BN.com Gift Guide

Farmer Boy (Little House Series: Classic Stories #2)

( 31 )

Overview

While Laura Ingalls grows up on the western prairie, a boy named Almanzo Wilder is living on a farm in New York State. Here Almanzo and his brother and sisters help with the summer planting and fall harvest. In winter there is wood to be chopped and great slabs of ice to be cut from the river and stored. Time for fun comes when the jolly tin peddler visits, or best of all, when the country fair comes to town.

This is Laura Ingalls Wilder's beloved story of how her husband ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (2) from $94.51   
  • Used (2) from $94.51   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$94.51
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(1824)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

Acceptable
Reading copy. May have notes, underlining or highlighting. Dust jacket may be missing.

Ships from: Hillsboro, OR

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$94.82
Seller since 2006

Feedback rating:

(60911)

Condition: Good
Former Library book. Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers. Your purchase ... benefits world literacy! Read more Show Less

Ships from: Mishawaka, IN

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Sending request ...

Overview

While Laura Ingalls grows up on the western prairie, a boy named Almanzo Wilder is living on a farm in New York State. Here Almanzo and his brother and sisters help with the summer planting and fall harvest. In winter there is wood to be chopped and great slabs of ice to be cut from the river and stored. Time for fun comes when the jolly tin peddler visits, or best of all, when the country fair comes to town.

This is Laura Ingalls Wilder's beloved story of how her husband Almanzo grew up as a farmer boy far from the little house where Laura lived. The nine Little House books have been cherished by generations of readers as both a unique glimpse into America's frontier past and a heart-warming, unforgettable story.

Originally published in 1933, Farmer Boy is the second book in the Little House Series.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
If you picked up this book expecting to learn more about the pioneering adventures of the Ingalls family, you won't find it here. This story is about Almanzo Wilder, who as a young man will marry Laura Ingalls, but for now is a boy growing up on a large farm in New York. While his older brother, Royal, can't wait to move to the city and begin life as a shopkeeper or clerk, Almanzo loves the farm, and can't imagine any other life but farming. He especially loves the horses and desperately wants a colt of his own. But before he can have one he must prove he is ready for the responsibility. This book is rich in details about farm life in the late 1800s. Leather for boots, tallow for candles, fat for soap, and of course, meat for the dinner table, all come from the Wilders' slaughtered cattle. Not even the tiniest part is wasted. It puts our current throwaway society to shame. Wilder describes in great detail the process Almanzo uses in completing his chores, so readers can feel that they are making candles, growing a prize-winning pumpkin, or helping with the sheep shearing right along with him. Part of the "Little House" series, this book is not only enjoyable, but it would make a great addition to a classroom discussion of America's frontier past. 2003 (orig. 1933), Avon Books/Harper Collins Publishers,
— Pat Trattles <%ISBN%>0060522380
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781581180794
  • Publisher: LRS
  • Publication date: 10/28/2000
  • Series: Little House Series , #2
  • Format: Library Binding
  • Pages: 400
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Laura Ingalls Wilder was born in 1867 in the log cabin described in Little House in the Big Woods. She and her family traveled by covered wagon across the Midwest. Later, Laura and her husband, Almanzo Wilder, made their own covered-wagon trip with their daughter, Rose, to Mansfield, Missouri. There, believing in the importance of knowing where you began in order to appreciate how far you've come, Laura wrote about her childhood growing up on the American frontier. For millions of readers Laura lives on forever as the little pioneer girl in the beloved Little House books.

Garth Williams began his work on the pictures for the Little House books by meeting Laura Ingalls Wilder at her home in Missouri, and then he traveled to the sites of all the little houses. His charming art caused Laura to remark that she and her family "live again in these illustrations."

Biography

"I wanted the children now to understand more about the beginnings of things, to know what is behind the things they see -- what it is that made America as they know it," Laura Ingalls Wilder once said. Wilder was born in 1867, more than 60 years before she began writing her autobiographical fiction, and had witnessed the transformation of the American frontier from a barely populated patchwork of homestead lots to a bustling society of towns, trains and telephones.

Early pictures of Laura Ingalls show a young woman in a buttoned, stiff-collared dress, but there's nothing prim or quaint about the childhood she memorialized in her Little House books. Along with the expected privations of prairie life, the Ingalls family faced droughts, fires, blizzards, bears and grasshopper plagues. Although she didn't graduate from high school, Wilder had enough schooling to get a teaching license, and took her first teaching job at the age of 15.

Later, Wilder and her husband settled on a farm in the Missouri Ozarks, where Wilder began writing about farm life for newspapers and magazines. She didn't try her hand at books until 1930, when she started chronicling her childhood at the urging of her daughter Rose. Her first effort at an autobiography, Pioneer Girl, failed to find a publisher, but it spurred a second effort, a set of eight "historical novels," as Wilder called them, based on her own life.

Little House in the Big Woods (1932) was an instant hit. It was followed by a new volume every two years or so, and the series' success snowballed until thousands of fans were waiting eagerly for each new installment. "Ms. Wilder has caught the very essence of pioneer life, the satisfaction of hard work, the thrill of accomplishment, safety and comfort made possible through resourcefulness and exertion," said the New York Times review of Little House on the Prairie (1935).

In 1954, the American Library Association established the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award to honor the lifetime achievement of a children's author or illustrator; Wilder herself was the first recipient. After Wilder's death in 1957, historical societies sprang up to preserve what they could of her childhood homes, and her manuscripts and journals provided the material for several more books. A TV series based on the books, Little House on the Prairie, ran from 1974 to 1984 and renewed interest in Wilder's work and life. More recently, fictionalized biographies of her daughter, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother have appeared.

Wilder's books have now been translated into over 40 languages, and still provide an engrossing history lesson for young readers, as well as insight into the frontier values that Wilder once catalogued as "courage, self-reliance, independence, integrity and helpfulness" -- values, in her words, worth "as much today as they ever were to help us over the rough places."

Good To Know

Wilder's daughter, the writer Rose Wilder Lane, helped revise her mother's books; the collaboration was so extensive that one biographer proposed Rose was the "real" author of the Little House books. Most agree that Rose was, if not author or co-author, instrumental in suggesting the project to her mother and shaping it for publication.

After her books were published, fan mail for Wilder poured in; among more than a thousand cards and gifts she received for her birthday in 1951 was a cablegram of congratulations from General Douglas MacArthur.

Wilder, who had grown up making long journeys by covered wagon, took her first airplane ride at the age of 87, on a visit to Rose in Danbury, Connecticut.

Read More Show Less
    1. Also Known As:
      Mrs. A.J. Wilder
    1. Date of Birth:
      February 7, 1867
    2. Place of Birth:
      Pepin, Wisconsin
    1. Date of Death:
      February 10, 1957
    2. Place of Death:
      Mansfield, Missouri

Read an Excerpt

Farmer Boy


By Laura Ingalls Wilder

Rebound by Sagebrush

Copyright ©2003 Laura Ingalls Wilder
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0613714229

Chapter One

It was January in northern New York State, sixty-seven years ago. Snow lay deep everywhere. It loaded the bare limbs of oaks and maples and beeches, it bent the green boughs of cedars and spruces down into the drifts. Billows of snow covered the fields and the stone fences.

Down a long road through the woods a little boy trudged to school, with his big brother Royal and his two sisters, Eliza Jane and Alice. Royal was thirteen years old, Eliza Jane was twelve, and Alice was ten. Almanzo was the youngest of all, and this was his first going-to-school, because he was not quite nine years old.

He had to walk fast to keep up with the others, and he had to carry the dinner-pail.

"Royal ought to carry it," he said. "He's bigger than I be."

Royal strode ahead, big and manly in boots, and Eliza Jane said:

"No, 'Manzo. It's your turn to carry it now, because you're the littlest."

Eliza Jane was bossy. She always knew what was best to do, and she made Almanzo and Alice do it.

Almanzo hurried behind Royal, and Alice hurried behind Eliza Jane, in the deep paths made by bobsled runners. On each side the soft snow was piled high. The road went down a long slope, then it crossed a little bridge and went on for a mile through the frozen woods to the schoolhouse.

The cold nipped Almanzo's eyelids and numbed his nose, but inside his good woolen clothes he was warm. They were all made from the wool of his father's sheep. His underwear was creamy white, but Mother had dyed the wool for his outside clothes.

Butternut hulls had dyed the thread for his coat and his long trousers. Then Mother had woven it, and she had soaked and shrunk the cloth into heavy, thick fullcloth. Not wind nor cold nor even a drenching rain could go through the good fullcloth that Mother made.

For Almanzo's waist she had dyed fine wool as red as a cherry, and she had woven a soft, thin cloth. It was light and warm and beautifully red.

Almanzo's long brown pants buttoned to his red waist with a row of bright brass buttons, all around his middle. The waist's collar buttoned snugly up to his chin, and so did his long coat of brown fullcloth. Mother had made his cap of the same brown fullcloth, with cozy ear-flaps that tied under his chin. And his red mittens were on a string that went up the sleeves of his coat and across the back of his neck. That was so he couldn't lose them.

He wore one pair of socks pulled snug over the legs of his underdrawers, and another pair outside the legs of his long brown pants, and he wore moccasins. They were exactly like the moccasins that Indians wore.

Girls tied heavy veils over their faces when they went out in winter. But Almanzo was a boy, and his face was out in the frosty air. His cheeks were red as apples and his nose was redder than a cherry, and after he had walked a mile and a half he was glad to see the schoolhouse.

It stood lonely in the frozen woods, at the foot of Hardscrabble Hill. Smoke was rising from the chimney, and the teacher had shoveled a path through the snowdrifts to the door. Five big boys were scuffling in the deep snow by the path.

Almanzo was frightened when he saw them. Royal pretended not to be afraid, but he was. They were the big boys from Hardscrabble Settlement, and everybody was afraid of them.

They smashed little boys' sleds, for fun. They'd catch a little boy and swing him by his legs, then let him go headfirst into the deep snow.

Sometimes they made two little boys fight each other, though the little boys didn't want to fight and begged to be let off.

These big boys were sixteen or seventeen years old and they came to school only in the middle of the winter term. They came to thrash the teacher and break up the school. They boasted that no teacher could finish the winter term in that school, and no teacher ever had.

This year the teacher was a slim, pale young man. His name was Mr. Corse. He was gentle and patient, and never whipped little boys because they forgot how to spell a word. Almanzo felt sick inside when he thought how the big boys would beat Mr. Corse. Mr. Corse wasn't big enough to fight them.

There was a hush in the schoolhouse and you could hear the noise the big boys were making outside. The other pupils stood whispering together by the big stove in the middle of the room. Mr. Corse sat at his desk. One thin cheek rested on his slim hand and he was reading a book. He looked up and said pleasantly: "Good morning."

Royal and Eliza Jane and Alice answered him politely, but Almanzo did not say anything. He stood by the desk, looking at Mr. Corse. Mr. Corse smiled at him and said:

"Do you know I'm going home with you tonight?" Almanzo was too troubled to answer. "Yes," Mr. Corse said. "It's your father's turn."

Every family in the district boarded the teacher for two weeks. He went from farm to farm till he had stayed two weeks at each one. Then he closed school for that term.

When he said this, Mr. Corse rapped on his desk with his ruler; it was time for school to begin. All the boys and girls went to their seats. The girls sat on the left side of the room and boys sat on the right side, with the big stove and wood-box ...



Continues...


Excerpted from Farmer Boy by Laura Ingalls Wilder Copyright ©2003 by Laura Ingalls Wilder. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

School Days 1
Winter Evening 13
Winter Night 30
Surprise 39
Birthday 49
Filling the Ice-House 65
Saturday Night 75
Sunday 84
Breaking the Calves 95
The Turn of the Year 109
Springtime 120
Tin-Peddler 133
The Strange Dog 141
Sheep-Shearing 154
Cold Snap 163
Independence Day 173
Summer-Time 190
Keeping House 203
Early Harvest 228
Late Harvest 240
Read More Show Less

First Chapter

Farmer Boy
School Days


It was January in northern New York State, sixty-seven years ago. Snow lay deep everywhere. It loaded the bare limbs of oaks and maples and beeches, it bent the green boughs of cedars and spruces down into the drifts. Billows of snow covered the fields and the stone fences.

