A Family Daughter

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Overview

"It's 1979, and seven-year-old Abby, the youngest member of the close-knit Santerre family, is trapped indoors with the chicken pox during a heat wave. The events set in motion that summer will span decades and continents, as the Santerres become entangled with an aging French playboy, a young Eastern European prostitute, a spoiled heiress, and her ailing jet-set mother. Maile Meloy takes us through the world of this changeable family, its values and taboos, its heartbreak and bitterness and fierce devotion." A novel about passion and desire, ...
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A Family Daughter: A Novel

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Overview

"It's 1979, and seven-year-old Abby, the youngest member of the close-knit Santerre family, is trapped indoors with the chicken pox during a heat wave. The events set in motion that summer will span decades and continents, as the Santerres become entangled with an aging French playboy, a young Eastern European prostitute, a spoiled heiress, and her ailing jet-set mother. Maile Meloy takes us through the world of this changeable family, its values and taboos, its heartbreak and bitterness and fierce devotion." A novel about passion and desire, fear and betrayal, A Family Daughter illuminates both the joys and complications of contemporary life, and the relationship between truth and fiction.
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Editorial Reviews

Janet Maslin
A Family Daughter roams engrossingly from California to Paris to Buenos Aires in ways that make it a big book as well as a swift, slender, graceful one. And if the speed and gloss of Ms. Meloy's first novel suggested that she might be better suited to short stories, this new book has the deep ramifications of more ambitious fiction.
— The New York Times
The New Yorker
Continuing the family saga of her first novel, “Liars and Saints,” Meloy’s second follows Abby Collins from the age of seven, when her feckless mother and sober father separate, to her success as a young novelist. The kernel of the story is a melodrama involving her uncle Jamie, who rescues her first from the boredom of her childhood illness and then, later, from grief after the sudden death of her father. When a mutual sexual attraction develops, though, Abby must learn to rescue herself, which she does mainly by recasting the dilemmas of her extended family as a work of fiction. All this might easily come off as soap opera were Meloy not a wise and astonishing conjurer of convincing realities.
Valerie Sayers
Meloy is stretching, intellectually and artistically, and watching her take risks is often a pleasure. A Family Daughter is not always consistent and not always convincing, but it is ambitious and playful and clever. That's a fair enough literary bargain for any novel, retold or not.
— The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly
In evanescent scenes distinguished by clean, wry prose, Meloy observes the Santerre family, whom readers met in 2003's Liars and Saints, from a crafty new angle. The book opens as the deeply Catholic Yvette Santerre frets over her granddaughter, Abby, who has the chicken pox and has been deposited in Yvette's care while her mother, Clarissa, tries to remember what it's like to feel happy. Yvette and Teddy's eldest daughter, Margot, is repressed by her own Catholicism and veering into adultery; Clarissa thinks of her husband, Henry, and daughter, Abby, as "captors" keeping her from realizing her true potential; and happy-go-lucky son Jamie has little ambition beyond his next girlfriend. With Abby at the story's center, the narrative moves forward years in effortless leaps, revealing the secrets and dissatisfactions of all. From Abby's rocky childhood to her bruising young adulthood (her parents divorce; her father is killed in a car accident), she finds solace with Jamie, 12 years her senior. When Abby is 21, uncle and niece fall into an affair, until Jamie is lured away by the bored, rich, chronically unfaithful Saffron, who suffers her own difficult mother crisis in Argentina. Clarissa takes up with a lesbian and confronts her mother with recovered memories; Jamie becomes convinced he's actually Margot's daughter; and dreamy, conflicted Abby writes a roman clef (Liars and Saints!) about them all. Meloy shifts point of view fluently, and though her characters weather all sorts of melodrama, the novel itself feels light-poignant and affecting, meaningful yet somehow weightless. (Feb.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Fans of Meloy's previous novel, Liars and Saints, will be delighted with her latest effort. Meloy returns to the Santerre family, this time focusing on "family daughter" Abby and her emotional relationship with her uncle (or is it cousin?) Jamie. The novel moves from Abby's undergraduate days at the University of California, San Diego, where she grapples with her father's death, to Jamie's liaison with a Paris Hilton-like girlfriend, Saffron. Both Jamie and Abby accompany Saffron on a visit to her socialite mother, Josephine, who has retired to an estate in Argentina. There we meet Josephine's French business manager/lover and Katya, a Hungarian hooker and the mother of Josephine's adopted child. And that's just the beginning. An accomplished storyteller, Meloy weaves together these improbable twists without edging into silliness. She even toys with "reality" when Abby writes and publishes a novel that turns out to be Liars and Saints. This new work is enjoyable on its own, but those who have read Meloy's earlier effort can puzzle whether this book is a sequel or a revision. Highly recommended for popular fiction collections. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 10/1/05.]-Reba Leiding, James Madison Univ. Libs., Harrisonburg, VA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A thoroughly original and undeniably brilliant companion piece to Meloy's debut novel, Saints and Liars (2003). Meloy returns to the Senterres, the Catholic California family full of piety, passion and secrets at the center of the earlier novel. This go-'round, the family's passion and piety remain in place, but the secrets, and facts, have changed. The central character is now Yvette and Teddy Senterre's granddaughter Abby. When Abby is barely seven, her self-centered, irresponsible mother Clarissa leaves Abby and Abby's loving father Henry. Abby develops a crush on Uncle Jamie, Clarissa's charming, much younger brother. After Henry dies unexpectedly while in college, Abby falls apart emotionally. She and Jamie, a semi-ne'er-do-well, have a brief incestuous affair. Afterwards, Jamie takes up with Saffron, a neurotic heiress with commitment issues. Abby becomes involved with a teaching assistant, Peter, and begins writing a novel. Meanwhile, she accompanies Jamie and Saffron to Argentina, where Saffron's mother has adopted a Romanian orphan, T.J. When Saffron's mother dies, T.J. turns out to have a mother still very much alive. Jamie then adopts T.J., marries his mother and brings them to California, and when T.J.'s mother disappears for good, Jamie becomes a devoted single father. Abby moves back with Peter and publishes a highly autobiographical novel. Because Abby has changed crucial factual information about who did what to whom, the Santerres tell themselves she has not exposed their secrets, but the book forces them to face deeper truths. Meloy juxtaposes Abby's fictionalized account (Liars and Saints, described in enough detail for readers who have not read it) with the "reality"of this novel. And each novel stands alone; together they pack a seismic wallop.
From the Publisher
"Fast-moving and compelling...ambitious and playful and clever."
The Washington Post

