The Fall of the House of Usher

( 13 )

Overview

In this story, the twins Roderick and Madeline Usher inhabit their ancestral home, which has become a house of doom and gloom. Moreover, the house is cracked and divided by a fissure that runs from the roof all the way down into the foundations. Roderick is a man of the world, who has returned home because he feels weak, agitated, nervous and a 'bounden slave' of his fear for the future. His twin-sister Madeline, who always lived to herself in the house, suffers from a mysterious disease that is characterized by ...
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The Fall of the House of Usher

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Overview

In this story, the twins Roderick and Madeline Usher inhabit their ancestral home, which has become a house of doom and gloom. Moreover, the house is cracked and divided by a fissure that runs from the roof all the way down into the foundations. Roderick is a man of the world, who has returned home because he feels weak, agitated, nervous and a 'bounden slave' of his fear for the future. His twin-sister Madeline, who always lived to herself in the house, suffers from a mysterious disease that is characterized by apathy, a gradual wasting away and attacks of catalepsy. The sinister and exited physician of the family is powerless against this disease. After one of the catalepsy attacks Roderick declares his sister dead and temporarily entombs her in a cellar under the house. However, Madeline isn't dead and after she awakens from her stupor she breaks out of the cellar and violently attacks her brother, killing him and herself. After this double murder-suicide, the fissure rapidly widens and the house collapses into the waters of the deep tarn in which it once stood.

A visitor to a gloomy mansion finds a childhood friend dying under the spell of a family curse.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781500590260
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
  • Publication date: 7/20/2014
  • Pages: 50
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Edgar Allan Poe (1809 - 1849)was a multifaceted writer: poet, short story writer, novelist, and critic. His Gothic masterpieces "The Fall of the House of Usher" and "Ligeia" for many years consigned him as a master of the Gothic genre. But his work is much wider than that. Besides a life of intellectual and artistic activity, Poe lived a colorful and adventurous life.
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Read an Excerpt

DURING the whole of a dull, dark, and soundless day in the autumn of the year, when the clouds hung oppressively low in the heavens, I had been passing alone, on horseback, through a singularly dreary tract of country, and at length found myself, as the shades of the evening drew on, within view of the melancholy House of Usher. I know not how it was--but, with the first glimpse of the building, a sense of insufferable gloom pervaded my spirit. I say insufferable; for the feeling was unrelieved by any of that half-pleasurable, because poetic, sentiment, with which the mind usually receives even the sternest natural images of the desolate or terrible. I looked upon the scene before me--upon the mere house, and the simple landscape features of the domain--upon the bleak walls--upon the vacant eye-like windows--upon a few rank sedges--and upon a few white trunks of decayed trees--with an utter depression of soul which I can compare to no earthly sensation more properly than to the after-dream of the reveller upon opium--the bitter lapse into every-day life--the hideous dropping off of the veil. There was an iciness, a sinking, a sickening of the heart--an unredeemed dreariness of thought which no goading of the imagination could torture into aught of the sublime. What was it--I paused to think--what was it that so unnerved me in the contemplation of the House of Usher? It was a mystery all insoluble; nor could I grapple with the shadowy fancies that crowded upon me as I pondered. I was forced to fall back upon the unsatisfactory conclusion, that while, beyond doubt, there are combinations of very simple natural objects which have the power of thus affecting us, still the analysisof this power lies among considerations beyond our depth. It was possible, I reflected, that a mere different arrangement of the particulars of the scene, of the details of the picture, would be sufficient to modify, or perhaps to annihilate its capacity for sorrowful impression; and, acting upon this idea, I reined my horse to the precipitous brink of a black and lurid tarn that lay in unruffled lustre by the dwelling, and gazed down--but with a shudder even more thrilling than before--upon the remodelled and inverted images of the gray sedge, and the ghastly tree-stems, and the vacant and eye-like windows.

Nevertheless, in this mansion of gloom I now proposed to myself a sojourn of some weeks. Its proprietor, Roderick Usher, had been one of my boon companions in boyhood; but many years had elapsed since our last meeting. A letter, however, had lately reached me in a distant part of the country--a letter from him--which, in its wildly importunate nature, had admitted of no other than a personal reply. The MS. gave evidence of nervous agitation. The writer spoke of acute bodily illness--of a mental disorder which oppressed him--and of an earnest desire to see me, as his best and indeed his only personal friend, with a view of attempting, by the cheerfulness of my society, some alleviation of his malady. It was the manner in which all this, and much more, was said--it was the apparent heart that went with his request--which allowed me no room for hesitation; and I accordingly obeyed forthwith what I still considered a very singular summons.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 13 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 18 of 13 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2004

    Trembling with fear page turner

    This book was very amusing. A high quality of confusing vocabulary. Keeps you on the edge of your seat especially the ending! Overall this was a very scary story that will interest all fans of horror.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 18, 2011

    Interesting

    I had to read this for my American Literature class.Definitely spooked me!I really enjoyed it.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2011

    Spooky

    Don't read inn the late evening,or night.difficult too understand some of the sentences that he wrote.good story line and a must for reading around halloween time.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2001

    A Must Have for Horror Fans.

    Poe's horrifying tale will grip readers and leave them feeling uneasy, yet satisfied in experiencing his literary genius.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2000

    good book

    i thought this was a good book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2014

    Edgar

    Edgar is very strange because he had a bad life. He loved his mother more than anything. She died, and Edgar was very dipressed. He put all his feelings in the stories he wrote. Then he got engaged, the wife died too. Edgar was so depressed. That is all I am going to say.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2013

    The fallen house of usher

    Cool book of all time

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2010

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    Posted March 27, 2011

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    Posted December 29, 2009

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    Posted March 21, 2011

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    Posted January 6, 2010

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    Posted August 29, 2013

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