Fall and Winter

( 3 )

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Jared Johnson
Anyone who wondered what Switchfoot's frontman would sound like sans the band's wall of distortion finally got their answer -- a stripped down set of rewarding indie rock that showed more facets of the songwriter than most knew could be possible. After a decade pioneering Switchfoot's multi-platinum crossover success from Christian novelty act to arena headliners, Jon Foreman put out a set of four EPs titled and themed after the seasons. Each was six songs long, and after being released one at a time, they were later packaged as pairs. Fall and Winter thus became the first set. Foreman's rock credentials were a mile long by this point, so he made it clear that the only ...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Jared Johnson
Anyone who wondered what Switchfoot's frontman would sound like sans the band's wall of distortion finally got their answer -- a stripped down set of rewarding indie rock that showed more facets of the songwriter than most knew could be possible. After a decade pioneering Switchfoot's multi-platinum crossover success from Christian novelty act to arena headliners, Jon Foreman put out a set of four EPs titled and themed after the seasons. Each was six songs long, and after being released one at a time, they were later packaged as pairs. Fall and Winter thus became the first set. Foreman's rock credentials were a mile long by this point, so he made it clear that the only reason he put out an extensive solo collection was that the material fit "outside the Switchfoot aesthetic." Once fans were assured that the band wasn't breaking up, they were in for some of the most well-crafted lo-fi rock anthems in years. What comes across most is Foreman's quest for meaning in the events of life, a quest that critics have accused him of watering down while composing for Switchfoot. Those themes are at the forefront of this journey, an exploration of death, sin, longing, corruption, and the courage to face these enemies head-on. Foreman recorded the tracks in his living room and threw in a variety of instrumentation, from mariachi brass to scattered percussion to even bass clarinet. For a singer who made his name on the modern rock charts, this departure was a pleasant, if not absolutely thrilling, surprise.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 1/15/2008
  • Label: Credential Rec.
  • EAN: 5099951615123
  • Catalog Number: 16151
  • Sales rank: 84,076

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Jon Foreman Primary Artist, Drums
Charlie Peacock Organ, Bass, Piano, Bass Guitar, Hammond Organ, Wurlitzer, Hammond B3
Jeff Coffin Clarinet, Bass Clarinet
Sam Ashworth Drums
Jerome Fontamillas Synthesizer, Piano, Synthesizer Strings
Stacy DuPree Vocals
Jeremy Lutito Drums
Keith Tutt II Cello
Kai Welch Trumpet
Technical Credits
Charlie Peacock Executive Producer
Richie Biggs Engineer
Jim DeMain Mastering
Tim Foreman Producer
Jon Foreman Composer, Producer, Engineer, Audio Production
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Stirring "comfort food"

    Touching and profound, Jon Foreman's themes and words deal with subjects outside of the usual 'genre' of acoustical musicians (ie: broken-hearted, mistreated love) packaged in refreshing originality of speech.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Moody, Moving Masterpiece: Jon Foreman's "Fall"

    It's been awhile since I was moved by an album as much as Jonathan Foreman's work, "Fall", the first of his "Limbs and Branches" series released in October 2008. The lead singer of the popular Christian rock band Switchfoot, Foreman certainly holds his own as he extends his songwriting endeavors into this brooding and personal collection. Most of my inspired musical experience has been linked to daydreaming; "Fall" hits on reality with the force of-borrowing one of the man's song titles-a south-bound train.

    Jon Foreman's musical style is the first thing that grabbed me, even before the brilliant, lucid lyrics and incisively universal themes. Fall has all the elements of 70's Simon-and-Garfunkel-style folk: Socially aware, sensitive (nearly to the point of being touchy), a music that a person could listen to over and over and still discover and appreciate new things about it. To make the album generationally relevant, this older mode merges with an edgy, alternative attitude, delivering a punch with its singular melancholy.

    Foreman's lyrics border on poetry; the CD insert notes that Foreman developed most of his songs in the wee hours of the morning, a time quite conducive to deep writing. It is very refreshing to hear a raw account of those feelings, having experienced many of them myself. Indeed, the theme of "Fall" is, appropriately, the fading of things loved, and the writer doesn't mince words in describing the darkness that accompanies it: "How miserable I am/I feel like a fruitpicker who arrived here after the harvest/There's nothing here at all/Nothing at all here that could placate my hunger" ("Equally Skilled," track 3).

    Most notable about "Fall" are the themes, the aforementioned being the main one. Foreman's CD bears no guise. When Foreman is sad, he says so. When he regrets, he says so. And while the listeners don't have to grapple with metaphors thick enough to cut with a knife, the songwriter doesn't just feed them all the intricacies of his mind with a pedantic sort of straight-shooting. The feelings are clear enough to where anyone can understand them, but, like good literature as well as good music, there are enough underlying beauties to be found that a person does have to do some thinking and searching to find them, making discovery of them all the more meaningful.

    I really only had one beef with this CD: The first time I listened through it, I found it inordinately depressing. The listener must pay close attention to the whole of Foreman's lyrics, as well as the arc of his songs throughout the complementary "Winter", "Spring", and "Summer" albums, to truly catch the spirit behind the sorrow. Foreman's songs alternate, just like King David's Biblical psalms, between lamenting the injustice of the world to praising God for the hope ultimately found in Him. Overall, the hope in Fall trumps the lamentation, though the latter is strong enough to leave a bad taste in non-discriminating listeners' mouths (or, a bad ringing in their ears?).

    Having listened to the entire "Limbs and Branches" series, I can confidently say that "Fall" is my favorite album. It is a satisfying listening experience musically, a provocative one lyrically and a solid one thematically. Jon Foreman is a true virtuoso in his musical realm and will have my support as long as the seasons change.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews