Family Stress Management / Edition 2

Family Stress Management / Edition 2

by Pauline E. Boss
     
 

Reaffirming her commitment in the 1988 first edition to understanding the larger context surrounding families and the smaller context of families, which includes perceptions and meanings, Boss (marriage and family therapy, U. of Minnesota) here also emphasizes the need for a general family stress theory that can be applied to a wider diversity of people and families… See more details below

Overview

Reaffirming her commitment in the 1988 first edition to understanding the larger context surrounding families and the smaller context of families, which includes perceptions and meanings, Boss (marriage and family therapy, U. of Minnesota) here also emphasizes the need for a general family stress theory that can be applied to a wider diversity of people and families as well as to a greater variety of stresses and crises. She writes for other professionals who work with families.

Annotation © Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780803973909
Publisher:
SAGE Publications
Publication date:
11/01/2001
Edition description:
Second Edition
Pages:
232
Sales rank:
581,642
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.49(d)

Meet the Author

Pauline Boss, Ph.D., is Professor Emeritus at the University of Minnesota, a Fellow in the American Psychological Association and American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy; a former president of the National Council on Family Relations, and a family therapist in private practice. Dr. Boss received her Ph.D. in Child Development and Family Studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she subsequently taught for many years. In 1981, she joined the Department of Family Social Science at the University of Minnesota, where she was Professor and Clinical Supervisor in the doctoral training program in marriage and family therapy. She was appointed Visiting Professor of Psychology at Harvard Medical School, 1995-96.

With her groundbreaking work as a scientist-practitioner, Dr. Boss is the principal theorist in the study of ambiguous loss, a term she coined in the 1970s. Since then, she has researched various types of ambiguous loss, summarizing her work in the widely acclaimed book, Ambiguous Loss: Learning to Live with Unresolved Grief (Harvard University Press, 1999). In addition, Loss, Trauma, and Resilience (Norton, 2006), presents six therapeutic guidelines for treatment when loss is complicated by ambiguity. These guidelines are based on her years of work with families of the physically missing during the Vietnam War, after 9/11, and in Kosovo, as well as in clinical work with families with loved ones who are missing psychologically from Alzheimer's disease and other dementia, as well as from traumatic brain injury. Dr. Boss's most recent book, Loving Someone Who Has Dementia (Jossey-Bass, 2011) outlines proven strategies for managing the ongoing stress and grief while caring for someone who has dementia and offers hope for dealing with the ambiguous loss of dementia--having a loved one both here and not here, physically present but psychologically absent.

Read More

Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgments
1What Is New?1
What Is New in Family Stress Theory?2
2The Contextual Model: Understanding Family Stress in Science and Practice15
Family Stress Versus Individual Stress: A Conceptual Dilemma16
Family Stress Defined16
Defining the Family: A Matter of Bias18
General Systems Theory: The Family as System21
Symbolic Interaction as a Base for Studying Perceptions and Meanings22
Diversity and Multiculturalism in Family Stress Management25
Gender in Family Stress Management26
Why a Contextual Model?28
Looking Back30
The Theory-Building Process for Science and Practice35
3Definitions: A Guide to Family Stress Theory39
The Family's External Context40
The Family's Internal Context44
The ABC of Family Stress: A Frame for Definitions46
Stressor Event (Stressful Event) Defined47
Classification of Family Stressor Events50
The Primacy of Perceptions in the Contextual Model of Family Stress57
The Meaning to the Family of a Stressful Event or Situation59
Perceptions of Events Can Be Distorted60
Family Stress Defined61
Family Crisis Defined62
Family Strain (Burnout) Defined68
4Coping, Adapting, Being Resilient ... or Is It Managing?71
Coping in Individual Stress Theory73
Family and Individual Coping and Resiliency: The Need for a Dialectical View77
Family Coping Defined78
Deductive Evidence for the Social-Psychological Definition of Family Coping79
The Possibility of "Inherited" Coping Strategies81
A Caution About Coping and Resiliency81
Complexities of Coping85
The Chain Reaction of Stressor Events87
Family Coping Resources88
Family Managing as Outcome89
5Boundary Ambiguity: A Risk Factor in Family Stress Management93
The Family's Internal Context93
Family Boundary Ambiguity94
Normative Boundary Ambiguity in Families Throughout the Life Cycle104
6The Link Between Ambiguity and Ambivalence in Family Stress Management113
Theoretical Roots114
Definitions and Differences Between Ambiguity and Ambivalence114
Linking Ambiguity and Ambivalence to Family Stress Management, Resilience, and Context119
7Denial: Barrier or Buffer in Family Stress Management?123
How Some Families Break Through Denial130
8Family Values and Belief Systems: Influences on Family Stress Management135
Why Values and Beliefs Are Important136
Values and Beliefs as They Affect "Blaming the Victim"138
Values and Beliefs About Gender: Are They Related to Family Stress Management?143
9The Family's External Context149
External Forces With Which Families Contend150
Societal Pressure on the Family156
10Family Crisis: Overcoming Trauma and Victimization159
Family Victimization as Crisis161
Self-Blame: Is It Helpful?163
Chronic Threat of Victimization From Outside the Family164
Chronic Victimization From Inside the Family165
Cultural Violence and Victimization166
The Theory of a Just World168
Flaws in the Just World Theory169
Empowering Victimized Families171
11Where Have We Been and Where Are We Going?175
Where Have We Been?175
Where Are We Going? Recommendations for Future Research and Practice176
What Is Still Needed?182
The Dilemma Remains: Do We Focus on the Individual or the Family?184
Final Thoughts184
Postscript187
References189
Index207
About the Author217

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >