Fallen Gods

Fallen Gods

3.3 15
by Michael A. Martin
     
 

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Though the United Federation of Planets still reels from Andor’s political decision that will forever affect the coalition, Captain William T. Riker and the crew of the U.S.S. Titan are carrying out Starfleet’s renewed commitment to deep space exploration. While continuing to search the Beta Quadrant’s unknown expanses for an ancient…  See more details below

Overview

Though the United Federation of Planets still reels from Andor’s political decision that will forever affect the coalition, Captain William T. Riker and the crew of the U.S.S. Titan are carrying out Starfleet’s renewed commitment to deep space exploration. While continuing to search the Beta Quadrant’s unknown expanses for an ancient civilization’s long-lost quick-terraforming technology— a potential boon to many Borg-ravaged worlds across the Federation and beyond—Titan’s science specialists encounter the planet Ta’ith, home to the remnant of a once-great society that may hold the very secrets they seek. But this quest also takes Titan perilously close to the deadly Vela Pulsar, the galaxy’s most prolific source of lethal radiation, potentially jeopardizing both the ship and what remains of the Ta’ithan civilization. Meanwhile, Will Riker finds himself on a collision course with the Federation Council and the Andorian government, both of which intend to deprive Titan of its Andorian crew members. And one of those Andorians—Lieutenant Pava Ek’Noor sh’Aqaba—has just uncovered a terrible danger, which has been hiding in plain sight for more than two centuries. . . .

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781451660630
Publisher:
Pocket Books
Publication date:
07/31/2012
Series:
Star Trek: The Next Generation Series
Sold by:
SIMON & SCHUSTER
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
368
Sales rank:
253,103
File size:
1 MB

Meet the Author

Michael A. Martin's solo short fiction has appeared in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. He has also coauthored (with Andy Mangels) several Star Trek comics for Marvel and Wildstorm and numerous Star Trek novels and eBooks, including the USA Today bestseller Titan: Book One: Taking Wing; Titan: Book Two: The Red King; the Sy Fy Genre Award-winning Star Trek: Worlds of Deep Space 9 Book Two: Trill -- Unjoined; Star Trek: The Lost Era 2298 -- The Sundered; Star Trek: Deep Space 9 Mission: Gamma: Vol. Three: Cathedral; Star Trek: The Next Generation: Section 31 -- Rogue; Star Trek: Starfleet Corps of Engineers #30 and #31 ("Ishtar Rising" Books 1 and 2); stories in the Prophecy and Change, Tales of the Dominion War, and Tales from the Captain's Table anthologies; and three novels based on the Roswell television series. His most recent novels include Enterprise: The Romulan War and Star Trek Online: The Needs of the Many.

His work has also been published by Atlas Editions (in their Star Trek Universe subscription card series), Star Trek Monthly, Dreamwatch, Grolier Books, Visible Ink Press, The Oregonian, and Gareth Stevens, Inc., for whom he has penned several World Almanac Library of the States nonfiction books for young readers. He lives with his wife, Jenny, and their two sons in Portland, Oregon.

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Fallen Gods 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 15 reviews.
trekbooklover More than 1 year ago
This Titan book confused me from beginning to end. I have a question for Mr. Martin: what happened to the fun loving adventures of Riker and Troi? This novel made me feel confused and had a hard time following the plotlines in this novel.
leatherpaws More than 1 year ago
I find the reviews on this series (and this book in particular) harder to read than most folks claim the book itself is. One person actually claims that the sentences were too long (would "This is Riker, this is Troi, see Riker chase Troi" be better?) and a few of the reviews were so bad as far as wording, spelling, and sentence structure that I finally gave up. The one good thing that seems to have come from the series is that it may actually be the next Star Trek TV (or movie) series! Here's hoping!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Stupid
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
DametricP More than 1 year ago
This book fell a little flatter than most of the Titan books but I am still enjoying the series as a whole.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I_Want_To_Be_Sam More than 1 year ago
BORING where was the action?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love Star Trek and read everything I can but I almost stopped reading this one because of it's super long sentences. It is great to be descriptive but this is over the top. Story line is good.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Elantraboi More than 1 year ago
This book was tough to review because I honestly like half of the story. That, however, was the problem; there were two distinct and completely unrelated stories. Important disclaimer first: If have not read previous books in the Star Trek Titan series or in expanded Star trek Universe, this book will absolutely make no sense to you. Did I scare everyone off? Ok then. Fallen Gods, as previously mentioned, is two distinct stories - a ship-side story and a scary alien planet story. The ship in the bottle story dealt with the recent secession of Andor, one of the Federation's founding worlds. Because of this, Starfleet has issued recall orders for Titan's Andorian offices. To complicate matters, an Andorian starship arrives to repatriate these offices. If this book was just about this "ship" story, it would be a pretty good short story. The Andorian characters are faced with forced repatriation with Andor or the equivalent of internment in the Federation. True to Star Trek there is always a third option which Riker and Troi explore. There is also a satisfying twist in the story that left me ready for the next novel. If only it had been that simple. The 2nd story takes place on the planet that the Titan is investigating. The planet in question is dying due to its proximity to a pulsar emitting lethal radiation. The people, who are never really described well beyond the fact that they are bug like creatures are locked in a political struggle of their own. The Preservationists want to save the technology of their fallen while the Thrashers want to destroy the technology that they fear as magic. Their salvation comes from the melding of minds between two of Titan’s officers and the planet's technology. No really, THAT is the B story. It's and story in the Star Trek universe and it was not told very well. I was severely tempted to skip the portions of the story that took place on the planet. I simply did not care about the fate of Preservers or the Thrashers, and, honestly, neither did the author. Another fatal flaw is the loads and loads of characters in the Titan series. Personally, Star Trek books are my "in-between" books because it is easy to visualize characters, plot, and setting. The series had so many characters from so many species it is difficult to keep track of who I am supposed to care about. The cast characters are made diverse for sake of being diverse. It is ultimately distracting. My best advice is to only read this if you are a rabid Star Trek fan; even then, only read the Andorian plotline.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a great continuation of the Titan series.
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