The Falling Raindrop

( 1 )

Overview

As a storm rumbles and flashes, something wonderful happens up in the clouds: a raindrop begins his journey to earth, thrilled and delighted to be flying. But when flying begins to feel like falling, the raindrop can’t enjoy himself for fear that a big change is coming.
 
After hitting a campfire on the ground, the raindrop begins his journey back to the clouds as a wisp of steam. Readers will cheer for the little raindrop, experiencing ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (29) from $1.99   
  • New (13) from $5.50   
  • Used (16) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

As a storm rumbles and flashes, something wonderful happens up in the clouds: a raindrop begins his journey to earth, thrilled and delighted to be flying. But when flying begins to feel like falling, the raindrop can’t enjoy himself for fear that a big change is coming.
 
After hitting a campfire on the ground, the raindrop begins his journey back to the clouds as a wisp of steam. Readers will cheer for the little raindrop, experiencing his joys as well as his worries. This simple story uses spare text and art to explain the science of the water cycle, while happily showing that good things can result from change.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Review, The Wall Street Journal, March 20, 2010:
"The charm of this picture book for children ages 4 to 8 lies in the arresting simplicity of its design."

Review, Publishers Weekly:
"This debut, the collaborative project of two advertising executives, has a crisp, carefully produced feel, and it delivers its message with razor-sharp effectiveness.... It’s a metaphor for the way so many adults live: fearful and worried about death. Do children worry this way, too? Some do, and they’ll take comfort in the unexpected fate of the raindrop."

Review, School Library Journal:
"The minimalist artwork is surrounded by huge spans of creamy white paper. Other than the orange of the fire, grays and baby blues are the only colors used in the iconic images of the clouds, thunder, wind, and raindrops. Readers will enjoy the character’s humorous expressions in this unique presentation."

Children's Literature - Beverley Fahey
As a storm raged below, high in a cloud a small raindrop was born. Shouting "I'm alive!" he plunged to the earth happily and with wild abandon. Suddenly, his exuberance vanished as fear took hold and he worried about falling on a rock or a house or in a field. As apprehension consumed him, the raindrop missed out on all the joy and excitement that free falling and racing with other raindrops should have brought. Alone and frightened, he saw a red glow far below him and crashed into a roaring campfire. At first, there was nothing; then a small cloud appeared, followed by a "wisp of steam." Upward the steam rose, and the raindrop knew he would join the clouds to fall another day. This is certainly a unique and whimsical explanation of the water cycle that will have great appeal among the very young. The raindrop's inability to live in the excitement of the moment and his preoccupation with his fears may be too abstract for children. The marrying of text to illustration is masterfully executed. Cream-colored pages with minimum large black typeface show only a small blue anthropomorphic raindrop moving closer to the earth. Rapidly fanning the pages that chronicle his journey can turn this section into mini flipbook. The bright red campfire explodes from the page, making the raindrop's crash landing more intense and final. His "rebirth" will have children cheering. This is brilliant in its simplicity. Reviewer: Beverley Fahey
Publishers Weekly
This debut, the collaborative project of two advertising executives, has a crisp, carefully produced feel, and it delivers its message with razor-sharp effectiveness. The illustrations are small vignettes that appear in the center of cream-colored pages, forcing readers to pay attention. At the center of the story is a pale blue cartoon raindrop. He spends most of the story plummeting toward Earth, as streaks and droplets peel off him, demonstrating his speed. Initially, he delights in his flight (“I’m alive!” he cries, with an open smile. “He felt like he was flying as he whizzed down through the clouds”), but his joy soon turns to fear that he’s hurtling to his doom. And in the process: “He missed out on the fun of skimming through the clouds. He missed out on the joy of riding on the wind.” It’s a metaphor for the way so many adults live: fearful and worried about death. Do children worry this way, too? Some do, and they’ll take comfort in the unexpected fate of the raindrop. Ages 3–6. (Mar.)
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—The water cycle is presented in the most basic terms: a single drop forms, falls, changes to steam, and returns to the atmosphere ready to begin the cycle again. This is no ordinary raindrop, however. Anthropomorphized, it is "born," not formed. With a "gasp" and a "smile," it flies diagonally across the page, gaining speed and building tension. The raindrop's initial joy turns to sadness when it recognizes that it may actually be falling. As other raindrops speed merrily by, its expression morphs from terror to worry and back again. When a bright orange glow appears far below, its fate is sealed. It lands in the large campfire, and then quickly reappears as a "wisp of steam." With this rebirth, the now-ecstatic raindrop realizes that it will "join the clouds and become a raindrop once again." The minimalist artwork is surrounded by huge spans of creamy white paper. Other than the orange of the fire, grays and baby blues are the only colors used in the iconic images of the clouds, thunder, wind, and raindrops. Readers will enjoy the character's humorous expressions in this unique presentation.—Carol S. Surges, McKinley Elementary School, Wauwatosa, WI
Kirkus Reviews
Minimalist art and spare text create a narrative based on the water cycle, which is briefly explained in the front matter, but this is less a science book than a philosophical treatise on living in the moment and hoping for the best. Grey watercolor storm clouds gather, and a falling raindrop's initial joy and excitement fades as he begins to worry about his fate. His anxiety about "crashing into a rock / or a road / or a field / or a house" causes him to miss the excitement and fun of the fall. Ultimately, landing in a campfire allows the raindrop to rise up again as a wisp of steam, alleviating his concerns and allowing him to anticipate his transformation back into a raindrop. The visual narrative reads like film animation, with some page turns at the beginning resembling flip-book art in their quick succession. While the book sometimes struggles to resolve its message, story and aesthetic, this will serve as a fine read aloud and as a different spin on the water cycle. (Picture book. 4-7)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781582463124
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 3/23/2010
  • Pages: 48
  • Sales rank: 260,387
  • Age range: 3 - 7 Years
  • Lexile: AD510L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 9.80 (w) x 9.80 (h) x 0.36 (d)

Meet the Author

NEIL JOHNSON is a director for an international advertising firm in Singapore. About The Falling Raindrop Neil says, “My son was petrified of lightning, thunder, and rain. One afternoon, standing at the window while it poured outside, he asked me if the raindrops were scared, too. The answer became this story.”
 
JOEL CHIN is an art director for the same advertising firm. He and Neil worked on this book while putting in long hours “bouncing” ad campaign ideas. Growing up in tropical Asia has allowed Joel to experience rain showers almost daily. He says that the raindrop “shows how one should live life to the fullest, a simple metaphor for life.”
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

It was a stormy day.
 
Dark clouds gathered.
 
The wind howled.
Lightning flashed.
 
And thunder boomed.
As the storm rumbled and shook, something wonderful happened in the clouds:
a raindrop was born.
 
With a little gasp and a big smile, the raindrop began to fall.
“I’m alive!” he shouted.
He felt like he was flying as he whizzed down through the clouds.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 11, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Preschool science and philosophy lesson -- neat trick!

    A personable little raindrop falls from a cloud, thrilled to be flying until he realizes he's not flying, he's falling and this quirky story shifts gears, morphing into a meditation on . . . Embracing change? Overcoming obstacles? Rolling with the punches? Some kids might get concerned as our friendly droplet plummets into a blazing campfire, but he/it quickly turns to steam and returns to the sky -- an anthropomorphized lesson on the water cycle. Hmmm. The design of this book is easier to embrace wholeheartedly than the metaphorical story line which may sail over the heads of the water cycle crowd. Square, creamy pages sport minimal illustrations -- mostly just the tiny, pale-blue raindrop careening diagonally toward doom, I mean, rebirth.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)