The Fashionable Adventures of Joshua Craig

The Fashionable Adventures of Joshua Craig

by David Graham Phillips
     
 

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The Fashionable Adventures of Joshua Craig “The Fashionable Adventures of Joshua Craig,” published in 1909, was a brisk satire of that world. It features a romance between a rugged yet brilliant political appointee from Minnesota (Craig) and Margaret Severance, a member of a “frivolous, idle” family dwelling in a “sickly, sycophantic

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The Fashionable Adventures of Joshua Craig “The Fashionable Adventures of Joshua Craig,” published in 1909, was a brisk satire of that world. It features a romance between a rugged yet brilliant political appointee from Minnesota (Craig) and Margaret Severance, a member of a “frivolous, idle” family dwelling in a “sickly, sycophantic atmosphere.” Like all of Phillips’s novels, this one sold well, but The New York Times was certainly speaking for Goldsborough, who had by then embarked on a career as a concert violinist, when it called the work “unnecessarily crude” and “unnecessarily rude.” (by Peter Duffy of The New York Times, 1/14/2011)
"It was one of the top-floor-rear flats in the Wyandotte, not merely biggest of Washington's apartment hotels, but also "most exclusive"—which is the elegant way of saying most expensive. The Wyandotte had gone up before landlords grasped the obvious truth that in a fire-proof structure locations farthest from noise and dust should and could command highest prices; so Joshua Craig's flat was the cheapest in the house. The ninety dollars a month loomed large in his eyes, focused to little-town ideas of values; it was, in fact, small for shelter in "the DE LUXE district of the DE LUXE quarter," to quote Mrs. Senator Mulvey, that simple, far-Western soul, who, finding snobbishness to be the chief distinguishing mark of the Eastern upper classes, assumed it was a virtue, acquired it laboriously, and practiced it as openly and proudly as a preacher does piety. Craig's chief splendor was a sitting-room, called a parlor and bedecked in the red plush and Nottingham that represent hotel men's probably shrewd guess at the traveling public's notion of interior opulence. Next the sitting-room, and with the same dreary outlook, or, rather, downlook, upon disheveled and squalid back yards, was a dingy box of a bedroom. Like the parlor, it was outfitted with furniture that had degenerated upward, floor by floor, from the spacious and luxurious first-floor suites. Between the two rooms, in dark mustiness, lay a bathroom with suspicious-looking, wood-inclosed plumbing; the rusted iron of the tub peered through scuffs and seams in the age-grayed porcelain."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013821194
Publisher:
Robin Michell
Publication date:
12/29/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
174 KB

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