The Falling Sky: The Science and History of Meteorites and Why We Should Learn to Love Them

( 4 )

Overview

Meteorites are the stuff of legend, interpreted both as omens of doom and objects of power. But it was only in the eighteenth century that the study of falling space debris became a science and began unlocking the mysteries of the universe.
 
Now new research suggests that the Earth was bombarded with meteorites 470 million years ago from an enormous collision in the Asteroid Belt, which orbits the sun between Mars and Jupiter. And a ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$17.81
BN.com price
(Save 28%)$24.95 List Price
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (12) from $5.20   
  • New (6) from $8.54   
  • Used (6) from $5.20   
The Falling Sky: The Science and History of Meteorites and Why We Should Learn to Love Them

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$11.49
BN.com price
(Save 42%)$19.99 List Price

Overview

Meteorites are the stuff of legend, interpreted both as omens of doom and objects of power. But it was only in the eighteenth century that the study of falling space debris became a science and began unlocking the mysteries of the universe.
 
Now new research suggests that the Earth was bombarded with meteorites 470 million years ago from an enormous collision in the Asteroid Belt, which orbits the sun between Mars and Jupiter. And a revolutionary theory is emerging, stating that the bombardment resulted in the single greatest increase in biological diversity on the planet since the origin of life.
 
Introducing these discoveries to the general public for the first time, Ted Nield challenges the view that meteorite strikes are bad news for life on Earth. He argues, for example, that the infamous K-T extinction event that everyone thinks wiped out the dinosaurs isn’t the whole picture, that the causes of the mass extinction were much more diverse and complex. By examining the history of meteorites, Nield shows how our interpretations of space matter have varied and how the impacts received fresh urgency with the advent of the atom bomb. Invoking a cast of fascinating characters alongside a wealth of extraordinary research, this is the perfect introduction to the science and history of the falling sky.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Fascinating . . . rich in detail, informative, and entertaining . . . an insightful account.”

Nature magazine

“Another scrupulously researched and cleverly assembled gem of explanation and revelation from Ted Nield, who is swiftly consolidating his reputation as the go-to guy for the unraveling of geology’s most fascinating mysteries.”

—SIMON WINCHESTER

“A fascinating account of how the arrival of extraterrestrial objects has influenced the history of life on Earth.”

—Richard Fortey, winner of the Lewis Thomas Prize for science writing and winner of the Royal Society's Michael Faraday Prize for the public communication of science

“Nobody writes better on matters geological than Ted Nield, and he has now broadened his scope to include impacts from space and the evolution of life on Earth. His gripping account of how the two seemingly disparate phenomena are related and how we may owe our existence to such impacts is a scientific page-turner of the best kind, rich with personal insights and anecdote as well as with sober (and not so sober) facts.”

—John Gribbin, author of In Search of Schrödinger's Cat

“Science for real at its very best.”

—David Bellamy, current or past president of the UK Conservation Foundation, Wildlife Trusts Partnership, National Association for Environmental Education, and the Galapagos Conservation Trust

“A witty and lively account not just of the perils of asteroids but also of their many mysteries. A entertaining story, delightfully told.”

—Gabrielle Walker, former climate change editor at Nature and former features editor of The New Scientist

“A splendid book.  Nield recounts the dramatic and often amusing story of our encounters with the ‘thunderstones’ but goes far beyond this. There is much fascinating science involved in the discovery of where in our solar system meteorites come from and what set them on a collision course with Earth throughout its history.”

—Aubrey Manning, professor emeritus of natural history at Edinburgh University, president of the Royal Society of Wildlife Trusts, and winner of the Zoological Society of London Silver Medal for public understanding of science

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780762778287
  • Publisher: Globe Pequot Press
  • Publication date: 10/18/2011
  • Pages: 304
  • Product dimensions: 6.20 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Ted Nield is the author of Supercontinent and is the editor of Geoscientist magazine. Former chair of the Association of British Science Writers, he is a fellow of the Geological Society. 

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2013

    Torando twister team

    Leader kiersten

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2013

    Wonder

    Wonder

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2012

    Write more

    I love it!!!! It 5,000,000,000 rwating!!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2012

    Misty's story

    ~four moons after the first part...~ I woke up to the bright sunlight that poured from the windows (I had learned the word window along with many other words from being at he twoleg place for so long JTLYK) and flooded the room. I shrunk from the light, not wanting to be bothered by it's rays, and headed over to my food bowl. I munched on the hard chewy stuff then stretched my jaw into a yawn and looked around. I decided some fresh spring air would do me some good. Slipping through the cat door, I could immediately tell the difference. My human's domain had been stuffy and humid, but outside the aroma of flowers and fresh air wafted around. I padded through the garden, glancing about the roses and blue-bells. My pace was slow, making the sensation of the soft grass beneath the pads of my feet last. As I faced the glare of the sun, I realized there was something different about the day. Something almost... solemn. It was cloudy but I didn't think that was quite it. I couldn't be sure. My human appeared at the door and called a few things, most that I couldn't understand. I did recognize my nane though. Faith. That's what my human had named me. I decided I would come in later since I was busy enjoying myself. A few birds fluttered about, and I watched with curiousity. I jumped onto the picket fence for a better veiw, but when I glaced down I was surprised to see another face staring back up at me. I lost my balance and fell onto the ground of the garden. I peeked through a knot-hole in the fence and saw that a cat was lying on the ground, leaves and brambles sticking to its matted bloody fur. I pursuaded myself to leap onto the fence and then on to the other side. I cautiously sniffed the cat's silver fur, wondering if he was dead. He scented different than I did, and certainly reeked of blood and other sorts of things. Maybe he was dead. I turned to leave but was startled when the cat shifted and groaned. "Greyclan," he managed then fell unconsious.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)