"The Santerre family...includes so many appealing personalities, with all the dreams, hopes, and foibles of people we have loved at one time or another."
Los Angeles Times

"Wise and astonishing."
The New Yorker

"A big book as well as a swift, slender, graceful one."
The New York Times

"A seductive, absorbing read."
The Philadelphia Inquirer

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780743277662
  • Publisher: Scribner
  • Publication date: 2/14/2006
  • Pages: 336
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Maile Meloy

Maile Meloy is the author of the story collection Half in Love and the novel Liars and Saints, which was shortlisted for the 2005 Orange Prize. Meloy's stories have been published in The New Yorker, and she has received The Paris Review's Aga Khan Prize for Fiction, the PEN/Malamud Award, the Rosenthal Foundation Award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. She lives in California.

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    1. Hometown:
      Los Angeles, California
    1. Date of Birth:
      1972
    2. Place of Birth:
      Helena, Montana
    1. Education:
      M.F.A. in Fiction, University of California, Irvine, 2000

Read an Excerpt

In the summer of 1979, just when Yvette Santerre thought her children were all safely launched and out of the house, her granddaughter came to stay in Hermosa Beach and came down with a fever, and then a rash. Yvette thought it might be stress: Abby was seven, and her parents were considering divorce, and she must have sensed trouble. At bedtime she cried from homesickness, and Yvette asked if she wanted to go home. Abby said, "I want to go home, and I want to stay here."

The rash got worse, and Yvette's husband said they should tell Clarissa her daughter was sick. But Clarissa had gone back to Hawaii, where she had lived in Navy housing before Abby was born. She said it was the last place she had been happy, and she was staying somewhere without a telephone. So Yvette called Abby's father, up in Northern California.

"Oh, man," Henry said, when he heard.

"Was she exposed to anything?"

"I don't know," he said. "Let me talk to her."

"I think she has chicken pox."

"No, she can't have chicken pox," Henry said. Yvette imagined him on the other end, big and sandy-haired and invincible. It was one of the infuriating things about Henry: he thought he was immune to bad luck, and by extension his daughter was, too.

"Has she had it before?" Yvette asked.

"I don't think so," he said.

"Well, then, she can have chicken pox."

"Did you take her to the doctor?"

"I raised three children, Henry," she said. "I don't need a doctor to recognize chicken pox." Mrs. Ferris next door had already quarantined her own daughter from Abby. Yvette hadn't heard anything about an outbreak in Los Angeles.

"Put Abby on," Henry said.

Yvette gave the phone to the child, who held the receiver to her ear with both hands. Abby nodded, in answer to some question of her father's.

"You have to say it aloud," Yvette said. "Say yes."

"Yes," Abby said, into the phone. She turned toward the kitchen wall to have the conversation on her own.

Yvette washed Teddy's breakfast dishes and thought her husband seemed annoyed to have a sick child in the house again. It took her attention and drained her energy. She didn't want a divorce for her daughter, she wanted a time machine. There would be no Abby, without that dominating Henry, but there would be some other child -- a happier child -- and a marriage that wasn't doomed from the start. Her older daughter, Margot, had a husband who was kind and stalwart and patient: if only Clarissa had found a man like that. Yvette tried to accept that the way it had gone was God's plan.

Abby said good-bye to her father, and Yvette took the phone.

"I want you to take her to a doctor," Henry said.

"He'll want to know when she was exposed."

"Well, I don't know that," he said.

"Do you know where I can reach Clarissa?"

"Clarissa won't know."

"It's not going to be a very nice summer for Abby."

"Look," Henry said, "if she has chicken pox, it's not my fault. Kids get it sometime, right? And if she got some mystery rash at your house, it's really not my fault. Just please take her to the doctor and find out."

Yvette said tightly that she would.

Dr. Nye, in his office with poor Abby sitting shirtless on the white table, confirmed that it was chicken pox. He was a white-haired man in a clean white coat, who reminded Yvette of a parish priest back in Canada when she was a child. He wanted to know when Abby had been exposed.

"At least ten days ago," she said. "The only child she's seen here is Cara Ferris."

"Can I play with her yet?" Abby asked. Cara lived next door, and had blond ringlets, and had marched at the head of the Fourth of July parade, twirling a baton, as Miss Hermosa Beach Recreation. Abby worshiped her.

"Not until you're better, sweetheart," Yvette said.

"But Cara's had chicken pox," the doctor said.

"Her mother said it was such a slight case she could get it again."

Dr. Nye made a little scoffing noise. "Just keep Abby home," he said, "and use calamine. I'll pronounce her not contagious as soon as I can, and she can play with Miss Recreation."

The next day a heat wave started that broke Los Angeles temperature records, even in the beach towns. The air was stifling, the sky was pale with smog, and poor Teddy left for work, miserable in his dress shirt and tie. The best refuge was the pool, surrounded by cool sycamores, where the children played Jump or Dive, shouting at the last second what the child launched from the diving board should do and squealing with laughter at the midair scramble to obey. Abby lay on the living room couch, banned from the pool, staring miserably out the window as Cara pranced to the car in her blue swimsuit and her yellow curls, a rolled-up towel under her tanned little arm.

