Fasti

Fasti

3.7 3
by Ovid
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Fasti is both a calendar of daily rituals and a witty sequence of stories. Using the first six months of the Roman religious calendar as a frame, Ovid weaves Greek and Roman history and mythology, astronomical observations and political tidbits into a lively tapestry shot through with uncomfortable political echoes. Augustus tried to control his subjects by

Overview

Fasti is both a calendar of daily rituals and a witty sequence of stories. Using the first six months of the Roman religious calendar as a frame, Ovid weaves Greek and Roman history and mythology, astronomical observations and political tidbits into a lively tapestry shot through with uncomfortable political echoes. Augustus tried to control his subjects by imposing his own accounts of history and an annual cycle of festivals on them, but Ovid brilliantly debunks Augustus's versions with his own reflections on patriotism, militarism, and public virtue with earthy images of sensual pleasures and sexual adventures.

From the description of Mars' rape of Silvia—"Mars sees her, desires what he sees, takes what he desires"—with its echoes of Julius Caesar's famous boast, to the portrait of Romulus as a violent thug and impious rapist, Ovid debunks official heroes and dismantles the foundations of Rome's power structures. Written while Ovid was in exile, Fasti is at once a wonderfully witty sequence of stories and a courageous political manifesto.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Fasti has burst upon the scholarly scene as a work of tremendous importance for our understanding of religion under the Principate...have provided us with what must be seen as a new commentary upon the poem...But the real value of this new Fasti, of course, lies not in its front or back material but in the lively rendition of Ovid's own words...Boyle and Woodard have given us a fresh-sounding poem with updated diction." —Christopher Brunelle, Boston College
Llewelyn Morgan
Ovid's poem on the Roman calendar is now fully rehabilated as a text displaying the wittiest poet of antiquity at his lucid, subversive, scintillating best: a selective and much embellished account of the Roman ritual year, one book per month, either lost after the end of June, or aborted by the poet, ahead of the politically sensitive months names after Julius (Caesar) and Augustus.
Times Literary Supplement

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780140446906
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
12/28/2000
Series:
Penguin Classics Series
Pages:
432
Sales rank:
776,233
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 7.80(h) x 0.73(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"Fasti has burst upon the scholarly scene as a work of tremendous importance for our understanding of religion under the Principate...have provided us with what must be seen as a new commentary upon the poem...But the real value of this new Fasti, of course, lies not in its front or back material but in the lively rendition of Ovid's own words...Boyle and Woodard have given us a fresh-sounding poem with updated diction." —Christopher Brunelle, Boston College

Meet the Author

Ovid (43 BC-AD 17) was born in central Italy. He was sent to Rome where he realised that his talent lay with poetry rather than with politics. His first published work was 'Amores', a collection of short love poems. He was expelled in A.D. 8 by Emperor Augustus for an unknown reason and went to Tomis on the Black Sea, where he died.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Fasti 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
EugeneTX More than 1 year ago
Thhis is an outstanding book for anyone who is at all interested in the history of early Greek and Roman Literature. If you have a good understanding of the Greek Pantheon, you will appreciate Ovid's contribution all the more. Imagine yourself living and reading at or near the time that Ovid wrote. Imagine the world as it was and the way folks believed it could be. This is entertaining and ancient. This should be mandatory reading for every Freshmen High student or earlier. An outstanding translation definitely worth the time and money.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Either you are the worlds biggest geek or you are a teacher of some sort. I couldnt care less which you were. Anyway, I'll just cut to the chase. No one likes your opionis, nerd!!!!!!! Ha! Even i'm not that big a nerd!