Fantastic Vampire

Overview

Wherever vampires existed in the imaginations of different peoples, they adapted themselves to the customs of the local culture. As a result, vampire lore is extremely diverse. So too, representations of the vampire in creative works have been marked by much originality. In The Vampyre (1819), John Polidori introduced Lord Ruthven and established the vampire craze of the 19th century that resulted in a flood of German vampire poetry, French vampire drama, and British vampire fiction. This tradition culminated in ...

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Overview

Wherever vampires existed in the imaginations of different peoples, they adapted themselves to the customs of the local culture. As a result, vampire lore is extremely diverse. So too, representations of the vampire in creative works have been marked by much originality. In The Vampyre (1819), John Polidori introduced Lord Ruthven and established the vampire craze of the 19th century that resulted in a flood of German vampire poetry, French vampire drama, and British vampire fiction. This tradition culminated in Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897), which fixed the character of the Transylvanian nobleman as the archetypal vampire firmly in the public imagination. Numerous films drew from Stoker's novel to varying degrees, with each emphasizing different elements of his vampire character. And more recent writers have created works in which vampirism is used to explore contemporary social concerns.

The contributors to this volume discuss representations of the vampire in fiction, folklore, film, and popular culture. The first section includes chapters on Stoker and his works, with attention to such figures as Oscar Wilde and Edvard Munch. The second section explores the vampire in film and popular culture from Bela Lugosi to Blacula. The volume then looks at such modern writers as Anne Rice and Chelsea Quinn Yarbro who have adapted the vampire legend to meet their artistic needs. A final section studies contemporary issues, such as vampirism as a metaphor for AIDS in Killing Zoe.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Vampires and vampire legends arose in central Asia in prehistoric times, and have radiated out to inhabit most of the known world, forever transforming and adapting themselves to the customs of the local culture and the dominant entertainment media. That transformation was the pivot of the conference. Six of the 16 essays consider Bram Stoker's masterpiece of the genre; the others look at the vampire in film and popular culture, modern vampire fictions, and contemporary issues in the world of the undead<-->colonialism, gender, and AIDS. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

Meet the Author

JAMES CRAIG HOLTE is Associate Professor of English at East Carolina University.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix
Introduction xi
Part 1 Studies in Stoker
1. Shapeshifting Dracula: The Abridged Edition of 1901 3
2. Bram Stoker and Irish Gothic 11
3. Dracula's Reflection: The Jewel of Seven Stars 23
4. "Appalling in Its Gloomy Fascination": Stoker's Dracula and Wilde's Salome 31
5. Stoker's Dracula: A Neo-Gothic Experiment 37
6. Men in Love: The Fantasizing of Bram Stoker and Edvard Munch 45
Part 2 The Vampire in Film and Popular Culture
7. Bela Lugosi's Dead, but Vampire Music Stalks the Airwaves 59
8. Policing Eddie Murphy: The Unstable Black Body in Vampire in Brooklyn 69
9. Resurrection in Britain: Christopher Lee and Hammer Draculas 77
10. I, Strahd: Narrative Voice and Variations on a Non-Player Character in TSR's "Ravenloft" Universe 89
Part 3 Modern Vampire Fictions
11. The Mother Goddess in H. Rider Haggard's She and Anne Rice's The Queen of the Damned 103
12. Blood Spirit/Blood Bodies: The Viral in the Vampire Chronicles of Anne Rice and Chelsea Quinn Yarbro 111
13. Kelene: The Face in the Mirror 123
14. The Construction of the Vampire in Yarbro's Hotel Transylvania 129
Part 4 Contemporary Issues in the World of the Undead
15. Deadly Kisses: Vampirism, Colonialism, and the Gendering of Horror 137
16. "A Girl Like That Will Give You AIDS!": Vampirism as AIDS Metaphor in Killing Zoe 145
Selected Bibliography 151
Index 155
About the Contributors 157
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