Like a 4 or 6 year old is going o read this book or understand what it means. It's like a newborn undestanding the meaning of life.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Like Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter, but for very young children. Tells of how a spell is cast, even for good reasons, that it can become bad, as most books of magic teach.