Faith and the Rocket Cat

Faith and the Rocket Cat

3.0 2
by Patrick Jennings
     
 

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This is the story of a girl named Faith and her dog, Edison, and her cat, Veevy. Faith and Edison and Veevy are electric. They are also rocketeers. If you would like to know more, open this book and Edison will tell you the whole story...See more details below

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Overview

This is the story of a girl named Faith and her dog, Edison, and her cat, Veevy. Faith and Edison and Veevy are electric. They are also rocketeers. If you would like to know more, open this book and Edison will tell you the whole story...

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 3-5-Edison the "electric" dog (a play on the Spanish term for mixed breed) narrates this story about his owner Faith's family's move from Mexico to San Francisco. In an attempt to impress others, both the girl and her pet lure unsuspecting and unbelieving passengers into their rocket, the Peahen, which runs on pig fat and jalapenos. Unbeknownst to the flight crew, Edison's guest, a snooty whippet he met on the plane from Mexico, eats most of the fuel pre-takeoff, causing the craft to crash land in Death Valley. Luckily, it does so near the Lulu, an older vehicle that mysteriously disappeared, apparently commandeered by Faith's deceased father's cat after the man passed away. In the old rocket, there is enough fuel (olives and garlic) to get everyone back to San Francisco, but only after fighting off a pack of coyotes. The abrupt ending gives the impression that the author himself is anxious to get the meagerly plotted story over with. Too many things in the story rely on or refer to Faith and the Electric Dogs (Scholastic, 1996) for this one to stand alone, and the magical elements are not convincing here. Edison's narrative tone tends to be just a little too knowing to appeal to the intended audience. Also, he constantly uses terms in Spanish, Bowwow, and a few other languages that are annoyingly defined in the margins. This offering will only be worthwhile for serious fans of the first book.-Carrie Schadle, New York Public Library
Kirkus Reviews
This follow-up to Faith and the Electric Dogs (1996), with its authentically doggy narrator, is as refreshingly unconventional as the original. Edison, the "electric dog" (a pun on el perro corriente, which can also be translated as "mutt"), again takes pen in mouth to relate an aerial adventure with his young human companion, Faith. For Edison, the move from his small Mexican town to San Francisco means both the ecstasy of pork dumplings and the pleasure of pursuing Daphne, a ravishing whippet who shares what he calls his porklust; for Faith, however, the move to her hometown brings back memories of her dead father, plus all-too-present classroom nemesis Alex Wao. Strewing his memoir with phrases in Spanish, Chinese, Bowwow, Mew, Turkish, and other languagesþall translated in the margins and in a glossary at the backþEdison places himself, Daphne, Faith, and her irritable but loving mother, Alex, aboard a homemade rocket, which, as it is fueled by pig fat, comes down in the middle of Death Valley. All is not lost, though, as another rocket (powered by olive oil and garlic) has crashed nearby. In a plot as full of twists and surprises as its two unusually talented main characters, Faith is able to get everyone back home, rescue her beloved lost cat, Veevy, and ease her own grief in the bargain. A blissful multilingual escapade. (Fiction. 10-12)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780590110044
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
08/01/1998
Pages:
232
Product dimensions:
6.35(w) x 7.34(h) x 0.87(d)
Lexile:
610L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 11 Years

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