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Family Ties

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Overview

Annie Ferguson was a bright young Manhattan architect. Talented, beautiful, just starting out with her first job, new apartment and boyfriend, she had the world in the palm of her hand—until a single phone call altered the course of her life forever. Overnight, she became the mother to her sister’s three orphaned children, keeping a promise she never regretted making, even if it meant putting her own life indefinitely on hold.

Now, at forty-two, as independent as ever, with a ...

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Family Ties: A Novel

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Overview

Annie Ferguson was a bright young Manhattan architect. Talented, beautiful, just starting out with her first job, new apartment and boyfriend, she had the world in the palm of her hand—until a single phone call altered the course of her life forever. Overnight, she became the mother to her sister’s three orphaned children, keeping a promise she never regretted making, even if it meant putting her own life indefinitely on hold.

Now, at forty-two, as independent as ever, with a satisfying career and a family that means everything to her, Annie is comfortable being single and staying that way. She appears to have no time for anything else. With her nephew and nieces now young adults and confronting major challenges of their own, Annie is navigating a parent’s difficult passage between lending them a hand and letting go, and suddenly facing an empty nest. The eldest, twenty-eight-year-old Liz, an overworked, struggling editor in a high-powered job at Vogue, has never allowed any man to come close enough to hurt her. Ted, at twenty-four a serious and hardworking law student, is captivated by a much older, much more experienced woman with children, who is leading him much further than he wants to go. And the youngest, twenty-one-year-old Katie—impulsive, artistic, rebellious—is an art student about to make a choice that will lead her to an entirely different world she is in no way prepared for but determined to embrace.

Then, just when least expected, a chance encounter changes Annie’s life yet again in the most unexpected direction of all. 

From Manhattan to Paris and all the way to Tehran, Family Ties is a novel that reminds us how challenging and unpredictable life can be, and that the powerful bonds of family are the strongest of all. 
 

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Time and time again Danielle Steel has produced some of the most down to earth fiction out there and her latest, Family Ties is no exception. Bottom line: this novel is one of her best. Meet Annie Ferguson, am architect who becomes the guardian to her sister's three children after her sister is killed. We are then brilliantly given a flash-forward look at their lives over the next decade. Would you take a family member's or a best friend's children after a horrific accident claimed their lives? Would you sacrifice your dreams and career to raise kids you never expected to have?? How much do you truly love the people you say you love most in the world? Danielle Steel gives us one woman's answer and her unexpected journey of what it means to be a mother and the ties that bind families together: in good and in bad. ?Donald Kendall, ASM, #2923, Troy MI
Kirkus Reviews
An aunt steps up to mother her orphaned nieces and nephew, in Steel's predictable latest (A Good Woman, 2008, etc.). Annie, 26, is on the verge of embarking on an exciting career, and marrying well, when her sister Jane and her husband are killed in a plane crash. With some trepidation, Annie becomes guardian of Jane's three young children, Liz, Ted and Katie. Annie's fiance, not up to the challenge of a ready-made family, bows out. Cut to 16 years later. Annie has never married-she hasn't had time, thanks to her thriving architecture firm, which caters to New York City's wealthiest, and the challenges of raising her nieces and nephew. Her efforts have borne fruit: Ted is now in law school, Katie attends Pratt and Liz is a globetrotting jewelry editor for Vogue. After Ted's Contracts professor, Pattie, a divorcee 12 years his senior, seduces him, he's sexually in her thrall but knows it's not love. An ankle sprained at a job site sends Annie to the ER, where (during the interminable wait) she meets high-profile TV-news anchor Tom. After years of bland blind dates, Tom is a refreshing change. The plot duly thickens: Katie drops out of design school to work in a tattoo parlor, and she's besotted with her new boyfriend Paul, an Iranian/American dual national. Liz's scruffy French lover Jean-Louis seems to be too friendly with his ex-mistress Francoise, who's the mother of his child. Pattie stabs Ted's hand with a steak knife when he tries to leave. Paul and Katie take an ill-advised trip to Tehran, and his relatives confiscate their U.S. passports. Just when Tom and Annie are realizing (after an idyllic stay at a private villa in Turks and Caicos) there is room for each other in their fast-paced lives, it appears that her charges may now need her more than ever. A listless narrative not helped by Steel's plodding prose, but her legion of fans aren't in it for the surprise.
Publishers Weekly
Steele’s sprawling narrative concerns the efforts of 42-year old architect Annie Ferguson to juggle her career and budding romantic life with worry over the travails of her now grown nephew and nieces, whom she raised following the untimely death of her sister. For better or worse, the story line includes a wide array of soap opera elements, ranging from fashion photography in France to volatile issues of religious and family identity in Iran. Susan Ericksen demonstrates competence and attention to detail in bringing the dialogue to life. Yet in conjunction with the material, the listening experience--engaging as it may be at points--is overloaded with Hollywood caricatures, particularly in the cross-cultural experiences between the West and the Middle East. A Delacorte hardcover (Reviews, May 17). (July)
From the Publisher
“Steel is one of the best!”
Los Angeles Times
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780385343169
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 6/22/2010
  • Pages: 336
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Danielle Steel has been hailed as one of the world’s most popular authors, with over 590 million copies of her novels sold. Her many international bestsellers include Happy Birthday, 44 Charles Street, Legacy, Family Ties, Big Girl, Southern Lights, and other highly acclaimed novels. She is also the author of the story of her son Nick Traina’s life and death.

