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Berlin: The Downfall 1945
     

Berlin: The Downfall 1945

3.2 39
by Antony Beevor
 

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780141032399
Publisher:
Penguin Books, Limited (UK)
Publication date:
06/28/2010
Pages:
489
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 7.50(h) x 1.40(d)

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The Fall of Berlin 1945 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 39 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a well researched and written account of the fall of Berlin. It fills a void somewhere between Cornelius Ryan's 'The Last Battle' (excellent for the casual historian) and Read and Fisher's 'The Fall of Berlin' (a more detailed and lengthy account). It's good mesh of historical background and personal experiences from the battle. Most of the criticisms I have read about the book seem more motivated by a 'Politically Correct' approach to history than by the truth. German atrocities throughout the war are well documented and are not the focus of this book. The Red Army DID (by all accounts save their own) engage in widespread rape and looting in eastern Germany and Berlin. Beevor gives a balanced account - he does not glorify German resistance, Nazism, or the Soviet advance. He simply tells what happened. Rape is a predominant theme in the book, but it was a predominant concern of the German women, and a fact of the war. This is a solid piece of work on one of the greatest human dramas in history. Don't let those with a hidden agenda steer away from this book.
RjP44 More than 1 year ago
Good read with new and interesting information especially relating to Russian Forces engaged in this final battle ....... Rp
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is very riveting account of the final months of the way and the Battle of Berlin. This book masterfully blends troop numbers, casualties, units etc… and all sorts of figures, with personal anecdotes ranging from Soviet soldier’s, to civilians, to Hitler. I think Mr. Beevor does a great job at telling the story of the chaos, barbarity and utter devastation that was the last major European battle in World War II. However, Beevor’s book is full of spelling and grammatical mistakes in both English and German that the editors should have corrected. That is a little nitpicky, but it was a little annoying. There are also very few notes. Also, the Nook ebook version keeps crashing. It isn’t a crash here and there, but almost after 30 pages it freezes and crashes. I have to reboot my Nook and when I open this book I find that the Nook has lost my page and is on an earlier stopping point. I have not had this much trouble from any other ebook on my nook. This is very annoying. However, overall I would say the book’s content is a 4.5, but the constant crashing lowers that score a lot.
D-Srein More than 1 year ago
This book is in my view one of the best books ever written about World War II. The book reads great and covers all angles related to the fall of Berlin to the Russians. More than just talking about the battles it creates a picture in your mind of what it must have been like to be a Russian or German soldier or civilian in East Prussia, Prussia and Germany; especially a woman knowing the Russians were seeking revenge and out of control for the German atrocities in the Ukraine and Russia...I could not put it down. Buy it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Provides realistic impression overall I would recommend this book to anyone. Of all books I read so far about the last year of WWII, this one I think is the closest to reality. It is basically in line with what I have heard from the veterans. If you want to get a good general understanding or feel about WWII in West Europe, please read this book. One caveat: it seems the author loathes the Soviets so much; it makes him to somewhat unconsciously favor the defendants over the attackers. For example, on one hand, the report of the Soviet ‘530-th Artillery Regiment leaving in front of their position 1800 German soldiers, nine burnt-out tanks, and seven half-tracks’ is called ‘an exaggerated claim’. On the other hand, the German report of just one soldier ‘untersharffuhrer SS Eugene Vanlot destroyed ten T-34 tanks in one(!) day’ is taken for granted. Also it’s hard to believe in that SS volunteers from Norway, France, Denmark, Holland, Flanders were in any way ‘motivated by their visceral hatred of Bolshevism’. This can’t be true, because they had never experienced any of the horrors of Soviet communism in their countries
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
good read
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
gets dense and dull but pretty good
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good detail. High in military facts. Lacking compassionate writing. Doesn't compare to Jon Toland's "The Last 10 Days of World War II."
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Azpooldude More than 1 year ago
The Fall of Berlin 1945 by Antony Beevor follows the End of World War II From Christmas 1944 until May of 1945, mainly on the Eastern Front. Well documented, it covers the armies of both Russia and Nazi Germany, its leaders and soldiers and how the civilians caught in the middle awaited the Soviet onslaught of millions of men and thousands of tanks and artillery. At this stage of the game, it was just a matter of time before the Soviet war machine made its final crushing blow. With Stalin at the helm, he knew that he wanted more than the defeat of the Nazis. There were many other prizes: gold, nuclear scientist, new countries to rule and exploit with an endless supply of slave labor. But, the biggest prize of all was the body of Adolf Hitler. Beevor takes the reader through the last days of the war and the ultimate capture of Berlin. Like many other times during the war there was politics involved. And this time was no different. Stalin feared that the Americans and the British would arrive in Berlin first so extra manpower was diverted to capture the city. Hence, Russian units that could have been more valuable at other locations were diverted to the Berlin corridor. At times units were firing at each other. Russian generals, Zukov in particular, was in competition with other Russian generals to claim the Berlin bragging rights. Soviet NKVD and SMERSH units had their hands full with POWs, deserters, and Stalin's orders to hide any activity at Hitler's bunker. Much is written on the atrocities of the Soviets as they advanced forward. Rape and pillaging were the rule rather than the exception. This is covered quite extensively in the book with graphic descriptions-so those with sensitive stomachs are pre-warned. Kind of comical is how Hitler was pulling at straws in the later days and even appointed the incompetent Heinrich Himmler to command Army Group Vistula. Also, many of his generals already had a defeatist attitude and Hitler thought that Wenck's 12th Army would come to the rescue. It never did. Little is mentioned about the fight in the West, as the focus in the book is about the East. The Fall of Berlin 1945 is an interesting book and is typical Beevor. This book is a good read as it covers both military and civilian perspectives. One thing that I like about his writing is that he covers the human aspects of the war and gives many personal accounts. This gives the reader more insight than the usual order of battle strategies found in many other books. Blending it in with the actual battles and day to day operations leads to an interesting read. This is where this book shines, as the tragedy and triumph of the war comes to a close. But, I would recommend reading his other books first as they all lead up to this climatic closure of the war. Robert Glasker
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Guest More than 1 year ago
There are relatively few historians around who can write in such an engaging style. Count Beevor up there with Mosier and Keegan and possibly Weinberg. The bare truth about the atrocities of the Red Army are refreshing, since most of the reviewers tend to participate in the boring and lame moral equivalent/wimp league argument that the German civilians 'deserved' to be raped, looted and crucified, how dare we have sympathy for those wretched 'Germans.' When there are a whole slew of historians whose books are sure cures for insomnia, Mr. Beevor's talent is something to be singled out.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you are a fan of Beevor's writing style then you should be pleased with this book. By no means is it his crowning achievement, but a solid easy read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Having a great interest in history, and not being a scholar on this particular subject, I found the book very informative, and thought provoking. I was first drawn in by the authors approach. So many books have been written, about the war in general, from the perspective of the Western Allies. I found it refreshing to get a detailed account of this battle from the eastern front. I know this subject is a lightening rod for some when it pertains to how each side has been portrayed. And I'm certain there may be some dicrepencies regarding details that people may have a great problem with. However, the authors explanations of the battles fought, the idiosyncrasies of major participants, soldiers, and common citizens, and the impending doom of The 3rd Reich, and its aftermath, are riveting.