Fast Track Adoption: The Faster, Safer Way to Privately Adopt a Baby [NOOK Book]

Overview


Most couples in the U.S. have to wait up to seven years to adopt an infant domestically--and all the expense and waiting doesn't always result in a successful adoption. Now, rather than relying on slow-paced and expensive adoption agencies, many couples are choosing to privately adopt a child. By eliminating the adoption agency, couples can customize and control their own adoption plan.

Inside this book, couples will learn how becoming proactive in the adoption process may ...

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Fast Track Adoption: The Faster, Safer Way to Privately Adopt a Baby

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Overview


Most couples in the U.S. have to wait up to seven years to adopt an infant domestically--and all the expense and waiting doesn't always result in a successful adoption. Now, rather than relying on slow-paced and expensive adoption agencies, many couples are choosing to privately adopt a child. By eliminating the adoption agency, couples can customize and control their own adoption plan.

Inside this book, couples will learn how becoming proactive in the adoption process may significantly speed up the adoption. Following the Fast Track method, readers will learn how to:

  • Establish a budget
  • Assemble a professional team
  • Obtain an approved home study
  • Prepare an effective family profile
  • Advertise for and talk to potential birth mothers
  • Detect warning signs for frauds and scams
  • Be prepared at the hospital

With this book as their guide, potential parents can actively pick their own birth mother. By doing so, couples will save time and money, reduce stress, and, most importantly, find a baby to adopt.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781429971423
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 4/1/2010
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 289
  • Sales rank: 1,285,968
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author



Susan Burns, Psy.D., is an adoptive mother of two and a licensed psychologist with over 17 years of experience helping children and families. Using the Fast Track method, Burns and her husband, Scott, adopted their first baby in October 1997 and their second baby in April 2001. She currently lives with her family in Hawaii.
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Table of Contents

Foreword ix
Acknowledgments xi
Note to the Reader xiii
Introduction: Our Adoption Journey 1
1. The Fast Track Approach 9
2. Step One: Get Ready 29
3. Step Two: Establish Your Budget 60
4. Step Three: Assemble Your Professional Team 75
5. Step Four: Obtain an Approved Home Study 95
6. Step Five: Prepare an Effective Profile 111
7. Step Six: Advertise 127
8. Step Seven: Field Calls with Confidence 160
9. Step Eight: Create a Successful Adoption Plan 184
10. Step Nine: Prepare for Your Baby's Homecoming 210
Appendix 229
Selected References 257
Index 259
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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2008

    Adoption should not be fast

    April 13, 2004 -- Susan Burns, Psy.D. is undoubtedly proud of her book 'Fast Track Adoption' which provides prospective adopters some ideas on how to go about soothing a frightened young woman's fears and making her feel she is making a good decision for her child. But, there is one angle her book does not cover: How will your adopted child's natural mother feel when she finds out how proud you are of the methods you used to talk her out of her child? How will she feel when you break all the promises you made to her? Burns writes: 'Without an agency's interference, (the child's parents) and (the people considering adoption) have a greater voice in in making key decisions, often resulting in a better 'fit' for everyone involved.' '...knowing about the (prospective) adopting family prior to the placement can assist a (natural) mother in her grieving process by reassuring her that she has made the right choice.' It seems unlikely to me that Burns is truly concerned about everyone involved or about the grieving process of a mother who has lost her child to adoption. I got this email today(April 9, 2004) from a friend who is very involved with the open adoption community: 'I'm grieving my good friend right now. Cindy was a member of my adoption group for a year and a half -- we were supposed to meet next month. The (people who adopted) her daughter broke promises and Cindy never recovered. She took her life yesterday. Her daughter will be three on the 19th.' 'I'm trying to help the members of my group ...and myself grieve. We were all SO close. She also left behind two teen boys. Please keep them in your prayers.' '(The woman who adopted her daughter) wrote the sickening new adoption book 'Fast Track Adoption' ...and may even appear on 20/20 talking about how to get a baby quick. Cindy found out about this book by accident and was devastated by it's contents and how she was left out and used. Forgotten.' Many people are unaware of this dark side of adoption. The adoption industry has found ways to thwart attempts by natural moms and adoptees to voice their concerns about unethical adoption practices. One of the most revolting of the tactics used to obtain babies is the promise of 'open adoption', the promise of continued contact with their child, made only with the intent to lure in unsuspecting mothers who might have otherwise kept their child. Open adoption agreements are not legally binding as other child custody or visitation agreements are and this frequently has devastating consequences. Many a mother is grieving the loss of a child to adoption. This grieving is compounded when she has so obviously, blatantly been used as a baby-making machine and then tossed out like yesterday's garbage once her child is in possession of the adopters. In Cindy's case, not only she but her sons and probably other familly members were expecting contact with their sister, granddaughter, neice as well. This is for Cindy and all other moms who have been so used. This is for Cindy's daughter, her sons, her mother and father, her whole family. I hope our churches will mention this from the pulpit and work to enact change. I hope our human rights organizations will take note and work to enact changes. I hope women's organizations will for once stand up for these women who have been so long marginalized in this way and work to prevent further abuse. Not everyone benefits from adoption and it's time people knew about it and did something. Those mothers and fathers who are making a decision whether to keep their child or surrender their child for adoption deserve legal protections which include real information about the emotional risks to themselves, their child and other family members. They deserve to be protected from slick advertising and sales pitches from those seeking to adopt independently, from the adoption industry and from adoption lawyers. They deserve to be protected from the pressure put on

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2006

    awful book

    This is the worst book I have ever read.I am trying to adopt,but would like to do it ethically.I was amazed at the methods recommended by this book.I could not look my child in the eye if I adopted her this way.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2004

    wouldn't recommend at all

    This book is probably the worst I've read about adoption to date. I would not recommend it to anyone for any reason. There are books out there which will better prepare you for an honest, open, mutually respectful domestic adoption. Two thumbs down. I won't use any of the methods in this book for my own infant adoption.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2012

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    Posted August 3, 2011

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