Down a long road through the woods a little boy trudged to school, with his big brother Royal and his two sisters, Eliza Jane and Alice. Royal was thirteen years old, Eliza Jane was twelve, and Alice was ten. Almanzo was the youngest of all, and this was his first going-to-school, because he was not quite nine years old.

He had to walk fast to keep up with the others, and he had to carry the dinner-pail.

"Royal ought to carry it," he said. "He's bigger than I be."

Royal strode ahead, big and manly in boots, and Eliza Jane said:

"No, 'Manzo. It's your turn to carry it now, because you're the littlest."

Eliza Jane was bossy. She always knew what was best to do, and she made Almanzo, and Alice do it.

Almanzo hurried behind Royal, and Alice hurried behind Eliza Jane, in the deep paths made by bobsled runners. On each side the soft snow was piled high. The road went down a long slope, then it crossed a little bridge and went on for a mile through the frozen woods to the schoolhouse.

The cold nipped Almanzo's eyelids and numbed his nose, but inside his good woolen clothes he was warm. They were all made from the wool of his father's sheep. His underwear was creamy white, but Mother had dyed the wool for his outside clothes.

Butternut hulls had dyed the thread for his coat and his long trousers. Then Mother had woven it, and she had soaked and shrunk the cloth into heavy, thick fullcloth. Not wind nor cold nor even a drenching rain could go through the good fullcloth that Mother made.

For Almanzo's waist she had dyed fine wool as red as a cherry, and she had woven a soft, thin cloth. It was light and warm and beautifully red.

Almanzo's long brown pants buttoned to his red waist with a row of bright brass buttons, all around his middle. The waist's collar buttoned snugly up to his chin, and so did his long coat of brown fullcloth. Mother had made his cap of the same brown fullcloth, with cozy ear-flaps that tied under his chin. And his red mittens were on a string that went up the sleeves of his coat and across the back of his neck. That was so he couldn't lose them.

He wore one pair of socks pulled snug over the legs of his underdrawers, and another pair outside the legs of his long brown pants, and he wore moccasins. They were exactly like the moccasins, that Indians wore.

Girls tied heavy veils over their faces when they went out in winter. But Almanzo was a boy, and his face was out in the frosty air. His cheeks were red as apples and his nose was redder than a cherry, and after he had walked a mile and a half he was glad to see the schoolhouse.

It stood lonely in the frozen woods, at the foot of Hardscrabble Hill. Smoke was rising from the chimney, and the teacher had shoveled a path through the snowdrifts to the door. Five big boys were scuffling in the deep snow by the path.

Almanzo was frightened when he saw them. Royal pretended not to be afraid, but he was. They were the big boys from Hardscrabble Settlement, and everybody was afraid of them.

They smashed little boys' sleds, for fun. They'd catch a little boy and swing him by his legs, then let him go headfirst into the deep snow.

Sometimes they made two little boys fight each other, though the little boys didn't want to fight and begged to be let off.

These big boys were sixteen or seventeen years old and they came to school only in the middle of the winter term. They came to thrash the teacher and break up the school. They boasted that no teacher could finish the winter term in that school, and no teacher ever had.

This year the teacher was a slim, pale young man. His name was Mr. Corse. He was gentle and patient, and never whipped little boys because they forgot how to spell a word. Almanzo felt sick inside when he thought how the big boys would beat Mr. Corse. Mr. Corse wasn't big enough to fight them.

There was a hush in the schoolhouse and you could hear the noise the big boys were making outside. The other pupils stood whispering together by the big stove in the middle of the room. Mr. Corse sat at his desk. One thin cheek rested on his slim hand and he was reading a book. He looked up and said pleasantly:

"Good morning."

Royal and Eliza Jane and Alice answered him politely, but Almanzo did not say anything. He stood by the desk, looking at Mr. Corse. Mr. Corse smiled at him and said:

"Do you know I'm going home with you tonight?" Almanzo was too troubled to answer. "Yes," Mr. Corse said. "It's your father's turn."

Every family in the district boarded the teacher for two weeks. He went from farm to farm till he had stayed two weeks at each one. Then he closed school for that term.

When he said this, Mr. Corse rapped on his desk with his ruler; it was time for school to begin. All the boys and girls went to their seats. The girls sat on the left side of the room and boys sat on the right side, with the big stove and wood-box in the middle between them. The big ones sat in the back, seats, the middle-sized ones in the middle seats, and the little ones in the front seats. All the seats were the same size. The big boys could hardly get their knees under their desks, and the little boys couldn't rest their feet on the floor.

Farmer Boy. Copyright © by Laura Wilder. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 31 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(23)

4 Star

(8)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 31 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 23, 2013

    Almanzo Wilder is a farmer, who wants to be just as hard a worke

    Almanzo Wilder is a farmer, who wants to be just as hard a worker as his father is. He helps his family by working with their crops of hay, selling the potatoes, hoeing carrots, planting corn &amp; pumpkins, and picking berries. He learns how to do everything else on the farm too, like dealing with the sheep &amp; pigs, to training the young oxen &amp; horses, to gathering the sap from the trees.

    Almanzo also does things that other children do, like going to school, or sledding on a winter day, and sometimes he gets in trouble, whether he's in it by himself or with his older brother &amp; sisters. There's usually something exciting going on, like the County Fair, or a holiday like Independence Day. When Mother &amp; Father leave for a few days, what do you think the children do in their absence?

    He's a hungry growing boy and it seems that the Wilder's table is always overflowing with good home-cooked food, so there's plenty, even for Almanzo's very large appetite.

    &quot;Farmer Boy&quot; is the third book in the &quot;Little House&quot; series, but since Almanzo's story isn't connected to the other stories in the series, you can read this book at any time, even if you haven't read any of the other books.

    A few years ago, my family read this book aloud, and I've read it again myself since then. I enjoy reading the &quot;Little House&quot; books, and this one is a definite favorite. I think anyone, boys or girls, would like reading this story.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 15, 2012

    Excellent read

    I bought this book to read with my 5 year old son who loves learning about what life was like in the past (especially during 'pioneer' times). We visited the Farmer's Museum in Cooperstown, NY this past summer and he relates much of what he saw there to Almanzo's life. He has very little difficulty reading this book, but prefers to hear me read it to him. Some parts have been very excting, and others are a little more harsh than I had originally wanted to discuss with him (the death of a past school teacher being beaten to death by an unruly group of students---don't worry this info does not spoil any part of the book ¿), but he is very mature for his five years and has been able to deal with it. We are loving this book so far....I would highly recommend this book to any child interested in learning about life in the late 1800's or agriculture/ growing up on a farm.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 2, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    A summer of great reading memories with my boys!

    I have 3 boys ages 8, 9 1/2 and 11 1/2 and last summer we read some of Farmer Boy. We would start our reading time with 3 boys but my youngest was not yet old enough to sit still and listen through a whole chapter and so not everyone heard all of the chapters. Without full participation, my commitment faltered and we ended up not finishing the book. This summer the boys asked if Farmer Boy could be our Summer Bedtime Book again, so I gave it another try. After they are in their PJs, they all bring their pillows, fuzzy blankets and bean bags into the living room and we usually make it through a couple of chapters in an evening. We often stop to talk about vocabulary words to make sure that everyone is learning new words as well as understanding the words in the context that they are used (like "gay" means "happy" in this book.) My boys love their Wii, TV and Nintendo DSs, however this book can keep their attention beautifully! What I love the most are the memories that I am making with my boys. So the other day I came up with the idea of buying them each their own copy of Farmer Boy (the copy that I have been reading out of is my yellowed, tattered paperback copy that was printed in 1971.) With each copy, I will write them each a note to help them remember our fun Farmer Boy reading time during the summer of 2010. I will place the 3 copies with their notes in my hope chest and give the books to them when they each become fathers. Though far from Super Mom, sometimes when I do nurturing or fun things with my boys I tell them, "Promise me that you will do this with your children some day." I do hope that they remember and continue with this great tradition of reading to their kids! Now go read to your kids, grandchildren or even your spouse, it really is a fun way to bond!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 8, 2010

    Farmer Boy

    Laura Ingalls Wilder's "Farmer Boy" is a wonderful story. A break in the Little House series, it tells the story of the boyhood of Mrs. Wilder's husband, Almanzo. It makes excellent reading for adults as well as children, and keeps alive the tradition, knowledge and lore of hands-on farming. Who today would think of saving potatoes from frost by pouring water on the plants before the sun can hit them? Who today grasps the notion that draft animals need to be trained with love and (unending) patience?

