Faith Bass Darling's Last Garage Sale

Faith Bass Darling's Last Garage Sale

3.9 29
by Lynda Rutledge
     
 

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On the last day of the millennium, sassy Faith Bass Darling, the richest old lady in Bass, Texas, decides to have a garage sale. With help from a couple of neighborhood boys, Faith lugs her priceless Louis XV elephant clock, countless Tiffany lamps, and everything else in her nineteenth-century mansion out onto her long, sloping lawn.

Why is a recluse of twenty

Overview

On the last day of the millennium, sassy Faith Bass Darling, the richest old lady in Bass, Texas, decides to have a garage sale. With help from a couple of neighborhood boys, Faith lugs her priceless Louis XV elephant clock, countless Tiffany lamps, and everything else in her nineteenth-century mansion out onto her long, sloping lawn.

Why is a recluse of twenty years suddenly selling off her dearest posessions? Because God told her to.

As the townspeople grab up five generations of heirlooms, everyone drawn to the sale--including Faith's long-lost daughter--finds that the antiques not only hold family secrets but also inspire some of life's most important questions: Do our possessions possess us? What are we without our memories? Is there life after death or second chances here on earth? And is Faith really selling that Tiffany lamp for $1?

READERS GUIDE INCLUDED

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
When Faith Bass Darling hears the voice of God telling her to sell all her possessions because she will die that night, the reclusive heiress drags everything onto the lawn for a garage sale. Her sanity is questionable, but her neighbors’ opportunism is not. Local antiques dealer Bobbie Blankenship hears about the goings on and calls Faith’s estranged daughter, Claudia Jean, to alert her to her mother’s strange behavior. Claudia reluctantly returns home and reconnects with deputy sheriff John Jasper Johnson, who tries to help her end the sale and deal with the mother she hasn’t seen in 20 years. Faith reflects on her life and her values, from her troubling marriage to Claude, a violent man who married her for her money, to her falling out with Claudia Jean, and the death of her son, Mike, in an accident that changed John Jasper’s life. Rutledge, a fifth-generation Texan, paints a colorful portrait of a larger than life Texas matron, but her debut offers nothing new on the story’s well-trod themes of Southern racism, old money, and materialism. (May)
From the Publisher
"With a big Texas heart, Lynda Rutledge writes of second chances, redemption, what we truly own, and what we must release in this spectacular novel...Put a sticker on this one, it's a keeper."—New York Times bestselling author Adriana Trigiani

"I loved every page...Treat yourself to this luminous, enchanting story."—New York Times bestselling author Haywood Smith

"A small-town novel that asks big questions about life...A most thought-provoking read."—New York Times bestselling author Tiffany Baker

"Eerie, charming, heartrending, and heartbreaking at the same time, Rutledge's novel is a triumph."—W. P. (Bill) Kinsella, author of Shoeless Joe, the basis for the blockbuster movie Field of Dreams

"Oh, my God, this novel is GOOD!! I knew the idea was INSPIRED but I didn't dream what Rutledge could do with words. It knocked my socks off, and that doesn't happen often."—Jenny Winfield, author of The Homecoming of Samuel Lake

"Reminiscent of early works of Larry McMurtry and Edward Swift...in her wry and witty voice, Rutledge has given the tale, if not greater power, at least a contemporary twist...Adept at gently mocking the small-mindedness of small towns and celebrating the expansiveness of small-town souls, the author crafts a tale of love, identity, and redemption—not to mention some killer discount shopping."—The Texas Observer

Library Journal
It's a shock to everyone in Bass, TX, when wealthy Faith Bass Darling, a recluse for 20 years, throws open her doors and moves her antique furniture to the lawn. She tells Deputy John Jasper Johnson, a friend of her deceased son, that God had revealed to her that she would die on December 31, 1999, and that she should have a garage sale. As she divests herself of family heirlooms, a friend calls Faith's estranged daughter, Claudia. Now, a mother and daughter face the same questions. What is the value of possessions when they alienate family and loved ones? What if our memories and our lives are based on misconceptions? Rutledge's novel asks her characters to rethink everything they believed was true in their lives. VERDICT This solid debut is a fascinating character-driven story of misconceptions, family, and tragedy. Fortunately, Rutledge also alleviates the somber tone with moments of humor. Recommended for those who enjoy Southern fiction as well as book clubs and others who appreciate a story with multiple layers for discussion.—Lesa Holstine, Glendale P.L., AZ
Kirkus Reviews
Under the looming shadow of Y2K, the very proper Faith Bass Darling hauls all of her priceless family possessions onto her front lawn for a very improper yard sale in Rutledge's debut novel. Surprised and delighted to catch sight of the reclusive Faith, neighbors and strangers descend upon the Darlings' lawn to snap up Tiffany lamps and Spode china for quarters. Alarmed less by Faith's evident Alzheimer's than by the shocking loss of capital, Bobbie Ann Blankenship rushes over to save what she can. Now sole proprietor of the Yesteryear Antique Shop, Bobbie plans to keep Faith's possessions safe from unscrupulous buyers until Faith consents to a dignified estate sale, or until Faith's daughter, Claudia, comes home. But first, Bobbie might just take that mysterious elephant clock--the one item Faith does not want to sell. Claudia hasn't been home in 20 years, not since she hid a certain family ring, a ring passed down from her great-great-grandmother Belle, a ring replete with a three-carat diamond surrounded by seed pearls, a ring inscribed Love Eternal, a ring hidden in a desk on the Darlings' lawn. A failed Buddhist, Claudia doesn't want the ring for itself but for the chance it offers to invest in her dream of becoming part-owner of an upscale fitness club. Once home, Claudia must confront her mother's illness, as well as the return of her first love, Deputy John Jasper Johnson. With the help of John Jasper, Bobbie, Father George and Dr. Peabody, Claudia begins to understand her mother, her mother's illness and their relationship. Faith herself confronts the memories of her past as she moves from room to room, object to object. Those memories contain some dark family secrets having to do with the deaths of her husband, Claude Angus Darling, and her son, Mike. This potentially poignant story of misplaced emotional attachments and misremembered pasts falters under its wispy tone.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101580608
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
04/26/2012
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
336
Sales rank:
141,051
File size:
562 KB
Age Range:
18 Years

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From the Publisher
“I can’t remember when I’ve enjoyed a first novel so much. Eerie, charming, heartrending, and heartbreaking at the same time, Rutledge’s novel is a triumph.” —W. P. (Bill) Kinsella, author of Shoeless Joe, the basis for the blockbuster movie Field of Dreams

Meet the Author

Lynda Rutledge, a fifth-generation Texan, has petted baby rhinos, snorkled with endangered turtles, and dodged hurricanes as a freelance journalist, while winning awards for her fiction.

