The Fall

The Fall

4.6 28
by Albert Camus
     
 

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Elegantly styled, Camus' profoundly disturbing novel of a Parisian lawyer's confessions is a searing study of modern amorality.

Overview

Elegantly styled, Camus' profoundly disturbing novel of a Parisian lawyer's confessions is a searing study of modern amorality.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780394424248
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
06/15/1957

Meet the Author

Albert Camus (1913-1960) was an Algerian-born French author, philosopher, and journalist. He is generally considered one of the fathers of Existentialism along with Jean-Paul Sartre (though Camus is famously quoted as saying "I am not an Existentialist"). Camus is most well known for his books The Stranger and The Plague, which have become classic examples of Absurdist and Existential Literature. In 1957, he won the Nobel Prize in Literature.

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The Fall 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 28 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This novel, The Fall, has really caused me to think of the person I am, and the person I want to be. It has changed my outlook on people in general.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Since it was the first i have read of Camus's work i was completely take back by his writing. At fist i had thought it would be just another existentialist novel, but once i had read it the depth and reality that was brought to the character i was taken back. Not to mention the way that Camus describes Clamences feelings and visions especially when he keeps refering the the woman on the bridge. i would recomend this novel to anyone willing to take another look on life and ready to read one of the best existentialist books of all time.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Albert Camus' The Fall is simply amazing! I was, by default, hesitant to pick it up having just read Hunger by Knut Hamsun (also a disturbing, yet profound stream-of-consciousness novel), but I couldn't put it down!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
An outstanding work: reads more like an extended commentary, rather than a novel. Camus forces the reader to check his/her own conscience through the actions of the narrator. Existential, but very understandable: it's difficult not to empathize with the narrator, despite his failings.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Having just read this book for the second time I am even more staggered as to how impressive it is. Camus is uncannily insightful, and even though the subject matter leads the reader to question his own motives and ethics on an elemental level, it is an exhilarating experience to be sure. Whether you want to or not, you will relate to the protagonist...
Guest More than 1 year ago
These are the confessions of a modern man, an everyman starting out as a 'nice person,' productive, well liked. Then he slowly, agonized, finds out, or reasons, or surmises somehow, how loathsome he and everyone else really is. Camus writes like Hemingway and the book is hard to stop reading. I read it in one sitting. His fall into depression is so logical, so left brained: the hero takes you to a mind hell with him. Unforgetable. It is easy to see why Albert Camus, although famous during his lifetime more as an existentialist philosopher, will no doubt be thought formost as novelist and short story writer.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Changes how you view people
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Good book
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