    But more than this, it's also the story of a boy being raised to understand his world and his place in it. Being raised in a time when children are meant to be seen and not heard, Almanzo nevertheless has ample opportunity to observe his elders, to ask questions, and even express his own opinion. The way his father teaches him the value of money is both striking and deep. It's especially significant today, when children do not work, and have little or no grasp on what money and the things it buys are worth.

    Furthermore, it is a snapshot of life in America at a time before living memory. Mrs. Wilder herself espoused the belief that in order to understand where one is going, he/she needs to understand where he/she came from. Anyone who wants to understand where America came from has to read "Farmer Boy." It is not about key events, significant dates or wars. Rather, it is about people; how they lived, how they worked, what they did for fun and what their values were. These are things are real history, and need to be both preserved and savored.

    Mrs. Wilder's books preserve them. Reading the books allows us to savor them, as well as learn from them.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 17, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    The title, Farmer Boy, says exactly what the book is about---life and times of a child growing up on a farm in the 1800's.

    I should have read this book as a child, but somehow I missed it. Farmer Boy is a must for all children and parents to read. The first time I read this was when I used to read to my young children before they went to sleep each night. Farmer Boy was a favorite with all of them and they learned many good lessons from it. Of my five children, two of them now have children old enough to read on their own. It doesn't surprise me that they are reading (along with the help of their parents) Farmer Boy and the other books in the wonderful series written by Laura Ingalls Wilder.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2009

    Still Appealing

    I bought this series for my grandaughter because I enjoyed it so much as a child. My daughter also enjoyed it and now her daughter does too.
    This is semi-biographical and historical, written in beautiful prose for all ages. In our busy materialistic society, it is good to be reminded
    of how these pioneers in early America had so little and lived honestly
    and could be appreciative and happy. The Wilder books are universally appealing.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2009

    Another Laura Ingalls Wilder favorite

    Good book. Nice to read the history of Manly.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2008

    Excellent story !!

    This story of Almanzo Wilder's boyhood was well written by Laura Ingalls Wilder.Not only did readers learn that the Wilders lived differentally than the Ingalls family there are many wonderful stories of Almanzo's boyhood days in this book for all to share,frorm raising a milk-fed pumpkin to his first colt named Star. I would recomend this book to everyone....young and old alike. I began reading these books at age 8 and I am 53 now.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2006

    Change of Pace

    Farmer Boy was a change of pace from the other Little House book series. The Wilder family did not want for anything. In contrast, the Ingalls family were poor and lived in tiny houses and seems to always wonder where their food was coming from one meal to the next. Apart from that, I actually enjoy the books of Laura's childhood better than Almanzo's. Even though the Ingalls were dirt poor there is a certain charm.....

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2006

    Outstanding

    This book gave me an idea of what Almanzo's life was before he moved out west. I loved it! Laura Ingalls is a very talented writer.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2004

    An interesting novel

    This book was an interesting and facinating novel. This novel has all the excitment and all the very distinguished words.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2003

    Laura Ingalls Wilder hits a 'homerun' again!

    One of many 'homeruns' hit by Laura Ingalls Wilder! Great Story!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2002

    Teacher's Choice

    The students in my 4th grade classroom love this book. It teaches values, work ethics,and is interesting for kids to read. Little House book have been a favorite of mine since I was in 4th grade.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2002

    Wonderful farmer boy review

    Farmer Boy is about the childhood of Almonzo Wilder. I really like this book. It's a great book. I recommend you or your children read this book and find out more about Almonzo Wilder.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2002

    Farmer Boy Rocks The Barn

    this book is so cool even for girls!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2001

    Farmer Boy

    i think this is the best Laura Inglles Wilder EVER wrote. it's become my favorite book i've read for years!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2000

    The best in the series!!

    when i was about 8, my mom got the whole series for me, i think about 8 books, from the time laura ingalls was a little girl up until she married almanzo wilder and their house burned down. this is the one book that i read over and over and over until the binding split!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 8, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 31 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)