Fast Oscillations in Cortical Circuits / Edition 1

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Overview

The study of cortical oscillations is of great interest to those working in many areas of neuroscience. A fast coherent EEG rhythm called gamma or "40 Hz" has been implicated in cognition, as it may play a role in binding together features of objects. This rhythm may also be important for consciousness, as a number of drugs that induce general anesthesia disrupt the synchronization of the rhythm at clinically relevant concentrations. There is also suggestive evidence implicating dysfunction of gamma rhythms in Alzheimer's disease, and perhaps in other neuropsychiatric disorders.

In Fast Oscillations in CorticalCircuits, the authors use a combination of electrophysiological and computer modeling techniques to analyze how large networks of neurons can produce both epileptic seizures and functionally relevant synchronized oscillations. Specific topics covered include single hippocampal pyramid cells, hippocampal interneurons, synaptic interactions, gamma oscillations in brain slices as well as in vivo, the mechanisms of oscillation-synchronization (both local and long-range), the switch from gamma to beta frequencies and its implications for memory, and the significance of gamma oscillations for brain function.

The study of cortical oscillations is of great interest to those working in many areas of neuroscience. A fast coherent EEG rhythm called gamma or "40 Hz" has been implicated in cognition, as it may play a role in binding together features of objects. This rhythm may also be important for consciousness, as a number of drugs that induce general anesthesia disrupt the synchronization of the rhythm at clinically relevant concentrations. There is also suggestive evidence implicating dysfunction of gamma rhythms in Alzheimer’s disease, and perhaps in other neuropsychiatric disorders. The authors use a combination of electrophysiological and computer modeling techniques to analyze how large networks of neurons can produce both epileptic seizures and functionally relevant synchronized oscillations. Specific topics covered include single hippocampal pyramid cells, hippocampal interneurons, synaptic interactions, gamma oscillations in brain slices as well as in vivo, the mechanisms of oscillation-synchronization (both local and long-range), the switch from gamma to beta frequencies and its implications for memory, and the significance of gamma oscillations for brain function.

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Editorial Reviews

Dietmar Plenz
Overall, the book is succinct and informative, and leads the reader through difficult uncharted waters...the interdisciplinary work summarized in the book is exactly the type of research neccessary to fill the gap between mechanism and phenomenon in one of the fastest-moving fields in neuroscience.
Nature
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780262201186
  • Publisher: MIT Press
  • Publication date: 5/24/1999
  • Series: Computational Neuroscience
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 308
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Table of Contents

Series Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
Ch. 1 Oscillations: What They Are, What They Might Be Good For 1
Ch. 2 Single Hippocampal Pyramidal Cells 7
Ch. 3 Single Hippocampal Interneurons 35
Ch. 4 Synaptic Interactions in the Hippocampus 47
Ch. 5 Networks of Pyramidal Cells: Synchronized Bursts 73
Ch. 6 Networks of Interneurons I: Synchronized Bursts 103
Ch. 7 Gamma Oscillations in Vivo 113
Ch. 8 Networks of Interneurons II: Gamma Oscillations in Vitro 153
Ch. 9 Gamma Oscillations in Networks of Interneurons and Pyramidal Cells in Vitro I: Mechanisms of Synchronization 185
Ch. 10 Gamma Oscillations in Networks of Interneurons and Pyramidal Cells in Vitro II: Synaptic Plasticity and the Switch to Beta Frequencies 237
Ch. 11 Conclusions: Are Gamma Oscillations Significant for Brain Function? 267
References 273
Index 317
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