False Colours [NOOK Book]

Overview

The Honourable Christopher Fancot is forced into an outrageous masquerade by the tangled affairs of his wayward family.

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False Colours

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Overview

The Honourable Christopher Fancot is forced into an outrageous masquerade by the tangled affairs of his wayward family.

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Editorial Reviews

Queue My Review
Filled with some very unexpected surprises and quirky characters, I kept a smile on my face several minutes after I finished the novel. False Colours is not only a book written about the romance between Kit and Cressy, but also about relationships, duty and the power of love that sends a strong, warm message throughout the book.
— Shellie
Jane Austen Today
Heyer's eye for detail, character development, and talent for moving a story along is masterful... For sheer fun and entertainment, I highly recommend this novel and give it my highest rating of three regency fans.
— Vic Sandborn
From the Publisher
"Filled with some very unexpected surprises and quirky characters, I kept a smile on my face several minutes after I finished the novel. False Colours is not only a book written about the romance between Kit and Cressy, but also about relationships, duty and the power of love that sends a strong, warm message throughout the book." - Queue My Review

"Heyer's eye for detail, character development, and talent for moving a story along is masterful... For sheer fun and entertainment, I highly recommend this novel and give it my highest rating of three regency fans." - Jane Austen Today

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781402225253
  • Publisher: Sourcebooks, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 3/1/2008
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 76,994
  • File size: 952 KB

Meet the Author

Author of over fifty books, Georgette Heyer is the best-known and best-loved of all historical novelists, who made the Regency period her own. Her first novel, The Black Moth, published in 1921, was written at the age of fifteen to amuse her convalescent brother; her last was My Lord John. Although most famous for her historical novels, she also wrote eleven detective stories. Georgette Heyer died in 1974 at the age of seventy-one.
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Read an Excerpt

Excerpt from Chapter 1

It was past two o'clock when the job-chaise turned into Hill Street; and, as the watchman wending his way round Berkeley Square monotonously announced, a fine night. A full moon rode in the cloudless sky, dimming the street-lamps: even, as the solitary traveller had noticed, in Pall Mall, where gaslighting had replaced the oil-burners. Linkmen, carriages, and light streaming from an open door on the east side of Berkeley Square indicated that not all the members of the ton had left London; but at the end of June the Season was drawing to a close; and it did not surprise the traveller to find Hill Street deserted. It would not have surprised him if the knocker had been removed from the door of a certain house on the north side of the street, but when the chaise drew up a swift scrutiny reassured him: the Earl of Denville's town residence had not yet been abandoned for the summer months. The traveller, a young man, wearing a tasselled and corded Polish greatcoat, and a shallow-crowned beaver, sprang down from the chaise, dragged a bulging portmanteau from the floor of this vehicle, set it down on the flagway, and pulled out his purse. The postboys paid, he picked up the portmanteau, trod up the steps to the front-door, and gave the iron bell-pull a tug.

By the time the last echo of the clapper died away the chaise had disappeared, but no one had responded to the bell's summons. The traveller gave it a second, and more vigorous, tug. He heard it clanging somewhere in the nether regions, but was forced to conclude, after waiting for several minutes, that it had failed to rouse any of my lord's servants.

He considered the matter. It was possible, though unlikely, that the household had removed from London without taking the knocker from the door, or shuttering the windows. To verify that the windows had not been shuttered he retreated to the flagway, and scanned the house, perceiving that not only were all the windows unshuttered but that one of them, on the entrance-floor, had been left open a few inches at the top. This gave, as he knew, on to the dining-room; and to reach it presented a lithe and determined young man with no insuperable difficulty. Divesting himself of his greatcoat, and trusting that no watchman would come down the street in time to observe his clandestine entry, he proceeded to demonstrate to the uninterested moon that Colonel Dan Mackinnon, of the
Coldstream Guards, was not without a rival in the art of perilous climbing.

No such thought entered the Hon. Christopher Fancot's head: he was not acquainted with Colonel Mackinnon; and he did not think the feat of reaching the desired window-sill either dangerous or difficult. Once there it was easy to thrust up the lower sash, and to swing himself into the room. A couple of minutes later he emerged into the hall, where, upon a marble-topped side-table, he found a lamp burning low, with an unlit candle in a silver holder standing beside it. Observing these objects with an intelligent eye, Mr Fancot concluded that their noble owner had told his servants not to wait up for him. The subsequent discovery that the front-door was unbolted confirmed him in this belief. As he opened the door, to retrieve his belongings from the porch, he reflected, with an inward chuckle, that when his lordship did come home at last he would find his bed occupied by a most unlooked-for visitor, and would in all probability think that he was a great deal boskier than he had supposed.

On this thought, which appeared, from the mischievous smile which played about the corners of his mouth, to afford Mr Fancot amusement, he kindled the candle at the lamp's low flame, and made his way towards the staircase.

He went softly up, the candlestick held in one hand, his port¬manteau in the other, and his greatcoat flung over his shoulder. No creaking stair betrayed him, but as he rounded the bend in the second flight a door opened on the floor above, and a voice said anxiously: 'Evelyn?'

He looked up, seeing, in the light of a bedroom-candle held aloft in a fragile hand, a feminine form enveloped in a cloud of lace, which was caught together by ribbons of the palest green satin. From under a nightcap of charming design several ringlets the colour of ripe corn had been allowed to escape. The gentleman on the stairs said appreciatively:'What a fetching cap, love!'

The vision thus addressed heaved a sigh of relief, but said, with a gurgle of laughter:'You absurd boy! Oh, Evelyn, I'm so thankful you've come, but what in the world has detained you? I've been sick with apprehension!'

There was a quizzical gleam in the gentleman's eyes, but he said in accents of deep reproach: 'Come, come, Mama - !'

'It may be very well for you to say Come, come, Mama,' she retorted, 'but when you faithfully promised to return not a day later than -' She broke off, staring down at him in sudden doubt.

Abandoning the portmanteau, the gentleman shrugged the greatcoat from his shoulder, pulled off his hat, and mounted the remaining stairs two at a time, saying still more reproachfully: 'No, really, Mama! How can you be so unnatural a parent?'

'Kit!' uttered his unnatural parent, in a smothered shriek.'Oh, my darling, my dearest son!'

Mr Fancot, receiving his widowed mama on his bosom, caught her in a comprehensive hug, but said, on a note of laugh¬ter: 'Oh, what a rapper! I'm not your dearest son!'

Standing on tiptoe to kiss his lean cheek, and dropping wax from her tilted candle down the sleeve of his coat, Lady Denville replied with dignity that she had never felt the smallest prefer¬ence for either of her twin sons.

'Of course not! How should you, when you can't tell us apart?' said Mr Fancot, prudently removing the candlestick from her grasp.

'I can tell you apart!' she declared. 'If I had expected to see you I should have recognized you instantly! The thing was, I thought you were in Vienna.'

'No, I'm here,' said Mr Fancot, smiling lovingly down at her. 'Stewart gave me leave of absence: are you pleased?'

'Oh, no, not a bit!' she said, tucking her hand in his arm, and drawing him into her bedchamber.' Let me look at you, wicked one! Oh, I can't see you properly! Light all the candles, dearest, and then we may be comfortable. The money that is spent on candles in this house! I shouldn't have thought it possible if Dinting hadn't shown me the chandler's bill which, I must say, I wish she had not, for what, I ask you, Kit, is the use of know¬ing the cost of candles? One must have them, after all, and even your father never desired me to purchase tallow ones.'

'I suppose one might burn fewer,' remarked Kit, applying a taper to some half-dozen which stood in two chandeliers on the dressing-table.

'No, no, nothing more dismal than an ill-lit room! Light the ones on the mantelpiece, dearest! Yes, that is much better! Now come and tell me all about yourself !'

She had drifted over to an elegant day-bed, and patted it invit¬ingly, but Kit did not immediately obey the summons. He stood looking about him at the scene he had illumined, exclaiming: 'Why, how is this, Mama? You were used to live in a rose-garden, and now one would think oneself at the bottom of the sea!'
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 33 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 33 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 16, 2012

    Twins= imposter

    It's all to save face, of course, and to help save Mama from becoming impoverished. The humor is not slapstick, but comes from character and situation. One of this author's best

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 5, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    FALSE COLOURS - Lies possible betrayal - It makes you want to know

    This is the first time I have read a Georgette Heyer novel and I will read more of her books. This was a delightful story the characters were so nicely developed that you warmed to them and you wanted all of them to succeed in this charade that was forced on them. It will keep you alert and turning the pages as you see all the obstacles they must overcome and experience and the love and the humor of it all. It was well told.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2012

    A favorite

    Georgette Heyer is one of the best writers of the 20th century. This one is lots of fun. She embroils the hero in a mess and extricates him and his twin with finesse and style.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 11, 2012

    Georgette Heyer at her best

    False Colors is one of Georgette Heyer's best. Characters who are fun to know. Straightening everyone's various problems that become very entangled as the story moves along. Being a twin brings an extra set of problems along with financial difficulties and lovers and elderly crochets. All lighthearted and delightful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2012

    Very fun.

    A comedy of manners with masquerading twins, sweet but hedonistic fops, dragonish grannies, and boring relatives who blathernon about "economizing". The slang flies fast and furious!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 22, 2012

    A very good read

    Ms Heyer's strengths are her understanding of the time period and her ability to create believable and likeable characters. her work is dated by the sensibilities and prejudices of her time as well as that of the books' setting, but the stories are entertaining and well-written.

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  • Posted February 24, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Loved it!!

    I love all georgette Heyer books! This was a great book! A fun read!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2012

    Great book

    First G.H. book I read, and it made me an addict.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Love Georgette Heyer and this is a good one!

    The characters are so charming and funny. The plot is fun and surprising and all the standard Georgette types are here. The flighty faded beauty, the practical witty gal, the aging, corseted roue, and of course the handsome, wonderful guy and in this one they're twins so there are 2 kinds of guys both really handsome. Perfect for a rainy day.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2008

    False Colours

    I loved this book specially lady Denville who stole away the spotlight from the twins and the heroine Cressy in my opinion. She is beautiful, kind, simple, extravagant and had no clue in financing. In the meantime she loves her sons and they adore her. I loved the bond that the twins have for each other and how they come to each others rescue no matter what. The most funny part for me is when Lady Denville asks Rippley to marry her :) Just loved that part. What can I say Georgette Heyer is the best. Anna

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