Biography

When it comes to commanding bestseller lists, no writer can come close to Danielle Steel. Her work has been published in 47 countries, in 28 languages. She has been listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the author who has spent the most consecutive weeks on The New York Times bestseller list. She has not only published novels, but has written non-fiction, a book of poetry, and two series of children's books. Many of her books have been adapted for television movies, one of which (Jewels) was nominated for two Golden Globe awards. She has received the title of Chevalier of the distinguished Order of Arts and Letters by the French Government for her immense body of work. In short, to say that Steel is the single most popular living writer in the world is no overstatement.

Steel published her first novel, Going Home, when she was a mere 26 years old, and the book introduced readers to many of the themes that would dominate her novels for the next 30-odd years. It is an exploration of human relationships told dramatically, a story of the past's thrall on the present. Anyone familiar with Steel's work will recognize these themes as being close to her heart, as are familial issues, which are at the root of her many mega-sellers.

Although Steel has a reputation among critics as being a writer of fluffy, escapist fare, she never shies away from taking on dark subject matter, having addressed illnesses, incest, suicide, divorce, death, the Holocaust, and war in her work. Of course, even when she is handling unsavory topics, she does so entertainingly and with refinement. Her stories may often cross over into the realm of melodrama, but she never fails to spin a compelling yarn told with a skilled ear for dialogue and character, while consistently showing how one can overcome the greatest of tragedies. Ever prolific, she usually produces several books per year, often juggling multiple projects at the same time.

With all of the time and effort Steel puts into her work (she claims to sometimes spend as much as 20 hours a day at her keyboard), it is amazing that she still has time for a personal life. However, as one might assume from her work, family is still incredibly important to her, and she maintains a fairly private personal life. Fortunately for her millions of fans, she continues to devote more than a small piece of that life to them.

Good To Know

Along with her famed adult novels, Steel has also written two series of books for kids with the purpose of helping them through difficult situations, such as dealing with a new stepfather and coping with the death of a grandparent.

When Steel isn't working on her latest bestseller or spending time with her beloved family, she is devoting her time to one of several philanthropic projects to benefit the mentally ill, the homeless, and abused children.

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    1. Hometown:
      San Francisco, California
    1. Date of Birth:
      August 14, 1947
    2. Place of Birth:
      New York, New York
    1. Education:
      Educated in France. Also attended Parsons School of Design, 1963, and New York University, 1963-67
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Matters of the Heart


By Danielle Steel

Random House Large Print

Copyright © 2009 Danielle Steel
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780739328422

Chapter One


Hope Dunne made her way through the silently falling snow on Prince Street in SoHo in New York. It was seven o'clock, the shops had just closed, and the usual bustle of commerce was shutting down for the night. She had lived there for two years and she liked it. It was the trendy part of New York, and she found it friendlier than living uptown. SoHo was full of young people, there was always something to see, someone to talk to, a bustle of activity whenever she left her loft, which was her refuge. There were bright lights in all the shops.

It was her least favorite time of year, December, the week before Christmas. As she had for the past several years, she ignored it, and waited for it to pass. For the past two Christmases, she had worked at a homeless shelter. The year before that she had been in India, where the holiday didn't matter. It had been a hard jolt coming back to the States after her time there. Everything seemed so commercial and superficial in comparison.

The time she had spent in India had changed her life, and probably saved it. She had left on the spur of the moment, and been gone for over six months. Reentry into American life had been incredibly hard. Everything she owned was in storage and she had moved from Boston to New York. It didn't really matter to herwhere she lived, she was a photographer and took her work with her. The photographs she had taken in India and Tibet were currently being shown in a prestigious gallery uptown. Some of her other work was in museums. People compared her work to that of Diane Arbus. She had a fascination with the destitute and devastated. The agony in the eyes of some of her subjects ripped out your soul, just as it had affected hers when she photographed them. Hope's work was greatly respected, but to look at her, nothing about her demeanor suggested that she was famous or important.

Hope had spent her entire life as an observer, a chronicler of the human condition. And in order to do that, she had always said, one had to be able to disappear, to become invisible, so as not to interfere with the mood of the subject. The studies she had done in India and Tibet for the magical time she was there had confirmed it. In many ways, Hope Dunne was an almost invisible person, in other ways, she was enormous, with an inner light and strength that seemed to fill a room.

She smiled at a woman passing by, as she walked through the snow on Prince Street. She was tempted to go for a long walk in the snow, and promised herself she might do that later that evening. She lived on no particular schedule, answered to no one. One of the blessings of her solitary life was that she was entirely at liberty to do whatever she wished. She was the consummate independent woman, she was enormously disciplined about her work, and in dealing with her subjects. Sometimes she got on the subway, and rode uptown to Harlem, wandering through the streets in T-shirt and jeans, taking photographs of children. She had spent time in South America, photographing children and old people there too. She went wherever the spirit moved her, and did very little commercial work now. She still did the occasional fashion shoot for Vogue if the layout was unusual. But most of the magazine work she did was portraits of important people who she thought were worthwhile and interesting. She had published a remarkable book of portraits, another of children, and was going to publish a book of her photographs from India soon.

She was fortunate to be able to do whatever she wanted. She could pick and choose among the many requests she got. Although she loved doing them, she only did formal portraits now once or twice a year. More often now, she concentrated on the photographs she took in the course of her travels or on the street.

Hope was a tiny woman with porcelain white skin, and jet-black hair. Her mother had teased her when she was a child and said she looked like Snow White, which in a way, she did. And there was a fairy-tale feeling about her too. She was almost elfin in size, and unusually lithe; she was able to fit herself into the smallest, most invisible spaces and go unnoticed. The only startling thing about her was her deep violet eyes. They were a deep, deep blue, with the slightly purple color of very fine sapphires from Burma or Ceylon, and were filled with compassion that had seen the sorrows of the world. Those who had seen eyes like hers before understood instantly that she was a woman who had suffered, but wore it well, with dignity and grace. Rather than dragging her down into depression, her pain had lifted her into a peaceful place. She was not a Buddhist, but shared philosophies with them, in that she didn't fight what happened to her, but instead drifted with it, allowing life to carry her from one experience to the next. It was that depth and wisdom that shone through her work. An acceptance of life as it really was, rather than trying to force it to be what one wanted, and it never could be. She was willing to let go of what she loved, which was the hardest task of all. And the more she lived and learned and studied, the humbler she was. A monk she had met in Tibet called her a holy woman, which in fact she was, although she had no particular affinity for any formal church. If she believed in anything, she believed in life, and embraced it with a gentle touch. She was a strong reed bending in the wind, beautiful and resilient.

It was snowing harder by the time she got to the front door of her building. She was carrying a camera case over her shoulder, and her keys and wallet were in it. She carried nothing else, and she wore no makeup, except very occasionally bright red lipstick when she went out, which made her look more than ever like Snow White. And she wore her almost blue-black hair pulled straight back, either in a ponytail, a braid, or a chignon, and when she loosened it, it hung to her waist. Her graceful movements made her look like a young girl, and she had almost no lines on her face. Her biography as a photographer said that she was forty-four years old, but it was difficult to assess her age and it would have been easy to believe she was far younger. Like the photographs she took, and her subjects, she was timeless. Looking at her, one wanted to stop and watch her for a long time. She rarely wore color, and dressed almost always in black, so as not to distract her subjects, or in white in hot climates.

Once she unlocked the front door to her building, she bounded up to the third floor with a quick step. She was cold, and happy to walk into her apartment, which was considerably warmer than it had been outdoors, although the ceilings were high and sometimes the wind crept through the tall windows.

She turned on the lights, and took pleasure, as she always did, in the spartan decor. The cement floor was painted black, the white couches and inviting chairs were a soft ivory wool, and nothing about the decor was intrusive. It was so simple it was almost Zen. And the walls were covered with enormous framed black and white photographs that were her favorites among her work. The longest wall was covered with a spectacular series of a young ballerina in motion. The girl in the photographs was exceptionally beautiful, a graceful young blond dancer in her teens. It was a remarkable series, and part of Hope's personal collection. On the other walls were many photographs of children, several of monks in India at the ashram where she had lived, and two enormous ones of heads of state.

Her loft was like a gallery of her work, and on one long white lacquer table, set on sponge-covered trays, all of her cameras were lined up in almost surgical order. She hired freelance assistants when she did assignments, but most of the time she preferred to do all her own work. She found assistants helpful, but too distracting. Her favorite camera was an old Leica she had had for years. She used a Hasselblad and Mamiya in the studio as well, but she still loved her oldest camera best. She had started taking photographs when she was nine. She had attended a specially designed photography program at Brown at seventeen, and graduated at twenty-one with honors, after doing a spectacular senior project in the Middle East. She had worked for a year as a commercial photographer after she graduated, and then retired for a dozen years, with only the occasional very rare assignment, when she married shortly after graduating from Brown. She had been back at work for the last ten years, and it was in the past decade that she had made her mark in the world and become increasingly well known. She had been famous by the time she was thirty-eight, when MOMA in New York showed an exhibit of her work. It had been one of the high points of her life.

Hope lit candles around the room and left the lights in the loft dim. Coming home to this room always soothed her. She slept on a little platform, up a ladder, on a spare narrow bed, and loved looking down at the room and the feeling of flying as she fell asleep. The loft was completely different from anywhere she had ever lived, and she loved that about it too. Because she had always feared it so much, this time she had embraced change. There was something powerful about accepting what frightened her most. Her private nemeses were loss and change, and rather than running from them, she had learned to face them with dignity and strength.

There was a small black granite kitchen at the back of the loft. She knew she had to eat, so eventually she wound up there, and heated up a can of soup. Most of the time, she was too lazy to make much of a meal. She lived on soups and salads and eggs. On the rare occasions when she wanted a real meal, she went to some simple restaurant alone and ate quickly, to get it over with. She had never been much of a cook, and made no pretense of it. It had always seemed like a waste of time to her, there were so many other things that interested her more—previously, her family, and now, her work. In the past three years, her work had become her life. She put her whole soul into it and it showed.

Hope was eating her soup, watching the snow fall outside, when her cell phone rang, and she set the soup down, and dug the phone out of her camera bag. She wasn't expecting any calls, and smiled when she heard the familiar voice of her agent, Mark Webber. She hadn't heard from him in a while.

"Okay, so where are you now? And what time zone are you in? Am I waking you up?" She laughed in response, and sat back against the couch with a smile. He had represented her for the last ten years, when she went back to work. He usually tried to push her to do commercial jobs, but he also had a deep respect for her more serious artistic endeavors. He always said that one day she would be one of the most important American photographers of her generation, and in many ways she already was, and was deeply respected by both curators and her peers.

"I'm in New York," she said, smiling. "And you're not waking me up."

"I'm disappointed. I figured you were in Nepal, or Vietnam, or someplace scary and disgusting. I'm surprised you're here." He knew how much she hated holidays, and all the reasons why. She had good reason. But she was a remarkable woman—a survivor—and a dear friend. He liked and admired her enormously.

"I figured I'd stick around for a while. I was sitting here watching the snow. It's pretty. I might go out and shoot for a bit later. Some nice old-fashioned stuff."

"It's freezing out," he warned her. "Don't catch cold." He was one of the few people who worried about her, and she was touched by his concern. She had moved around too much in recent years to stay in contact with her old friends. She had lived in Boston since college, but when she got back from India, she decided to move to New York. Hope had always been a solitary person, and was even more so now. It concerned him, but she seemed content with her life as it was.

"I just got in," she reassured him, "and I was having some chicken soup."

"My grandmother would approve," he said, smiling again. "So what do you have planned at the moment?" He knew she hadn't taken any assignments, since nothing had come through him.

"Nothing much. I was thinking about going up to the house in Cape Cod over the holiday. It's pretty there this time of year."

"How cheerful. Only you would think it's pretty. Everyone else would get suicidal there this time of year. I have a better idea." He had on his "have I got a deal for you" voice, and she laughed. She knew him well and liked him too.

"Like what? What crazy assignment are you going to try and talk me into now, Mark? Las Vegas on Christmas Eve?" They both laughed at the prospect of it. Occasionally he came up with some wild ideas, which she almost always turned down. But at least he had to try. He always promised the potential clients he would.

"No, although Vegas for the holidays sounds like fun to me." They both knew he loved to gamble and took occasional trips to Las Vegas and Atlantic City. "This is actually respectable and quite dignified. We got a call from a major publishing house today. Their star author wants a portrait sitting for his latest book cover. He hasn't delivered the book yet, but he will any minute, and the publisher needs the shot done now for their catalog and layouts for advance publicity in the trade. It's all very proper and on the up and up. The only problem is that they have a tight deadline. They should have thought of it before."

"How tight?" Hope asked, sounding noncommittal, and stretching out on the white wool couch as she listened.

"They need to do the shoot by next week, for their production schedule. That means you'd be shooting around Christmas, but he requested you, and said he won't do it with anyone else. At least the guy's got good taste. And the fee is pretty hefty. He's a big deal."

"Who's the author?" That would have an impact on her decision, and her agent hesitated before he said the name. He was an important author, had won the National Book Award, and was always at the top of the best-seller lists, but he was a bit of a wild card, and had appeared in the press frequently with assorted women. Mark didn't know how Hope would feel about shooting him, particularly if he misbehaved, and he could. There were no guarantees that he wouldn't. She usually preferred to work with serious subjects.

"Finn O'Neill," he said, without further comment, waiting to see what she'd say. He didn't want to influence her or discourage her. It was entirely up to her, and it would be perfectly reasonable if they declined since it was on short notice, and Christmas week.


From the Hardcover edition.

Continues...

Excerpted from Matters of the Heart by Danielle Steel Copyright © 2009 by Danielle Steel. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Average Rating 3.5
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 372 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2010

    What a waste of time

    I have not read a DS book in a long time but I think it is time for her to retire...all her books are too similar and on the boring, repetitive side. I decided to read this book because the story line sounded interesting but she kept repeating everything over and over again....seriously, how many times do we need to re-read the same thing??

    Very slow, very boring, very big waste of my time, got about 100 pages into the book and I had to dump it, it was just going no where with the characters or the story line.

    9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 29, 2010

    Disappointing

    I have been a fan of Danielle Steel for quite a while, but I found this book to be repetitive and predictable. The synopsis was more interesting than the book itself. Although there were some story lines that could have been intriguing, they weren't developed to their potential. Not one of this author's best works.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 13, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    intriguing family drama

    Twenty-six year old architect Annie Ferguson looks forward to starting on her new job and living in Manhattan with her boyfriend Seth. As she is euphoric and confident about the changes in her life, she thought nothing about her vow to be the guardian of her two nieces and nephew she made to her sister Jane. That is until Jane and her husband Bill die in a plane crash, so Annie raises the three preadolescent children (Liz, Ted and Katie). Seth cannot deal with the change so ends their relationship.

    Sixteen years later, Annie raised her wards with love while running a successful architectural firm. Ted attends law school, Katie is studying design at college; and Liz is a globetrotting Vogue editor. When Annie sprains her ankle, she goes to the emergency room where she meets TV news anchor Tom. Katie drops out of Pratt to work at a tattoo parlor while traveling to Teheran with her Iranian-American boyfriend Paul. Liz's French lover Jean-Louis seems back with his former lover Francoise, the mother of his child. Ted has a tryst with his older law professor, but when he tries to end their sexual relationship, Pattie stabs him in the hand.

    This intriguing family drama is an enjoyable contemporary as the aunt of the three orphaned children proves she is A Good Woman when she takes over raising them with the deaths of their parents. The tale contains way too much angst keeping the four subplots from gelling into a cohesive story line, but instead competes for the lead. Still fans will enjoy Danielle Steel's latest as the strong cast makes the case that family is the ultimate proof of chaos theory.

    Harriet Klausner

    5 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2010

    Very good book

    I enjoyed this book I coudn't put it down.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 26, 2010

    New Ideas??

    Danielle Steel has a good book going here, very heart felt with Annie taking over and raising her neices and nephew. I found the story line interesting but it showed a lot of redundency throughout the book. I would read a paragraph and the same content was brought about again a paragraph or two later!! Is Danielle Steel just trying to increase her number of words put into the book? I think all her books are becoming basically the same story-line. Woman meets man, falls in love and all ends happily. The plot is just different. I need some new direction from her to keep reading.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 4, 2012

    Couldn't even finish it

    I was hopping on a flight with nothing to read and ran across this novel. I generally check out reviews before getting books and wished I would have before I got this one. It's one of the worst I've ever attempted to read. It was so bad, I couldn't even finish it and I'm hoping I can get my money back. As was mentioned in previous reviews, there was a lot of repetitiveness to it and it seems as though it was written by a junior high student - at best. Most of the other reviews cover the poor quality of writing. Adding one more, 1-star review has to help bring down the overall rating. Don't know how anyone could give it a rating any higher.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 24, 2011

    Okay

    Not my favorite. Had to force myself to finish it. It was okay at best.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 24, 2011

    Skip it

    Some junior high journalism student is apparently now writing under Danielle Stelle's name. Incredibly redundant, not sure this even went through editing?! Skip this one.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2011

    Very disappointed.....

    I have been reading DS since I was in my 20's. I''m now 48 yrs old and I hate to say it, but she should retire. I used to read every one of her books the moment that they came out, but she is extremely repetitive and I can no longer get through one of her books. I feel like I'm reading the same sentence over and over. She words the idea differently once in a while, but it's saying the same thing! Sorry, but that's just my opinion. Don't rush to buy this, especially at this price.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2011

    DON'T WASTE YOUR MONEY!!!

    Danielle Steel just doesn't have it anymore. All her new books are so repetative and boring. I could barely make myself finsih this new disaster of a book. All the characters were so one-dimensional, you couldn't and didn't want to relate to any of them. I knew how all their storylines were going to end before they did! I think the worst one was Ted. When he finally found the way to end his crisis, I wanted to yell, "why didn't you do that in the first place, dummy?!"
    I have just bought a replacement copy of my favorite Steel book, "The Ring." I would recommend to all new readers of Danielle Steel to stick to her old historical novels, such as, "The Ring, "Rememberance", "Crossings", and "Thurston House". Also, if you really want to try one of hrr new books, check out a copy at the local library or buy it used. Unfortuneately, Ms. Steel seems to be only in it for the money now, as she is putting out 2 to 3 books a year that are repetative, boring, and actually insulting to the intelligence of the reader.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2010

    Disappointment - Skip this one.

    I was very intrigued with the summary on the inside cover but just do yourself a favor and skip this book - heck, skip this author. She doesn't delve into the characters very well, just writes about what they're doing and when, so it gets very boring. Half-way through the book and the main character is still the same. Blah! Danielle Steel should just enjoy her millions and let other people write books.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 19, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    GOOD BOOK

    I REALLY ENJOYED THIS BOOK AND IT PUT THINGS IN PERSPECTIVE FOR ME, IN SOME WAYS. PARENTS DO THINGS FOR THIER KIDS, BUT THIERS ALWAYS A TIME FOR EVERYONE TO MOVE ON. I THINK THAT SOMETIMES WE ALL WANT TO HANG ON TO THE PAST. I JUST REALLY ENJOYED THIS BOOK. I'TS A WINNER FOR ALL.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 17, 2010

    Ugh....so predictable

    I guess after writing so many books, even good authors run out of ideas. The plot was so predictable and there was such much redundancy(ie what a great mother figure Anne was and how great a job she did raising the kids). There were so many sections I skimmed through just to get to the end. Not a fan of this author anymore...the books are all the same!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 16, 2014

    Not A Fan

    This is only the second DS book that I've read.....and I won't be buying anymore. It read like a bad made for TV movie. The writing itself should have been much better, considering how many books this person has written. Added to that is the fact she kept repeating basic thoughts and actions of the characters to the point that I began wondering if she was prompting her readers (if so, she must think they are all idiots) or herself. Time to retire, DS.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2012

    Highly recomended

    I'm almosy through reading the bok Family Ties and it's a great book. Danielle Steel never fails to write a good book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2012

    Four stars

    Enjoyed kept me entertained and wanting to read.

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  • Posted July 1, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Awesome book but sad

    Very good!!! loved it to the end. Great family values.

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  • Posted June 8, 2012

    I am currently reading "Family Ties" by Danielle Steel

    I am currently reading "Family Ties" by Danielle Steel. I love the characters. They seem so real. The differences between the children are true to how families actually are. Annie is an amazing "mother". Danielle Steel has the magic touch that make's us (the readers) connect with the characters. Her novels are never boring, leaving me anxiously awaiting to read another one of her novels. I have been a fan of Ms. Steel for many years, she has provided me with many hours of entertainment. I give this book five stars and I I'm only on page 141. Thank you, Danielle for another great read.

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  • Posted May 13, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Quick, easy read that I enjoyed. I was really into the book and

    Quick, easy read that I enjoyed. I was really into the book and actually woke up at 4:30 this morning to finish it because I wanted to see how it ended! This wasn't my favorite Danielle Steel book, but one I'd definitely recommend. I like how I know that in her books there will be a happy ending, but it has to be worked up to with plenty of problems along the way. If you're looking for a fun summer read, pick this one up.

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  • Posted February 18, 2012

    SPANISH BOOKS PLEse

    sres. Barnes y Noble
    a mi me gustan mucho el tipo de novela con algo de misterio romance y accion
    es por eso que siempre pido si tienen version en espaÑol para el nook
    miS Fvoritos son nora roberts, jdrobb, rosamunde pilcher, danielle steele wilburn tambien he leido algo del hijo de pilcher-
    si uds tuvieran este tipo de libros en espsniol con mucho gusto los compraria espero respuesta qRAACIAS.
    ROSINA KLOT

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