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Family Interventions in Domestic Violence: A Handbook of Gender-Inclusive Theory and Treatment

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Overview

In this exciting new book John Hamel, author of the ground-breaking Gender-Inclusive Treatment of Intimate Partner Abuse, and Tonia Nicholls go beyond the traditional intervention theories of domestic violence practiced today.

Offering alternative, unbiased and sometimes controversial views, theories, and current research, they, along with renowned contributors in the field, provide new treatment options that encompass a wide range of gender dynamics. Here are just some of the key principles covered:



• Interventions Should Be Based on a Thorough Unbiased Assessment
• Victim/Perpetrator Distinctions are Overstated, and Much Partner Abuse is Mutual
• Regardless of Perpetrator Gender, Child Witnesses to Partner Abuse are Adversely Affected, and are at Risk for Perpetrating Partner Abuse as Adults

This new gender-inclusive approach to assessment and intervention provides a significant departure from traditional paradigms of domestic violence, and offers a much-needed awareness to effectively prevent violence in our communities today and for future generations.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Gary B Kaniuk, Psy.D.(Cermak Health Services)
Description: This book discusses research, theory, assessment, and interventions regarding domestic violence, focusing on gender-inclusive issues, i.e., both men and women perpetrate abuse and that a more individualized treatment style should be considered for the perpetrator and family.
Purpose: The editors state, "The voices in this book join together in a swelling chorus, advocating for a widening scope of research and the implementation of alternative intervention policies. Clearly and unequivocally, these scholars and practitioners assert that finding effective ways to reduce domestic violence in our communities is more important than adhering to what is politically correct.
Audience: The book is intended "for anyone who works with victims or perpetrators of intimate partner abuse, whether primarily court-referred cases or self-referred clients in private practice or agency settings," according to the editors. "It also will be relevant to researchers and policymakers interested in evidence-based practice. Its gender-inclusive approach to assessment and intervention represents a significant departure from traditional paradigms, and the combination of theory, research, and policy and practice should serve to cross these essential pillars." Graduate students in clinical and counseling psychology programs would gain much from this book. John Hamel is a court-certified batterer intervention provider (since 1992) in San Francisco and has written about partner violence, including a recent book, Gender-Inclusive Treatment of Intimate Partner Abuse: A Comprehensive Approach (Springer Publishing Company, 2005). Dr. Nicholls is Senior Research Fellow at the BC Mental Health and Addictions Service in Canada and has published in this field.
Features: The book is divided into two main parts, one covering research and theory and the other on assessment and treatment. This is a substantial work dealing with a well-known clinical area, but using a gender-inclusive approach. The editors believe this new approach is needed because offenders appear to have less psychopathology and less extensive histories of abuse, and batterer intervention programs, especially those built upon feminist theory, have not been successful in reducing recidivism. This book is easy to read and extremely useful and enlightening. Chapter 2, "Thinking Outside the Box: Gender and Court-Mandated Therapy" made me think about what I thought I knew about partner abuse. The author points out the problems of the "Duluth" model, citing treatment outcome data and other research. Figures and tables are helpful in elucidating the concepts and many of the chapters in part 2 have instructive case examples.
Assessment: This is fairly exhaustive, with 28 chapters and 642 pages of informative research, assessment, and intervention strategies. The gender-inclusive approach makes it fairly unique and the editors and authors are willing to go against traditional and widely accepted ideas in the domestic violence field because research findings show that they are not effective in reducing recidivism. A new approach is needed and this book provides the reader with alternative possibilities to deal with a difficult problem that affects many families. If you work in this field (or hope some day to do so), this should be on your library shelf.
From The Critics
Reviewer: Gary B Kaniuk, Psy.D.(Cermak Health Services)
Description: This book discusses research, theory, assessment, and interventions regarding domestic violence, focusing on gender-inclusive issues, i.e., both men and women perpetrate abuse and that a more individualized treatment style should be considered for the perpetrator and family.
Purpose: The editors state, "The voices in this book join together in a swelling chorus, advocating for a widening scope of research and the implementation of alternative intervention policies. Clearly and unequivocally, these scholars and practitioners assert that finding effective ways to reduce domestic violence in our communities is more important than adhering to what is politically correct.
Audience: The book is intended "for anyone who works with victims or perpetrators of intimate partner abuse, whether primarily court-referred cases or self-referred clients in private practice or agency settings," according to the editors. "It also will be relevant to researchers and policymakers interested in evidence-based practice. Its gender-inclusive approach to assessment and intervention represents a significant departure from traditional paradigms, and the combination of theory, research, and policy and practice should serve to cross these essential pillars." Graduate students in clinical and counseling psychology programs would gain much from this book. John Hamel is a court-certified batterer intervention provider (since 1992) in San Francisco and has written about partner violence, including a recent book, Gender-Inclusive Treatment of Intimate Partner Abuse: A Comprehensive Approach (Springer Publishing Company, 2005). Dr. Nicholls is Senior Research Fellow at the BC Mental Health and Addictions Service in Canada and has published in this field.
Features: The book is divided into two main parts, one covering research and theory and the other on assessment and treatment. This is a substantial work dealing with a well-known clinical area, but using a gender-inclusive approach. The editors believe this new approach is needed because offenders appear to have less psychopathology and less extensive histories of abuse, and batterer intervention programs, especially those built upon feminist theory, have not been successful in reducing recidivism. This book is easy to read and extremely useful and enlightening. Chapter 2, "Thinking Outside the Box: Gender and Court-Mandated Therapy" made me think about what I thought I knew about partner abuse. The author points out the problems of the "Duluth" model, citing treatment outcome data and other research. Figures and tables are helpful in elucidating the concepts and many of the chapters in part 2 have instructive case examples.
Assessment: This is fairly exhaustive, with 28 chapters and 642 pages of informative research, assessment, and intervention strategies. The gender-inclusive approach makes it fairly unique and the editors and authors are willing to go against traditional and widely accepted ideas in the domestic violence field because research findings show that they are not effective in reducing recidivism. A new approach is needed and this book provides the reader with alternative possibilities to deal with a difficult problem that affects many families. If you work in this field (or hope some day to do so), this should be on your library shelf.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780826102454
  • Publisher: Springer Publishing Company, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 9/1/2006
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 696
  • Sales rank: 1,320,008
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

