×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Family Violence across the Lifespan: An Introduction
     

Family Violence across the Lifespan: An Introduction

by Ola W. Barnett, Cindy L. Miller-Perrin, Robin Dale Perrin
 

This comprehensive and accessibly written introduction provides state-of-the-art information on the aetiology, prevalence, treatment and prevention of family violence. Each chapter leads with a topic-specific interview that sets the stage for discussion on topics such as: child physical, sexual and emotional abuse; courtship violence and date rape; partner

Overview

This comprehensive and accessibly written introduction provides state-of-the-art information on the aetiology, prevalence, treatment and prevention of family violence. Each chapter leads with a topic-specific interview that sets the stage for discussion on topics such as: child physical, sexual and emotional abuse; courtship violence and date rape; partner abuse, battered women and batterers; and elder abuse.

The authors - leading authorities in the field - incorporate research findings from psychology, sociology, criminology and social welfare to provide a broad coverage of current viewpoints and debates. Their research discussions, while firmly based in science, are enlivened with passion, humour and informal interviews.

Editorial Reviews

3 Stars from Doody
Laura Kavesh
This 12-chapter book covers a broad range of topics -- several of them with a particularly contemporary spin -- related to family violence, including physical abuse, child sexual abuse, neglect, maltreatment, marital violence, courtship violence and date rape, battered women, and elder abuse. The authors seek to bring the national problem of family violence to mainstream, public knowledge and to summarize research findings for those already in the field. To make it easily accessible, each chapter highlights an interview with an expert in that particular area. The book is addressed to students with an interest in family violence as well as to current researchers in the field. The format and style of the book make it more appropriate for beginning students than advanced researchers. Tables; charts; photographs of interview subjects; mid-chapter summaries, which college students might appreciate; entertaining sidebar interviews with experts; and mini-articles on current events (e.g., the O.J. Simpson case) are featured. There are also ample references, indexes, and appendixes. This book would be an excellent way of introducing a beginning student in the field of family violence to aspects of this topic that are likely less widely studied or even acknowledged (e.g., elder abuse, date rape) and is therefore recommended as a beginning college text, especially given its easy-read, user-friendly format. It will be less useful as a scholarly work to those already in the field.
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Laura Kavesh, PhD (Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine)
Description: This 12-chapter book covers a broad range of topics — several of them with a particularly contemporary spin — related to family violence, including physical abuse, child sexual abuse, neglect, maltreatment, marital violence, courtship violence and date rape, battered women, and elder abuse.
Purpose: The authors seek to bring the national problem of family violence to mainstream, public knowledge and to summarize research findings for those already in the field. To make it easily accessible, each chapter highlights an interview with an expert in that particular area.
Audience: The book is addressed to students with an interest in family violence as well as to current researchers in the field. The format and style of the book make it more appropriate for beginning students than advanced researchers.
Features: Tables; charts; photographs of interview subjects; mid-chapter summaries, which college students might appreciate; entertaining sidebar interviews with experts; and mini-articles on current events (e.g., the O.J. Simpson case) are featured. There are also ample references, indexes, and appendixes.
Assessment: This book would be an excellent way of introducing a beginning student in the field of family violence to aspects of this topic that are likely less widely studied or even acknowledged (e.g., elder abuse, date rape) and is therefore recommended as a beginning college text, especially given its easy-read, user-friendly format. It will be less useful as a scholarly work to those already in the field.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780803956155
Publisher:
SAGE Publications
Publication date:
11/27/1996
Pages:
416
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x (d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Ola W. Barnett is a Distinguished Professor Emerita of Psychology at Pepperdine University, Malibu, California. She earned her undergraduate and doctoral degrees in Psychology at UCLA, specializing in Learning. Her initial research centered on batterers, and she later studied battered women and dating violence. She has coauthored two best-selling Sage books (with Alyce D. La Violette) on why battered women stay with abusive partners. These books provide a scientific explanation, grounded in learning theory, for understanding the obstacles battered women face in trying to break free. She remains active in the field of family violence by reviewing articles for a large number of journals and performing as an external grant reviewer for a few organizations. She serves on the editorial board of the new journal, Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice. She also continues research on the impact of transitional housing on the lives of battered women.

Robin D. Perrin is currently Professor of Sociology at Pepperdine University in Malibu, California. His research interests and publications are in the areas of interpersonal violence, deviance theory, the social construction of social problems, and the sociology of religion. He is the coauthor of three books: Social Deviance: Being, Behaving, and Branding (with D. Ward & T. Carter, 1991), Child Maltreatment: An Introduction (with C. Miller-Perrin, Sage, 1999; 2007), and Family Violence Across the Lifespan (with O. Barnett & C. Miller-Perrin, Sage, 1997, 2005; 2011). He is the author or coauthor of numerous articles on a variety of topics related to religion, deviance, and interpersonal violence. He is the recipient of the 2004 Howard A. White Award for Teaching Excellence. He received his doctorate in sociology from Washington State University in 1989. Following his doctoral studies he was Assistant Professor of Sociology at Seattle Pacific University in Seattle, Washington.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews