Farmer Brown Shears His Sheep

Farmer Brown Shears His Sheep

5.0 4
by Teri Sloat, Nadine Bernard Westcott
     
 

"Farmer Brown was shearing sheep, piling up a snowy heap of wool that filled his shed, knee-deep..." But when the temperature drops, his shivering sheep see all their wool in sacks—and "BAAA!" they cry. "WE WANT IT BACK!" Young listeners will enjoy chiming in on this hilarious read-aloud as Farmer Brown's sheep track down their wool. As the farmer goes form one…  See more details below

Overview

"Farmer Brown was shearing sheep, piling up a snowy heap of wool that filled his shed, knee-deep..." But when the temperature drops, his shivering sheep see all their wool in sacks—and "BAAA!" they cry. "WE WANT IT BACK!" Young listeners will enjoy chiming in on this hilarious read-aloud as Farmer Brown's sheep track down their wool. As the farmer goes form one neighbor to the next, his sheep discover how their fleece changes when it's cleaned, carded, spun into yarn, and dyed. Can they get it back? It's the tender-hearted Farmer Brown himself who comes up with the surprise solution. "Now each year, come shearing time, the sheep wait eagerly in line, to feel the clip and hear the buzz, and wear bright sweaters over fuzz."

Author Biography: Teri Sloat is no stranger to sheep and other farm animals; she and her husband have raised many themselves. Ms. Sloat is the author and illustrator of several picture books, in addition to having written two previous books about Farmer Brown. She lives with her husband and youngest daughter in Sebastopol, California.

Nadine Bernard Westcott has also raised sheep and lived through the process of making yarn from fleece. Her funny pictures can be found in countless popular picture books, including those about Farmer Brown. She lives on the island of Nantucket in Massachusetts.

Read More

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Get ready for a story-hour tale that will tickle your funny bone and leave kids asking for more. Full of rhythmic rhyme, hilarious illustrations, and just plain fun, the story follows Farmer Brown through the wild and wooly process of making yarn from wool. There's only one problem. Sheared down to sheer fuzz, the sheep are left shivering. They want that wool baaaaack! They chase after Farmer Brown in shock as their wool is washed, combed, spun, and dyed beyond recognition. When one brave sheep shivering and shaking reaches through the window to get the yarn, Farmer Brown realizes the dilemma. He grabs the wool, his shivering sheep, and his knitting needles. In no time, he knits his chilly friends colorful wooly sweaters, which they wear proudly. Now, each time shearing season starts, the sheep are eagerly shaved. 2000, Dorling Kindersley Publishing, Ages 2 to 6, $15.95. Reviewer: Leslie Julian
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-Bouncy verse takes readers right into a common rural scene: "Farmer Brown was shearing sheep,/Piling up a snowy heap/Of wool that filled his shed, knee-deep." Meanwhile, the silly illustrations hint at a story that is anything but ordinary: unshorn sheep are huddled together in wide-eyed dread, while those who have been buzzed are shivering. The cold creatures want their wool back and follow Farmer Brown as he takes it from place to place to have it washed, combed, carded, spun, and dyed until he finally takes pity on them and "Knit-purl, knit-purl,/The farmer's fingers looped and twirled" and he creates colorful sweaters for each one. "Now each year, come shearing time,/The sheep wait eagerly in line/To feel the clip and hear the buzz,/And wear bright sweaters over fuzz." The consistently cheerful and unstrained rhyme spins a great yarn, and at the same time pleasantly conveys facts about wool processing. Westcott's characteristically humorous watercolor cartoons will evoke a few giggles as the bare sheep peek in windows, chase the farmer, get tangled in the yarn, and finally warm up in their cozy sweaters. Pair this lighthearted romp with this creative team's Farmer Brown Goes Round and Round (DK Ink, 1999) and The Thing That Bothered Farmer Brown (Orchard, 1995).-Lee Bock, Glenbrook Elementary School, Pulaski, WI Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
It's baaaaad news for the sheep when Farmer Brown (The Thing That Bothered Farmer Brown, 1995) brings out the shears. ("Clip-clip, buzz-buzz, / He took their wool and left them fuzz.") Oblivious to the shorn and shivering flock trotting along behind, Farmer Brown cheerfully hauls away bags of fleece to be washed, carded, spun, and dyed. ("From fleece to yarn, it stretched and changed— / �Baaa!' they cried. �Our wool looks strange!' ") Only when the sheep nerve themselves to snatch the skeins does Farmer Brown become aware of their plight and, proving himself as adept with knitting needles as with those shears, he fashions brightly colored cardigans for all. (Picture the shivering sheep standing on the porch, serving as spool for the threads of yarn.) Like several books, from Tomie dePaola's Charlie Needs a Cloak (1973) to Robyn Eversole's Red Berry Wool (1999), this will give readers at least a sense of how wool gets from sheep to sweater. But with Sloat's frisky rhymed text and Westcott's sunny watercolor cartoons, it's even more clearly a breezy lesson in compassion. (Picture book. 5-7)

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780789426376
Publisher:
DK Publishing, Inc.
Publication date:
09/01/1900
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.84(w) x 10.76(h) x 0.39(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Farmer Brown Shears His Sheep 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
The illustrations in this book are colorful and captivating. Small readers appreciate the vivid illustrations, humor, and rhyme. Children will laugh out loud with this excellent book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The rhyming and humor in this story is sure to please both children and adults alike. The illustrations are also quite humorous. I would recommend this to anyone.
Guest More than 1 year ago
There are other children's books telling how wool becomes clothing, but none so humorously and accurately as this one. I am a spinner and was delighted to find this story book, a charming marriage of amusing story, excellent illustrations and (mostly) realistic fiber handling. Lots of color and fun for all. I plan to use this book at spinning demonstrations before young groups.