John Hamel, LCSW, a graduate of the University of California, Los Angeles, has been a court-certified Batterer Intervention Provider since 1992, headquartered in the Greater San Francisco Bay Area. His clinical services included family violence assessments and treatment programs for abusive men, women, and families. Mr. Hamel has provided consultation and training to mental health professionals, batterer intervention providers, victim advocates, attorneys and law enforcement, and has served as an expert court witness in criminal and family law courts. His articles on partner violence have appeared in the Family Violence & Sexual Assault Bulletin and the International Journal of Men's Health. Mr. Hamel is also the author of Gender-Inclusive Treatment of Intimate Partner Abuse: A Comprehensive Approach (Springer Publishing, 2005). His website is www.JohnHamel.net

Tonia L. Nicholls, PhD, is currently Senior Research Fellow, Forensic Psychiatric Services Commission, BC Mental Health and Addictions Services and Adjunct Professor of Psychology, Simon Fraser University. Her scholarly work has earned her "Brain Star" awards from the Institute of Neurosciences, Mental Health, and Addictions, Canadian Institutes of Health Research; the Canadian Psychological Association President's New Researcher Award; and the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Professional Contribution by a Graduate Student.

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chapter
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Table of Contents

Foreword, Linda G. Mills, New York University

Acknowledgments

Introduction, John Hamel and Tonia Nicholls

Part One: Research and Theory
• Domestic Violence: A Gender-Inclusive Conception, John Hamel
• Thinking Outside the Box: Gender and Court-Mandated Therapy, Donald Dutton
• Risk Factors for Physical Violence between Dating Partners: Implications for Gender-Inclusive Prevention and Treatment of Family Violence, Rose A. Medeiros and Murray A. Straus
• Power and Control in Relationship Aggression, Nicola Graham-Kevan
• Intimate Stalking and Partner Violence, Stacey L. Williams, Irene Hanson Frieze, H. Colleen Sinclair
• Couple Violence: A New Look at Some Old Fallacies, Patricia Noller, Laurance Robillard
• Domestic Violence Typologies, Nicola Graham-Kevan
• The Impact of Domestic Violence on Children's Development, Patrick T. Davies, Melissa L. Sturge-Apple
• Family Lessons in Attachment and Aggression: The Impact of Interparental Violence on
Adolescent Adjustment, Marlene M. Moretti, Stephanie Penney, Ingrid Obsuth, & Candice Odgers
• The Evolution of Battering Interventions: From the Dark Ages into the Scientific Age, Julia C. Babcock, Brittany Canady, Katherine Graham, Leslie Schart

Part Two: Assessment and Treatment
• Gender-Inclusive Family Interventions in Domestic Violence: An Overview, John Hamel
• Violence Risk Assessments with Perpetrators of Intimate Partner Abuse, Tonia Nicholls, Sarah L. Desmarais, Kevin S. Douglas, P. Randall Kropp
• Male Victims of Domestic Violence, David L. Fontes
• Domestic Violence in Ethno-Cultural Minority Groups, Kathleen Malley-Morrison, Denise A. Hines, Doe West, Jesse J. Tauriac, Mizuho Arai
• Systems Considerations in Working with Court-Ordered Domestic Violence Offenders, Lonnie Hazlewood
• Treatment of Psychological and Physical Aggression in a Couple Context, K. Daniel O'Leary and Shiri Cohen
• Couple Violence and Couple Safety: A Systemic and Attachment-Oriented Approach to Working with Complexity and Uncertainty, Arlene Vetere and Jan Cooper
• Dangerous Dances: Treating Domestic Violence in Same-Sex Couples, Vallerie E. Coleman
• Treatment of Family Violence: A Systemic Perspective, Michael Thomas
• Anger, Aggression, Domestic Violence, and Substance Abuse, Ronald T. Potter-Effron
• Therapy with Clients Accused of Domestic Violence in Disputed Child Custody Cases, Michael Carolla
• Family Therapy and Interpersonal Violence: Targeting At-Risk Adolescent Mothers, Jennifer Langhinrichsen-Rohling, Lisa A. Turner, Marilyn McGowan
• Family Group Therapy: A Domestic Violence Program for Youth and Parents, Nancy Carole Rybski
• Family Violence Parent Groups, Darlene Pratt and Tom Chapman
• Healing Child Victims and their Parents in the Aftermath of Family Violence, Christina M. Dalpiaz
• Gender-Inclusive Work with Victims and Their Children in a Co-ed Shelter, Carol Ensign and Patricia Jones
• Justice is in the Design: Creating a Restorative Justice Treatment Model for Domestic Violence, Peggy Grauwiler, Nicole Pezold, and Linda G. Mills
• Domestic Violence: New Visions, New Solutions, Cathy Young, Philip Cook, Sheila Smith, Jack Turteltaub, Lonnie Hazlewood

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2008

    A biased work and unhelpful

    Hamel's thesis is women 'provoke' much if not most of domestic violence. This is a dangerous and biased notion and not supported by valid statistical research. This is definitely the men's backlash movement against women.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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