Fatal Memories

Fatal Memories

4.6 3
by Vladimir Lange
     
 

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FATAL MEMORIES The MEG-a revolutionary brain scanner-is the culmination of Dr. Anne Powell's brilliant career as a neuro-psychiatrist. Designed to accomplish in seconds what conventional psychotherapy can only hope to achieve in years, the MEG could change the course of psychiatric treatment forever-if it doesn't kill her first. A clash with the FDA forces Powell to

Overview

FATAL MEMORIES The MEG-a revolutionary brain scanner-is the culmination of Dr. Anne Powell's brilliant career as a neuro-psychiatrist. Designed to accomplish in seconds what conventional psychotherapy can only hope to achieve in years, the MEG could change the course of psychiatric treatment forever-if it doesn't kill her first. A clash with the FDA forces Powell to leave Boston and continue her research at the world-renowned Pavlov Institute in Moscow. There, a laboratory accident reignites a centuries-old conflict, and threatens to return a blood thirsty dictator to power. Powell soon realizes that the MEG is capable of far more than brain-scanning. She is forced to confront past and present, reality and memory, love and hate in the ultimate battle to save herself-and thwart a plot that could hurl a newly democratic Russia back to its totalitarian past. Fatal Memories breaks the mold of medical thrillers by combining compelling, multi-layered characters with far-reaching, science-based technology and vivid cinematic prose to reach a thrilling and inevitable conclusion: We are what we were.

Editorial Reviews

Andra Tracy
"...The scenes from Russia were so powerful that they've remained vivid in my mind. This was a well-crafted novel and I will be urging my friends to buy it and then read it."
booksense.com
Dave Wilks
"A genuinely suspenseful thriller [that] moves at a whirlwind pace... Russia comes alive and fills your senses. You walk the streets of Moscow with the characters..."
roundtablereviews.com
Publishers Weekly
The invention of a medical device that can cure mental illness but has frightening side effects fuels this promising if unwieldy debut novel that straddles the line between thriller and love story. The device, known as a MEG and built by Boston doctor Anne Powell, has yet to be approved for sale in the United States. Undeterred, Russian physicians at the Pavlov Institute purchase one, and Powell heads to Moscow to oversee its use. Initial tests on Russian patients are encouraging, but unbeknownst to Powell, officials at the institute have smuggled in a special guinea pig: a schizophrenic political candidate with authoritarian tendencies curiously reminiscent of those of his grandfather, Josef Stalin. Meanwhile, Powell has her own personal troubles. As a result of exposure to the MEG's lasers, she keeps having disturbing dreams that seem to transport her to a past life in Russia 500 years ago, where she is in love with a man who bears a striking resemblance to one of her colleagues, the dashingly handsome researcher Volodya Verkhov. Lange, a doctor and producer of women's health education programs, ably crafts a complicated tale rich in Russian history and peopled by a large cast of characters, though it may disappoint some readers expecting more intrigue around the MEG and Stalin's descendant and less love story between Powell and Verkhov. Agent, Scott Hoffman at PMA. 10-city author tour. (Mar. 15) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780981948928
Publisher:
SCB Distributors
Publication date:
07/01/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
1,045,267
File size:
502 KB

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What People are saying about this

"Vladimir Lange has crafted a winner... Get set for a roller coaster ride with hairpin turns all along the way."
—bestselling author of Society
Michael Palmer
"Vladimir Lange has crafted a winner... Get set for a roller coaster ride with hairpin turns all along the way."
—bestselling author of Society
Judy Illes
"If we could one day use imaging to recall or erase memories from our past, should we? At what risk? These compelling questions of brain science, technology and ethics are entangled in the high suspense science fiction of Fatal Memories."
Ph.D. Director, Program for Neuroethics Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics and Department of Radiology Stanford University President, Women in Neuroscience
Victor Haughton
"Vladimir Lange's imaginative science fiction adventure will appeal to physicians and scientists who appreciate the rapid advance of neuroimaging. Not only can modern medical imaging show brain structure; it can reveal brain function. Neurointerventionalists, who demonstrate every day that serious disorders can be treated without opening the skull, should enjoy the vision of Magnetoencephalography (MEG) utilized therapeutically. The heroine may seem familiar to some readers who count neuroradiologists in their circle of friends."
MD President of the American Society of Neuroradiology
Tess Gerritsen
"Fatal Memories is a compelling, endlessly fascinating read. Far more than a medical thriller, it weaves history and romance into a tale that asks: do we carry the memory of past lives in our genes?"
—bestselling author of Body Double

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Fatal Memories 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Can memories be inherited? Are we born with memories of what happened to our ancestors? Vladimir Lange has written a provocative tale that explores these questions in the setting of Medieval through Post-Soviet Russia with both its heartfelt emotions of love and its just-under-the-surface potential for brutality. More Jules Vern than Michael Crichton, he imagines as-yet-undeveloped technology and then imposes the unanticipated impact of this technology on the best - and the worst - of human behavior. He reminds us that the world will not remain as it is now, and that medical progress can sometimes provide simple answers and leave us to try to comprehend what the questions say about us.
Guest More than 1 year ago
When I first picked up this book, I saw 'medical thriller' on the cover. I was thinking I was going to get a ho-hum medical mystery a la Robin Cook. 'Fatal Memories' BLOWS AWAY anything I ever read by Cook! I'm a sci-fi buff, and this book was filled with things that had no trouble holding my attention -- exciting new technology with frightening, unexpected consequences, and a quasi-time-travel aspect that managed to get more and more suspenseful as the plot unfolded. I highly recommend this book!
Guest More than 1 year ago
'Do we carry the memory of past lives in our genes?' 'What if there were a device that could access these memories?' 'Why do people have deja vu and love-at-first-sight experiences?' What I personally like about the book is that it combines very credible science-based medical technology, (without that sci-fi stuff!) with a powerful love story between interesting characters (without the gooshy romance stuff!) Without giving away too much of the plot: Dr. Anne Powell, a brilliant neuro-psychiatrist, invented the MEG -- a brain scanner designed to access remote memories. In trained hands, the MEG can accomplish in seconds what conventional psychotherapy can only hope to achieve in years. A clash with the FDA forces Powell to leave Boston and continue her research at the world-renowned Pavlov Institute in Moscow. There, an accidental exposure to the MEG triggers a series of dreams that make Anne realize that centuries ago she had a different life -- and a tragic relationship with a man who bears a striking resemblance to one of her current Russian colleagues. As Powell learns that the MEG is capable of far more than brain-scanning, she is forced to confront past and present, reality and memory, love and hate, in the battle to save the life of her lover, and her own sanity. I enjoyed the book and if you are into high-tech medical thrillers you will too. I highly recommend it. A good read.