Famished

Famished

5.0 1
by Ivan Ewert
     
 
Hunger is wider than the world and more powerful than heaven.

What would man not do in service to its terrifying glory?

Famished: The Farm is a world of horrific appetites, not far removed from our own. Men and women go about their days half-aware of an empty dissatisfaction with their lives, their world-a void of empty consumption-and a gnawing sense that

Overview

Hunger is wider than the world and more powerful than heaven.

What would man not do in service to its terrifying glory?

Famished: The Farm is a world of horrific appetites, not far removed from our own. Men and women go about their days half-aware of an empty dissatisfaction with their lives, their world-a void of empty consumption-and a gnawing sense that there must be more.

Yet some few are aware.

They have stepped beyond the pale to see the truth of both their hunger and its inevitable fulfillment: Power. Satiety. Completion. Godhead. These are the gentleman ghouls of The Farm: the eaters of human flesh. The Farm follows Gordon Velander into the path of utter damnation and horrible redemption. His life will change forever. His sacrifice will change The Farm and all of the gentlemen ghouls in the world.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780985532321
Publisher:
Apocalypse Ink Productions
Publication date:
10/28/2012
Pages:
228
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.52(d)

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Famished 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
For those with a taste for horror, Ivan Ewert’s Famished: The Farm is a feast.  Through the person of its protagonist, Gordon Velander, and his battle with the villains of the piece—the Gentleman Ghouls—Famished: The Farm explores hunger as experienced in both the metaphorical and literal realms: the hunger for love and completion in the presence of a soul-mate and the hunger for the alimentary sustenance of survival.  In spare yet elegant prose, Ewert uses food as the refrain of his tale.  His description of a Christmas Eve dinner prepared by Velander’s girlfriend Sylvie is enough to send readers straight to GrubHub: “As she opened the oven, she took a deep breath, and her full lips widened in a satisfied smile. The warmth of the oven, the scent of rosemary and game and steam, played across her broad and beautiful features. She listened to the crackling music as layers of fat crisped along the bottom of the pan, the faintest whisper of a piece of loose flesh sliding free. The roast was so tender that it was falling off the bone without knife or fork, strips of flesh falling to soak itself in the delicious juices and sweet red wine below. The tension left her upper back and shoulders as the fruits of her labors began to work their magic.”  Since Famished: The Farm is a work of horror, not all meals will provoke such a response in readers, yet the strong narrative drive of Ewert’s writing will keep one hungering for more!