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Faith Bass Darling's Last Garage Sale 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was fantastic, one of the best I've read in many years. Each and every character resonated and of course Faith Bass Darling will be permanently fixed in my mind as one of the best characters ever. Absorbing and brilliantly written, I predict this book will be a classic. I loved it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Faith Bass Darling's Last Garage Sale is a charming novel that you will want to read again and again. It is beautifully written, with wonderful characters. I would highly recommend it!
dhaupt More than 1 year ago
There’s an old saying money can’t buy happiness and that’s very true for Faith Bass Darling, she lost her son in a terrible accident, her husband’s death followed soon after and her daughter ran away in her teens, yes this was years ago but Faith seems to be reliving it like an old movie loop. Now lately her days aren’t as clear as they once were but when she’s woken up not once but three times by a God she hasn’t spoken to in years, she takes notice. Does he give her an epiphany, or give her prophecies, oh no he tells her to clear out her stately mansion in Bass Texas and have a garage sale to end all garage sales and on this the most momentous of days, December 31, 1999. So on the dawn of a new century lives will change in the small once prosperous now mostly forgotten town of Bass Texas and the ripple effect will spread until no one is spared the backlash, especially Faith, Bobbie Ann Blankenship, Claudia Darling, Father George Fallow and John Jasper Johnson. These lives will be changed forever, but will the sale change them for the good or for the worse. I love reading debut novels, it always feels like birth when a new voice in the writing community comes on the scene and it was no different with this unexpected gem of a novel. Now by the title you might think that Ms. Rutledge has a comedy, well you’d be wrong just like I was. Instead inside this book I found the epic struggles of her characters and finally absolution and resolution, there were haunted and troubled people who could be anyone I know and I loved how the author came to her conclusions and found solace for her troubled crew. She used dialogue that I could easily read and understand and her narrative was animated enough that I could easily put myself in the scenes she created. This is a read that would appeal to a wide audience by both sexes and many ages. Now if you’re looking for a novel that gives you a concrete conclusion this isn’t for you, but if like me you like to have that almost absolute ending yet with degrees of variations left to your own imagination, then this is definitely your next must read. Ms. Rutledge this was exactly the kind of novel that goes on my keeper shelf to be brought out to read again and again and to share with only those who can be trusted with a treasured keepsake. Thank you and I look forward to what you come up with next.
jpcoggins More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book!  The story is as intriguing as its cover!  I was first attracted to it by the cover and the fact that Adriana Trigiani endorses it on the front  too.  And yes, parts of it are laugh out loud funny.  You will fall in love with all of the main characters:  Faith Bass Darling as she relives her life while casually selling off a lifetime of treasured antiques, the house itself and what it stands for to the residents of this town in the middle of nowhere Texas, Faith's estranged daughter as she returns home, and the town sheriff who has a long relationship and tie to the family.  Personally I despise garage sales, but this is one NOT TO BE MISSED!   I hope you love it as much as I did.  And I can't wait to see what Ms. Rutledge will write next!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved the down home story and the dysfunctional family in this story. Funny, sad, and sometime painfully true.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was completely unprepared for this book to be so GOOD! It's rare to find a debut novel that can make you laugh and cry AND think. Especially one with a setting at a garage sale, for crying out loud! Even the antiques are like characters that help slowly unfold the plot. I just loved it. So original. So much fun. And yet so smart with so much good stuff to takeaway. If you think it's fluff, or the stereotypical quirky Southern novel, you're in for a surprise. For me, it was a great one!
Cyndy3 More than 1 year ago
I thought this book was excellent. Filled with love and hate and hope and despair. The characters were well drawn. I didn't necessarily like the all but they were real. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
just so-so
RtBBlog More than 1 year ago
Reviewed by Angie Book provided by the publisher for review Review originally posted at Romancing the Book This review is so hard to write as I want to be fair in my review, yet not take away from the book at all. First, though I wanted to love this book, instead all I can say is that I like it. Ever the fan of HEAs {Happily Ever After} or even something remotely close to that, there was closure, but no real semblance of happiness. Don’t get me wrong; the writing is impeccable, the characters are well thought out and the plot is complicated, but keeps you interested. Though, to be honest, I found the plot to be tedious at times because I couldn’t quite figure out what was going on; it took until almost the end of the book before I realized what everything was all about and why these people acted the way I did. Faith is a lovely woman who is losing her mind. At first I wondered if her dead husband was taking her over, but that wasn’t the case at all…she just couldn’t remember things. John Jasper and Bobbie were my favorite characters. Bobbie isn’t afraid to go after what she wants and John Jasper, though haunted by a past he can not let go off nor change, is sweet and caring under his gruff exterior. The only character I really disliked was Faith’s daughter Claudia Jean. That woman runs away from EVERYTHING and seems to be scared of her own shadow. She does redeem herself towards the end and wasn’t quite as annoying, but I still didn’t really care for her. I would actually love for their to be a sequel. There are snippets of information and provenances that I savored and wanted to know more about. Faith’s family sounds interesting and the love that her grandfather had for his wife and her own father’s love for her mother was just beautiful. Overall, I give this book a 3.5 as I did like it…I just didn’t love it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
literarymuseVC More than 1 year ago
“Doesn't the soul have a memory?...If not, what’s all this living for?” This is the key question Faith Bass Darling asks Father George Fallow, the local Episcopalian priest. For Faith has late stage Alzheimer’s disease and knows her mind is shutting on and off so regularly that she can’t discriminate between real conversations with old friends and neighbors and the “ghosts” she keeps seeing and conversing with. Faith was once a woman truly blessed or at least so she thought when she was younger. But now one terrible tragedy, a marriage of convenience for her late husband, and a daughter who ran away has taught her differently. She’s dropped her Baptist church-going; indeed in the recent past years she has lived the life of a recluse. That’s all changed now because God has spoken to her. She’s got the rest of one day to get it all right. Everyone has tortured memories which are painful in this novel and yet Lynda Rutledge mixes humor, puzzles and a type of mystery plot in which we learn the separate but oh so connected story of each character. These include Father Fallow who has been a priest so long that he presides over services in a rote fashion that has absolutely no meaning for him; yet Faith is the one person whose honesty and pain have touched him deeply to search more for the next step in his journey. Then there’s Sheriff John Jaspar who used to be best friends with Faith’s son Michael; he’s an African-American whose rage at racism once, he believes, caused the terrible tragedy in Faith’s life. Yet she continues to be kind to him. Faith’s daughter, Claudia, has been running for years but now she’s returned to find her mother selling “everything” in the house on the front lawn, specifically charging from a quarter to a dollar for antique furniture, Tiffany lamps, etc. Claudia wants one thing which she believes will solve her problems but she’s going to get more than she bargained for and learn a great deal about her “real” problems in the process. On and on it goes. A final group of scenes are so unexpected one doesn’t know whether to laugh or cry. Faith Bass Darling’s Last Garage Sale is a wonderful, engaging novel about what really matters with memories and relationships, about moving past ideals and dealing with reality, about forgiveness, expectations, disappointments, and so, so much more! Superb fiction which should be a bestseller and would make a grand movie!!!!
MyBookAddictionandMore More than 1 year ago
FAITH BASS DARLING'S LAST GARAGE SALE by Lynda Rutledge is an interesting inspirational Women's fiction set in Bass,Texas. Follow Faith Bass Darling on an adventure of second chances,redemption,family secrets,faith,a lifetime of memories. Possessions does not make the person or their life as Faith learns. A charming,enduring story of triumph and heartbreak. What a charming debut for this author. If you enjoy small town life,a bit of laughter,heartbreak,and a lot of love this is the story for you. With engaging,charming,and eccentric characters you will adore and love "Faith Bass Darling's Last Garage Sale" long after the last page. Received for an honest review from the publisher. RATING: 4 HEAT RATING: SWEET REVIEWED BY: AprilR, My Book Addiction and More/My Book Addiction Reviews
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
would not recommend, the book started out really well but then it became boring, I started to skip and finally just gave up. I love southern fiction but not this one.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
owlsfeathers More than 1 year ago
December 31, 1999. Y2K madness. Tiffany lamps. Elephant clocks. Rolltop desks. A ring. Faith and faith. Family secrets. Forgotten friends. Memories. Possessions. Welcome to the eponymous Bass, TX, and the spontaneous yard sale rolling out on the lawn of the stately Queen Anne mansion owned by Faith Bass Darling who, in her 69th year, decides that she does not want to go before she's gone or die before she's dead. This book reminded me why I love to read.
BBR47 More than 1 year ago
Lynda Rutledge’s book is a pure joy to read. Well written, with a unique approach to unlocking the historical secrets of a family, it kept me reading despite my intentions to only read fifty pages a day. There was enough intrigue to keep me going, but not so much that I was overwhelmed by doom and gloom. At the same time, as the mysteries unfolded, there were charming tales of antiques that were being sold off in a yard sale to dozens of families who had no idea of their true value. The ending is clever and unexpected. It leaves you with a nice warm feeling for both Lynda and the characters she created.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Yu ck
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Yall stupid get guts and go with real pepole dummys
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A Girl with red wavy hair just below her shoulder blades walks in. Her eyes are purple. "Can i join you?"
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The title was enticing but the story was long and fairly boring.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
She whimpers and pads away. Sh just wanted a home.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
shrugs i dt know...i may have to go soon but ill be back in like an hour
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Kk thanks
Valca85 More than 1 year ago
There are many things going for this book. One, the plot sounds really interesting and wholly unique. Two, the cover is fantastic. Three, it’s a debut and that’s always exciting. For me, though, it held a lot of unfulfilled promise. The main issue that I found with it is that it is rather dull. Slow-paced and convoluted, the narrative is not nearly interesting enough to keep the reader fully focused on the page. Many times I found myself skimming, which is horrible both for the reader and for the writer. No one wants her words ignored. None of the characters are likeable in a manner that will keep you looking to see what happens next, and there seemed to be a lot of “filler” scenes that didn’t do much for the story or for character advancement. There were a few moments which were well written, with wit and managing to avoid the pathos that permeate the rest of the book. I’m not saying it’s an easy topic to write about. It’s very tough to avoid melodrama when dealing with Alzheimer’s as a plot point, but it can be done. Just, for me, not like this. I can’t really recommend this, although I’m sure there are many people out there who’ll say the complete opposite. It’s just wasn’t as deep and lovely as I thought it’d be.