They still didn't know where Clarissa was. Yvette talked to Teddy about it in bed, but he was too tired to be worried. He had too much work, and was ready to retire. She stayed home with Abby on Sunday, and Teddy went to Mass alone. She knew it was dangerous to compare sisters, but Margot wouldn't have sent a sick child without warning. She had devoted her life to raising her two boys, and she would never be unreachable about them.

On the fourth day, Clarissa finally called. Polka-dotted with dried calamine lotion, Abby told her mother she couldn't go to the pool and then went back to doing puzzles in a book. Yvette took the phone.

"I think one of the neighbor kids might've had it," Clarissa said. "I forgot."

"She's your child. She's your first obligation."

"Don't start," Clarissa said. "I've been so unhappy."

"Everyone is unhappy sometimes."

"I didn't know -- " Clarissa began and trailed off.

"What?" Yvette snapped. "That there were responsibilities?"

"That my marriage would fall apart. That there would be such killing boredom. That I wouldn't get to do anything I wanted to do. I didn't know!"

Yvette stood at the kitchen counter wondering what part of her daughter's selfishness was her fault. Had she not given Clarissa enough attention when she was Abby's age? Had her other children distracted her -- Margot, who was older and perfect, and Jamie, who was younger and troubled? Yvette took a deep breath. She would love her daughter as God loved them both, with all of their flaws. "Are you finding what you want, there?" she asked.

"No," Clarissa said. "I'm in the most beautiful place in the world, and the first time I call, my kid has chicken pox. So I feel guilty and horrible. And I've felt guilty and horrible all week just in anticipation of something. I knew there was going to be something like this."

"You sound like you think it's my fault," Yvette said.

"No," Clarissa said, unconvincingly.

"I'm not asking you to come back," Yvette said. "She'll get better."

"I didn't think she'd get sick. She has to play with someone. That time alone is my sanity."

When Yvette hung up, she took a fresh glass of juice to the living room, where Abby lay on the couch reading a comic book. She was at the age to have communion, and she wasn't even baptized.

"Your mom said good-bye and to tell you she loves you," Yvette improvised.

"Where am I going to live now?"

Yvette pushed Abby's hair from her face. "I think you'll live with your mom."

"In Hawaii?"

"No, I think at home," Yvette said.

Abby looked at her pink-splotched knees. "With just my mom?"

Yvette sighed. "I don't know, sweetheart," she said.

Yvette kept the drapes drawn to keep the house cool, and the dimness increased Abby's gloom. Yvette tried to teach her to crochet, but Abby got frustrated with the yarn. They played Boggle and Go Fish. Sometimes, in bored wanderings through the house, Abby took pictures off the master bedroom wall and lay on the bed looking at them. She liked Yvette's wedding picture, with Teddy in his pilot's uniform during the war. And she liked a picture of the two girls: Clarissa with her dark hair coming out of its curls, and Margot standing behind her, polished and serene. Abby would study the pictures and then hang them back on the wall and turn on the TV. In the heat wave they were airing Coke and Pepsi and 7UP commercials, and Abby had memorized them all. She sang the jingles absently in the bath. It was killing Yvette.

At the end of the week, Yvette called Jamie, her youngest, who was in college in San Francisco. She begged him to come home.

"I'm taking a summer class," Jamie said.

"You should see her," Yvette said. "She's so miserable. Mrs. Ferris won't let her play with Cara. I could just wring that woman's neck."

"My car might not make it."

"I'll send Triple A," Yvette said.

He was home by late afternoon, with a duffel bag full of laundry that he dropped on the kitchen floor. Her handsome, mischievous boy: he had caused her so much trouble over the years, but now he had come when she needed him. She kissed his cheeks out of gratitude, as Abby sidled into the kitchen.

"Where's my favorite niece in the whole world?" Jamie asked.

Abby wrinkled her nose at him. "I'm your only niece."

Yvette noticed that Abby had washed the calamine off her face and arms, in honor of Jamie's arrival. She still had spots, but she didn't look like she was dying of a pink plague.

"Oh, yeah," Jamie said. "Well, if I had others, you'd still be my favorite. Want to hit the beach?"

"People might think I'm contagious," Abby said, solemnly.

"Are you?"

She shook her head no.

Jamie shrugged. "So who cares what they think?"

"I can't go in the waves alone," Abby said, more hopeful.

"I'll carry you in," he said. "Let's go, get your suit on."

Abby turned and nearly danced down the hallway to her room.

"Thank you," Yvette said to Jamie. "I can't tell you -- "

"No biggie," he said, opening the refrigerator. "That class was a drag anyway."

"Was it? I'm sorry."

"It's pretty much your fault," he said, but she could tell he was joking.

"You can take another class later."

"Sure." He closed the refrigerator.

"I'll go shopping."

"Looks good, Ma," he said. "I was just checking. Here she is, let's go."

He lifted Abby in her blue swimsuit onto his hip, as if she weighed nothing, and carried her out to the red Escort that used to be Teddy's.

Yvette followed with a twenty from her pocketbook. "After the beach, you can bring back ice cream for dessert."

Jamie snapped the bill for Abby. "Score!" he said.

Two hours later they came back, Abby sandy from the beach, with a tub of Dairy Queen ice cream and some Dilly bars that they rushed to the freezer. Abby chatted happily all through dinner, and it seemed to Yvette as if her cheerfulness were a wheel that Jamie had gotten spinning. Now he just needed to give it a push every so often, to keep it going.

"Thank you, Jamie," Yvette said, when she got her son alone. She couldn't remember when she had last thanked him for anything but Christmas presents, and now she couldn't stop.

Jamie moved into his old room and took Abby to the beach every morning. In the afternoons, he taught her five-card stud, sitting at the kitchen table with piles of unshelled peanuts.

"No eating your chips," he told her, "or we won't know who wins."

"You'll win," she said.

"I might not," he said. "I think you have a real talent for the bluff."

"No, I don't."

"You do!" he said. "Or you will when I get through with you. We can go on the road and win big -- you'll be the perfect hustler."

Abby laughed. Anything Jamie said was funny; anything he did was fun. He played guitar for her, making up songs with her name in them, and he made chords and let her strum. He listened to records in his room, and Abby sat on the floor, her dark head bent over the album covers.

One afternoon, Yvette was collecting laundry from Jamie's room, and his new Bob Dylan record was playing. Abby was studying the cover. Jamie lay on the bed, reading his old paperback copy of Dune. Bob Dylan sang:

You may be living in another country, under another name But you're gonna have to serve somebody.

"Why would you have another name?" Abby asked. Yvette took a towel off a doorknob.

"I guess if you did something wrong," Jamie said.

"So they wouldn't find you?"

"Right," Jamie said.

"But if they saw you, they would know you."

"That's why you live in another country."

Yvette bundled Jamie's clothes under her arm and said, "I live in another country, under another name."

Abby looked at her, astonished, and whispered, "Why?"

"I married Teddy, when he was a pilot in the war," Yvette said. "And I moved here from Canada and changed my name to his."

"That's not the same thing," Jamie said. "She didn't do anything wrong."

But it had felt wrong, leaving her father, who hadn't wanted her to go. "I did leave my family and my country," Yvette said. "And I never went back. I always thought I would."

Jamie shrugged in grudging acceptance. "Okay," he said to Abby, "so the song's about your grandma. It's about Canadians getting married and moving to California and serving the war effort and the holy Trinity."

"Oh, Jamie," Yvette said, and she laughed, embarrassed, and took the wash to the machine.

Yvette cooked Jamie's favorite meals -- enchiladas and chiles rellenos for dinner, poached eggs and toast soldiers for breakfast -- and they became Abby's favorites. When Clarissa or Henry called, Yvette was careful not to praise Jamie too much and make them feel they were being replaced, because she didn't see any benefit to their reclaiming their daughter yet. Abby was blissfully happy, and Jamie had a devotee and a life at the beach. If Henry was working, and Clarissa was off finding herself, then they were all where they wanted to be.

Copyright © 2006 by Maile Meloy

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Table of Contents

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Introduction

Reading Group Guide for A Family Daughter

1. A Family Daughter is the story of four generations of Santerres. Discuss the evolving parent-child relationships within each generation.

2. Discuss the themes of resurrection and resilience in the novel. Consider incidents such as Abby and Jamie's relationship, Saffron's baby, Margot's affair, and the family reunion at the end of the novel. What drives each character to overcome tragedy and adversity?

3. Why do you think the focus of the book, with the exception of Jamie, is on the women of the Santerre family? What is Yvette's role as family matriarch?

4. When thinking of the photographer, Yvette realizes that although they never had an affair, she and Teddy "had used him to make each other unhappy, and they were still using him." Do other characters use similar devices to hold grudges against each other?

5. Discuss the theme of sex and physical attraction in the novel. How does it influence each character in life-altering ways? Which characters use sex for comfort, and which use sex for power?

6. Following her father's death, Abby doesn't want contact with any of her family members except Jamie. Is this because he's closer to her age, or does she not feel comfortable with the rest of her family? Are they the only two members of the family who truly know and understand each other?

7. What do you think of Abby's decision to move from one "taboo" relationship to another? Is Abby drawn to older authority figures because her father died, or does she really love Peter? Abby tells Peter "I'm a different person with you and with my family . . ." Is this true? When do you think Abbyis happiest?

8. Why does Abby decide to write a novel so similar to her own story? Is this merely a cathartic exercise, or does she want her family to know about her affair with Jamie? Why doesn't the family seem too concerned about the incestuous relationship in Abby's book? Do they think it's fictional, or are they too afraid to ask if it's true? How does each character react to the way they're portrayed in the book?

9. Each character has a personal secret they keep from the others. Which characters do this to protect their family, and which characters keep secrets to protect themselves?

10. What role does guilt play in each character's life? Consider the Abby-Jamie relationship, Margot's adultery, Clarissa and Henry's divorce, and Yvette's decision to leave her family in Canada.

11. Yvette and Teddy raised their three children Catholic, but only Margot grew up to raise her children Catholic, as well. Why do you think this is? How would Clarissa and Jamie be different if they were religious? How would their children differ?

12. How are the members of the Santerre family affected by the various outsiders — Saffron, Martin, Fauchet, Katya — who pass in and out of their lives? What qualities do these supporting characters have that the Santerres lack?

13. How does the novel's unusual structure — alternating chapters told from many different points of view — strengthen the story? Why is it so important for this particular novel that we read almost every character's point of view?

If you've read both Liars and Saints and A Family Daughter:

1. A Family Daughter presents a different version of the Santerre family's history. How do these two versions differ? What are the differences between the Liars and Saints version of the truth and the A Family Daughter version of the truth (i.e., the identity of Jamie's mother; the details of Margot's family life; the deaths of Abby, Henry, Yvette, Teddy)? What reasons do you think the author had for presenting two different versions of this core story?

2. Are some of the characters' personalities different from book to book? If so, why do you think that is? Are their personalities different because the events in their lives are different, or are the events in their lives different because their personalities are different?

3. What truths and relationships are constant between the two books? How is their constancy significant to your reading of the two books?

4. Reading the two books together raises interesting questions about the nature of "truth" and its relationship with fiction. Do you think of one of these stories as the "real" story and one as made up? If so, why do you think that is, considering that, as novels, both stories are clearly fiction? Is your answer influenced by the order in which you read the two books?

Maile Meloy is the author of the story collection Half in Love and the novel Liars and Saints, which was shortlisted for the 2005 Orange Prize. Meloy's stories have been published in The New Yorker, and she has received The Paris Review's Aga Khan Prize for Fiction, the PEN/Malamud Award, the Rosenthal Foundation Award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. She lives in California.

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Reading Group Guide

Discussion Questions from the Publisher
1. A Family Daughter is the story of four generations of Santerres. Discuss the evolving parent-child relationships within each generation.

