The Fall of Canada: A Chapter in the History of the Seven Years' War [NOOK Book]

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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III MONTREAL DURING THE WINTER OF 1759-60 The distresses of the British in Quebec during this winter were surpassed by those of the French in Montreal. In this little town, which was almost the extreme outpost in New ...
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The Fall of Canada: A Chapter in the History of the Seven Years' War

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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III MONTREAL DURING THE WINTER OF 1759-60 The distresses of the British in Quebec during this winter were surpassed by those of the French in Montreal. In this little town, which was almost the extreme outpost in New France of European civilization, the defenders had gathered for the final rally against the invaders. Usually the town contained from eight to nine thousand inhabitants ; now, however, its population was greatly increased by refugees from all parts of Canada. Many of these refugees had come because they feared not only the British but also their own Indians, likely at any time to go over to the enemy and to commit brutal outrages against their former friends. The savages were, it was said, particularly incensed against Vaudreuil, as the cause of the misfortunes in which they found themselves included, and threatened to kill him. Leading citizens from Quebec were now in Montreal, and the Bishop of Quebec ruled his church from that place. In Montreal was also what remained in Canada of a Court, which once had imitated Versailles. An appearance of old- world luxury marked this town on the edge of the wilderness. ' From the number of silk robes, laced coats, and powdered heads of both sexes, and almost of all ages, that are perambulating the streets from morning till night,' says Captain Knox, who saw the place in the autumn of 1760, ' a stranger would be induced to believe that Montreal is intirely inhabited by people of independent and plentiful fortunes.' Some years earlier, the Swedish traveller Kalm had described the inhabitants of Montreal as ' well-bred andMONTREAL DURING THE WINTER OF 1759-60 85 courteous, with an innocent and becoming freedom ' ; to Knox, who saw them under the shadow of defeat, they appeared cheerful and sprightly. Their town stret...
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940023984162
  • Publisher: The Clarendon Press
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Digitized from 1914 volume
  • File size: 515 KB

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CHAPTER III MONTREAL DURING THE WINTER OF 1759-60 The distresses of the British in Quebec during this winter were surpassed by those of the French in Montreal. In this little town, which was almost the extreme outpost in New France of European civilization, the defenders had gathered for the final rally against the invaders. Usually the town contained from eight to nine thousand inhabitants ; now, however, its population was greatly increased by refugees from all parts of Canada. Many of these refugees had come because they feared not only the British but also their own Indians, likely at any time to go over to the enemy and to commit brutal outrages against their former friends. The savages were, it was said, particularly incensed against Vaudreuil, as the cause of the misfortunes in which they found themselves included, and threatened to kill him. Leading citizens from Quebec were now in Montreal, and the Bishop of Quebec ruled his church from that place. In Montreal was also what remained in Canada of a Court, which once had imitated Versailles. An appearance of old- world luxury marked this town on the edge of the wilderness. ' From the number of silk robes, laced coats, and powdered heads of both sexes, and almost of all ages, that are perambulating the streets from morning till night,' says Captain Knox, who saw the place in the autumn of 1760, ' a stranger would be induced to believe that Montreal is intirely inhabited by people of independent and plentiful fortunes.' Some years earlier, the Swedish traveller Kalm had described the inhabitants of Montreal as ' well-bred andMONTREAL DURING THE WINTER OF 1759-60 85 courteous, with an innocent and becoming freedom ' ; to Knox,who saw them under the shadow of defeat, they appeared cheerful and sprightly. Their town stret...
Read More Show Less

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