Far More Terrible For Women: Personal Accounts of Women in Slavery

Far More Terrible For Women: Personal Accounts of Women in Slavery

3.6 3
by Patrick Minges
     
 

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“De massa call me and tell me, ‘Woman, I’s pay big money for you, and I’s done dat 'cause I wants you to raise me chillum. I’s put you to live with Rufus for dat purpose. Now, if you doesn’t want whippin’ at de stake, you do what I wants.’ I thinks ‘bout Massa buyin’ me off de block and savin’

Overview

“De massa call me and tell me, ‘Woman, I’s pay big money for you, and I’s done dat 'cause I wants you to raise me chillum. I’s put you to live with Rufus for dat purpose. Now, if you doesn’t want whippin’ at de stake, you do what I wants.’ I thinks ‘bout Massa buyin’ me off de block and savin’ me from bein’ separated from my folks, and ‘bout bein’ whipped at de stake. Dere it am. What am I to do?”

So asks Rose Williams of Bell County, Texas, whose long-ago forced cohabitation remains as bitter at age 90 as when she was “just a ingnoramus chile” of 16. In all her years after freedom, she never had any desire to marry.

Firsthand accounts of female slaves are few. The best-known narratives of slavery are those of Frederick Douglass and other men. Even the photos most people have seen are of male slaves chained and beaten. What we know of the lives of female slaves comes mainly from the fiction of authors like Toni Morrison and movies like Gone With the Wind.

Far More Terrible for Women seeks to broaden the discussion by presenting 27 narratives of female ex-slaves. Editor Patrick Minges combed the WPA interviews of the 1930s for those of women, selecting a range of stories that give a taste of the unique challenges, complexities, and cruelties that were the lot of females uner the “peculiar institution.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780895875020
Publisher:
Blair, John F. Publisher
Publication date:
03/28/2013
Series:
Real Voices, Real History , #10
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
219
Sales rank:
726,383
File size:
1 MB

Meet the Author

Patrick Minges was born in the westernmost tip of North Carolina in the heart of the Blue Ridge Highlands where his family has lived for seven generations. Just up the hill from his birthplace in Murphy lies Fort Butler, an internment camp wherein began the Trail of Tears for many Cherokee. A little further away lies the Kituwah mound, the mythical birthplace of the Cherokee, and the holiest of all places for the Cherokee. Much of Patrick’s research and writing has been shaped by his origins.

After receiving his master’s degree in counseling from East Carolina, he spent several years teaching in the public schools of North Carolina and South Carolina. In 1986, he decided to pursue a different path and moved to New York City to attend divinity school where he eventually received a doctorate in American religious history. While attending divinity school, he began working in the human rights field first with Amnesty International and later with Human Rights Watch where he was the Director of Publications. After nearly fifteen years of working for human rights organizations, Patrick again decided to follow a different light and returned to the public schools where the struggles are not as grand but equally important. Presently, he is a teacher at Davidson Early College in Lexington, N.C. Patrick is also the editor of Black Indian Slave Narratives.

Patrick and his wife Penn Payler live and work on the grounds of Dan Nicholas Park in Salisbury, N.C., with their two dogs, Selu and Boon, and their two cats, Satori and Ashoka.

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Far More Terrible For Women: Personal Accounts of Women in Slavery 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is an excellent look into the lives of female slaves. However, the atrocious amount of typos is severely distracting and takes away from the enjoyment of reading. There is a significant typo in almost every sentence of this book, primarily consisting if capital A's and @ symbols randomly sprinkled throughout. Disappointing......
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very interesting read
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My mother grew up in the deep south, and had many of the predjudices against blacks that she raised us with. I just can't imagine the impunity with which children were separated from parents, and husbands separated from wives. Women forced to marry other men so breed children to increase slaves. I think what surprises me the most is that in looking back on it, these women appear to be reconciled to what their lives have become, injustices and all. I would recommend this book as a commentary on women and slavery study.