2. Discuss the themes of resurrection and resilience in the novel. Consider incidents such as Abby and Jamie's relationship, Saffron's baby, Margot's affair, and the family reunion at the end of the novel. What drives each character to overcome tragedy and adversity?

3. Why do you think the focus of the book, with the exception of Jamie, is on the women of the Santerre family? What is Yvette's role as family matriarch?

4. When thinking of the photographer, Yvette realizes that although they never had an affair, she and Teddy "had used him to make each other unhappy, and they were still using him." Do other characters use similar devices to hold grudges against each other?

5. Discuss the theme of sex and physical attraction in the novel. How does it influence each character in life-altering ways? Which characters use sex for comfort, and which use sex for power?

6. Following her father's death, Abby doesn't want contact with any of her family members except Jamie. Is this because he's closer to her age, or does she not feel comfortable with the rest of her family? Are they the only two members of the family who truly know and understand each other?

7. What do you think of Abby's decision to move from one "taboo" relationship to another? Is Abby drawn to older authority figures because her father died, or does she really love Peter? Abby tells Peter "I'm a different person with you and with my family . . ." Is this true? When do you think Abby is happiest?

8. Why does Abby decide to write a novel so similar to her own story? Is this merely a cathartic exercise, or does she want her family to know about her affair with Jamie? Why doesn't the family seem too concerned about the incestuous relationship in Abby's book? Do they think it's fictional, or are they too afraid to ask if it's true? How does each character react to the way they're portrayed in the book?

9. Each character has a personal secret they keep from the others. Which characters do this to protect their family, and which characters keep secrets to protect themselves?

10. What role does guilt play in each character's life? Consider the Abby-Jamie relationship, Margot's adultery, Clarissa and Henry's divorce, and Yvette's decision to leave her family in Canada.

11. Yvette and Teddy raised their three children Catholic, but only Margot grew up to raise her children Catholic, as well. Why do you think this is? How would Clarissa and Jamie be different if they were religious? How would their children differ?

12. How are the members of the Santerre family affected by the various outsiders -- Saffron, Martin, Fauchet, Katya -- who pass in and out of their lives? What qualities do these supporting characters have that the Santerres lack?

13. How does the novel's unusual structure -- alternating chapters told from many different points of view -- strengthen the story? Why is it so important for this particular novel that we read almost every character's point of view?

If you've read both Liars and Saints and A Family Daughter:
1A Family Daughter presents a different version of the Santerre family's history. How do these two versions differ? What are the differences between the Liars and Saints version of the truth and the A Family Daughter version of the truth (i.e., the identity of Jamie's mother; the details of Margot's family life; the deaths of Abby, Henry, Yvette, Teddy)? What reasons do you think the author had for presenting two different versions of this core story?

2. Are some of the characters' personalities different from book to book? If so, why do you think that is? Are their personalities different because the events in their lives are different, or are the events in their lives different because their personalities are different?

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 11 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2007

    So dysfunctional, it's relatable

    Although several subjects in 'A Family Daughter' are family issues that I cannot personally relate, I was completely entralled into the story of Abby. However, I could relate so easily to the family secrets and changes that occur over the years and how situations affect people so dearly.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2006

    Started off strong

    This book was a good book, though it started off awesome. It was fast and got to the point and went through things quick. Then about half way through things started slowing down and I couldn't help but wonder where the heck it was going. it got quite boring for a while then picked itself back up and ended decent.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2006

    Couldn't get through it

    I was very interested in reading this book, and was extremely disappointed. I thought she introduced charcters rather randomly as the story went along, that she jumped years too quickly, and, well, I don't want to give it away for those of you who will read this book, but I was all set with the storyline between Jamie and Abby. I read about half the book, then moved on to something else.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2006

    loved it!

    this was a great book! i loved all of the characters and loved how it progressed quickly and gave the characters their own chapters. I couldn't put it down!

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    Posted November 23, 2010

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    Posted January 27, 2010

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Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews

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