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A Family of Value
     

A Family of Value

by John Rosemond
 

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John Rosemond's A Family of Value presents a critical view of the child care literature of the past quarter century and argues for an end to overindulgent parenting and a return to the goal of instilling moral values, such as responsibility, respectfulness, and resourcefulness.

Overview

John Rosemond's A Family of Value presents a critical view of the child care literature of the past quarter century and argues for an end to overindulgent parenting and a return to the goal of instilling moral values, such as responsibility, respectfulness, and resourcefulness.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Rosemond, who rails against dangerous, pervasive liberal parenting values and has, according to his publisher, 400,000 copies of his books in print, writes columns for mainstream magazines and newspapers and hosts a daily radio talk show. With such a following, he can hardly be the ``heretic'' he calls himself. Nor is there much revelatory material in his sixth book (after To Spank or Not to Spank), which promotes his beliefs that children want limits, must be taught that they are not the center of the universe and need to learn resourcefulness and responsibility. Rosemond dresses up this conventional wisdom in conservative rhetoric: blaming parental weakness or ambivalence on ``ultraliberal social propaganda'' (such as the anti-spanking movement), praising Rush Limbaugh and Phyllis Schlafly while vilifying Hillary Clinton and the National Education Association, and waxing rhapsodic about the good old days when no one considered blessing homosexual unions and when busy mothers were able calmly to tell their children, ``Leave me alone.'' Rosemond seems not to understand that today's parents struggle with their authority because they are without a paradigm to replace the often despotic practices of their parents. There's plenty of wisdom here, but it's delivered in a self-congratulatory, often patronizing tone. (Dec.)
Kathryn Carpenter
Confidently proclaiming himself a heretic opposed to democratizing the child-parent relationship, Rosemond presents his sixth parenting guide as a celebration of the American family of the 1950s and his contribution to a return to the commonsense values that characterized child rearing at that time. The middle section of the book, in which Rosemond advises on raising respectful, responsible, and resourceful children, gains its authority through encouraging parental self-confidence, common sense, and self-control. The initial section, however, with its frankly conservative analysis of social decline, school failure, and misguided parenting advice from experts, is not nearly as useful because it is both general in scope and inflammatory in tone. The final section provides specific answers to the most frequently asked questions. Rosemond is a frequent lecturer whose fans will enjoy his latest salvo, and even those who disagree with his philosophy will find this resource of his practical techniques for child rearing useful.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781449419363
Publisher:
Andrews McMeel Publishing
Publication date:
12/18/2012
Series:
John Rosemond , #6
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
759,891
File size:
933 KB

Meet the Author

John Rosemond is a family psychologist who has directed mental-health programs and been in full-time private practice working with families and children. Since 1990, he has devoted his time to speaking and writing. Rosemond’s weekly syndicated parenting column now appears in some 250 newspapers, and he has written 15 best-selling books on parenting and the family. He is one of the busiest and most popular speakers in the field, giving more than 200 talks a year to parent and professional groups nationwide. He and his wife of 39 years, Willie, have two grown children and six well-behaved grandchildren. 

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