Fashion in Fiction: Text and Clothing in Literature, Film and Television

Overview

This book examines the ways in which dress 'performs' in a wide range of contemporary and historical literary texts. Essays by North American, European and Australian scholars explore the function of clothing within fictional narratives, including those of film, television and advertising. The book provides a groundbreaking examination of the interconnected worlds of fashion and words, providing perspectives from socio-cultural, historical and theoretical readings of fashion and text-based communication. Covering...

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Overview

This book examines the ways in which dress 'performs' in a wide range of contemporary and historical literary texts. Essays by North American, European and Australian scholars explore the function of clothing within fictional narratives, including those of film, television and advertising. The book provides a groundbreaking examination of the interconnected worlds of fashion and words, providing perspectives from socio-cultural, historical and theoretical readings of fashion and text-based communication. Covering a variety of genres and periods, Fashion in Fiction analyzes fashion's role within a range of creative media, exploring the many ways that dress communicates, disrupts and modulates meaning across different cultures and contexts.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781847883575
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic
  • Publication date: 6/15/2009
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Peter McNeil is a professor of Design History at The University of Technology, Sydney and Foundation Chair of Fashion Studies at Stockholm University. He is editor of Fashion: Critical and Primary Sources and co-editor of Shoes: A History from Sandals to Sneakers, The Men's Fashion Reader and The Fashion History Reader: Global Perspectives.
Catherine Cole is a professor of Creative Writing at Royal Melbourbane Institute of Technology and author of The Poet who Forgot, The Grave at Thy Lu, Dry Dock, Skin Deep, Private Dicks and Fiesty Chicks: An Interrogation of Crime Fiction. Vicki Karaminas is a senior lecturer in Fashion Theory and Design Studies at the School of Design, The University of Technology, Sydney and co-editor of The Men's Fashion Reader.

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Table of Contents

CONTENTS
• Introduction
• PART ONE: FASHION TALES AND THE VISUAL IMAGINATION
• 1. The Question of Costume: Dressing for Success in the 19th century Novel. Claire Hughes
• 2. A Hovering Space: The Mystery of the Fashion Photograph Margaret Maynard, University of Queensland
• 3. Fashion and the Art of Class Deception: Clothing and Identity in Late Nineteenth-Century Fiction Rosy Aindow, University of Nottingham
• 4. Grisettes, cocottes, and bohèmes: Fashion and Fiction in Octave Tassaert's 'Boudoirs et mansardes' (1828) and 'Les amants et les époux' (1829) Denise Amy Baxter, University of North Texas
• 5. Fair Exchange: Novelist as Stylist, Designer as Storyteller Sophia Errey, RMIT, * 6. The Fashioned World of Andrea Zittel Tim Laurence, University of Technology, Sydney
• PART TWO: CROSSING CULTURES, QUEERING CULTURES
• 7. Junichiro Tanizaki's 'Naomi' and the Power of Foreign Clothing in Modern Japanese Fiction Toby Slade, Independent Academic, Tokyo
• 8. The Fire Sermon: Fashion, Memory and Representation. Adam Aitkin, University of Technology, Sydney
• 9. A Conceptual Framework for Brand Storytelling: Creating Context and Meaning for Cargo Pants. Joseph Hancock, Drexel University
• 10. Double Brides: Narratives of Desire in the recent 'Wedding Dresses' of lesbian couples. Catherine Harper (University of Brighton, U.K)
• 11. 'Collection L' Maja Gunn, Stockholm University
• PART THREE: FASHION'S TEXTUAL IDENTITIES
• 12. Aesthetic Movement Fashion Reform: Dress and Interiors Marilyn Casto, Virginia Tech University
• 13. Holly Golightly and the fashioning of the waif. Gabrielle Finanne, University of New South Wales
• 14. Becoming Neo: Costume, Gadgets and Transforming Masculinity in 'The Matrix' films. Sarah Gilligan, Hartlepool College of Further Education
• 15. Textile as Sign of Barthes' Bliss Concept within the Texture of Nietzsche, Dagmar Venohr, University of Potsdam
• Notes
• Bibliography
• Index

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