Fashion Nugget

Fashion Nugget

5.0 1
by Cake
     
 

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Sounding like a suburban, melodic white-funk-injected version of King Missile's performance art/standup comedy, "The Distance" became a novelty hit in the fall of 1996, sending Cake's second album, Fashion Nugget, to platinum status. Certainly, "The Distance" was the only reason Fashion Nugget went

Overview

Sounding like a suburban, melodic white-funk-injected version of King Missile's performance art/standup comedy, "The Distance" became a novelty hit in the fall of 1996, sending Cake's second album, Fashion Nugget, to platinum status. Certainly, "The Distance" was the only reason Fashion Nugget went platinum, because the remainder of the album is too collegiate and arcane for mainstream music tastes. It isn't because it's obscure or intellectual -- it's because the band is smirking. An "ironic" cover of Gloria Gaynor's "I Will Survive" is the key to the album, sending the signal that Cake consider themselves above everyone else, and nothing is too insignificant to make fun of. And that wouldn't necessarily have been a problem if they had the wit or musical skills that would make their music either funny or listenable. Instead, they wallow in sophomoric jokes that rely on self-consciously elaborate wordplay. Occasionally, their blend of collegiate musical styles -- funk, hip-hop, alternative rock -- makes the music easy to digest in small doses, such as "The Distance," but it isn't varied enough to prevent the album from becoming tedious when played straight through. [Fashion Nugget was issued in a "clean" version with all profanity removed.]

Product Details

Release Date:
09/17/1996
Label:
Volcano
UPC:
0614223422824
catalogNumber:
34228

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Fashion Nugget 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Considering the positively cold-blooded reviews that Cake consistantly recieves from self-important 'critics' (an apt term don't you think?) I am forced to do nothing less than absolutely love this album, unconditionaly. The idea of using horns in rock strikes me more as something to be extolled as opposed to expeled. Why call good ideas novelties? It does not seem like Cake the band views themselves as novelties, so why do we need to? This album is unique, funny, and fun to listen too. While everyone else can go looking for more in music, people who are easy to please spend their lives happier than all the rest of us. so People of the World Relax!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I REALLY like Cake, and Fashion Nugget is a good one. After listening to pop radio for 10 seconds and wishing I had been born deaf, Cake's style jolts the eardrums just right. I especially like their use of brass. (and I disagree with Stephen Thomas Erlewine wholeheartedly when he says that Fashion Nugget is tedious.) With the cd player on shuffle, my favorite songs are usually Cake's. I find them to be about as quality as my other favorite stuff (if not in musical virtuosity, at least in humor and unique sounds).
Guest More than 1 year ago
Within months of the release of Motorcade of Generosity, Cake released his second album, Fashion Nugget, a schizophrenic collection of lo-fi recordings from between 1990 and 1995. Much of the music on the album draws from the noisy, experimental post-punk of Stone Temple Pilots and the dirty, primitive junk rock of Mother Love Bone; his absurdist sense of humor surfaces only rarely, and only in the guise of such sophomoric cuts as ''I Will Survive'' and ''The Distance,'' while his sense of songcraft is inaudible. Essentially, the record was both a palate cleanser, one designed to scare away the ''Rock & Roll Lifestyle'' fans, and a bid for indie credibility, since the music on Fashion is equally as uncompromising and as unlistenable as Stone Temple Pilots or their many imitators at their most extreme.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Take it from a music freak born in 1960, this release is as good as some of the old stuff that rock was born from. Almost every track is good. If you want a refreshing sound with some nice horns, great guitars and a complete package, this is what you are looking for. For me, it takes real creativity to make profanity sound good, and this band has it. None of that poorly presented, angry rap sewer shoot. The tunes are diverse in lyrics and in overall presentation. The attitude includes deep feelings presented in a cerefree way. A real independent sound that gives people a feeling of confidence and letting go, and absolutely accomplishes the mission of expressing the band's intent.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It is rare for me to like something when I first hear it. And I loved this when I first heard it in my friends car. I knew I had to own it. They have an eclectic little appreciated sound of early No Doubt, They Might Be Giants, and early Barenaked Ladies. The songs are to the point, and make their point quickly. Somewhat stoic lyrics get emotions across quickly and satisfactory. I can't describe what exactly it is that made me like it. I just did.
Guest More than 1 year ago
ok, if you have never listened to CAKE you gotta, they r a majorly awesome band. every album is amazing. they r so unique and different. i love everything about CAKE. so buy this CD and all their CD's you'll love them...well, preview them first because most people dont like them...dont know why. they r amazing.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is such a cool cd I had so much fun listening to it have fun and enjoy listening to the best CD of all time
Guest More than 1 year ago
Within months of the release of Motorcade of Generosity, Cake released his second album, Fashion Nugget, a schizophrenic collection of lo-fi recordings from between 1990 and 1995. Much of the music on the album draws from the noisy, experimental post-punk of Stone Temple Pilots and the dirty, primitive junk rock of Mother Love Bone; his absurdist sense of humor surfaces only rarely, and only in the guise of such sophomoric cuts as ''I Will Survive'' and ''The Distance,'' while his sense of songcraft is inaudible. Essentially, the record was both a palate cleanser, one designed to scare away the ''Rock & Roll Lifestyle'' fans, and a bid for indie credibility, since the music on Fashion is equally as uncompromising and as unlistenable as Stone Temple Pilots or their many imitators at their most extreme
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago