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Fatal System Error: The Hunt for the New Crime Lords Who Are Bringing Down the Internet
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Fatal System Error: The Hunt for the New Crime Lords Who Are Bringing Down the Internet

4.2 25
by Joseph Menn
 

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ISBN-10: 1586487485

ISBN-13: 9781586487485

Pub. Date: 01/26/2010

Publisher: PublicAffairs

This gripping espionage tale penetrates the network of international mobsters and hackers who use the Internet to extort money from businesses, steal from tens of millions of consumers, and attack government networks

Overview

This gripping espionage tale penetrates the network of international mobsters and hackers who use the Internet to extort money from businesses, steal from tens of millions of consumers, and attack government networks

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781586487485
Publisher:
PublicAffairs
Publication date:
01/26/2010
Pages:
281
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.30(d)

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Fatal System Error: The Hunt for the New Crime Lords Who Are Bringing Down the Internet 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 25 reviews.
LarryHires More than 1 year ago
"A lawyer with a briefcase can steal more than 1,000 men with guns." - Don Corleone in Mario Puzo's The Godfather. © 1983 "A small force of hackers is stronger than multiple thousands of the current armed forces." - Russian Duma deputy Nikolai Kuryanovich cited in Fatal System Error. © 2010 The first quote above is fiction. The second quote is not. As I read Kuryanovich's comment, the quote by the Godfather crossed my mind. Across the span of 27 years life was imitating art by insisting that stealing money or secrets by using the intellect was superior to stealing either one by using violence. This book bridges the gap between cyber crime and cyber warfare. The war underway is largely being fought out of sight, that is, until you become a victim of identity theft and have your bank account wiped out by unseen hackers or, heaven forbid, the electric grids of all of North America get shut down. Criminals basically want your money. Enemy countries want to destroy us. The most important cyber battles are therefore ideological. This is another example of life imitating art. In the movie, Alien vs. Predator, that battle between two other-worldly creatures takes place underground at the South Pole completely out of sight of most Humans. So it is with cyber battles. They, too, are mostly out of sight. But they are real and real people do get hurt in these battles. If hacking isn't brought under control soon, it may turn out that the population of the entire earth might become collateral damage. This book doesn't say that, but the implication is very strong. As with most conflicts, there are the "good guys" and "bad guys." The good guys singled out in this book are just three people although there are others. One good guy is Lyon Barrett, a self-taught American entrepreneur who spent a lot of his time fighting off bad guys who were making life impossible through Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks against some of his clients some of which were also bad guys, mostly gambling companies operating in other countries. A second good guy is Andy Crocker of the UK's NHTCU (National Hi-Tech Crime Unit), who spent most of three years in Russia working with information uncovered by Barrett, and a third good guy is a Russian, Igor Yakovlev, in Russia's MVD (Russian Ministry of the Interior), Russia's equivalent of the FBI. The bad guys are too many to list here except for one, Ivan Maksakov. Barrett had uncovered the true identity of Maksakov, a feat almost unequaled in this cyber war. Maksakov was a reverse Barrett. The difference was that Maksakov was an enabler of DDoS attacks whereas Barrett was a defender against them for his clients. When Maksakov was caught, he appeared to be remorseful working with Yakovlev and Crocker to identify others involved in this extortion scheme, but at his trial with two other Russians he turned and pleaded not guilty surprising Crocker, Yakovlev, the whole prosecution team, and even the judge. Eventually, he was convicted and sentenced to several years in a Russian jail. Menn does address what can and must be done to stop this growing threat. One suggestion is that the Internet has to be scrapped and completely re-written with very different rules. Until then, we have to deal with the ongoing cyber threats to our way of life. We need to begin today. This is serious stuff. We cannot just turn off our computers and work without them. We are in too deep for that.
RolfDobelli More than 1 year ago
The Internet has become the ultimate mob hangout, a dangerous venue where U.S. Mafiosi, vicious Russian gang members and illegal hackers from many nations, especially from Eastern Europe, ply their dirty deeds. Cybersecurity reporter Joseph Menn examines cybercrime, exposing the bad guys while telling exciting stories about two intrepid investigators - Barrett Lyon, a U.S.-based "white hat" security hacker, and Andy Crocker, a British cybersecurity agent - who have successfully waged war against cybercriminals. Menn's book is both fascinating and disturbing, with its discussion of "zombie armies" of computers, and its exotically named online desperadoes, like CumbaJohnny. getAbstract recommends this gripping saga to those who want to protect themselves from cybercrime. This outstanding book's only deficiency is, ironically, its remarkable, overwhelming abundance of complex detail. If you think you need a cast list, tech manual and dictionary of arcane online terms, never mind; just hang on for a scary, revealing ride.
tommysalami More than 1 year ago
A good thriller style read about U.S. and Russian organized crime involvement with gambling, identity theft, DDOS attacks, and more. Not highly in depth, I wish it had profiled more than 2 white hats who hunt these guys down, or went into more detail on the American side, which sort of fizzles out.
carol223CS More than 1 year ago
Fatal Error Fatal Error is the fourth book in The Jess Kimball Series. This book follows Jess Kimball from a case she has been investigating in the United States to Italy. Jess is an Investigative reporter for Taboo Magazine. She is trying to stop two Italian Brothers who are targeting elderly people. Jess becomes the monkey in the middle between the American FBI , the Italian ROS and one of the brothers. Again this book is fast-paced, with interesting characters, plenty of suspense, thrills, chills and unexpected twists. Kudos to Diane Capri and Nigel Blackwell for two exciting, breathe taking reads. Thanks to the author for the eBook. My opinion is my own.
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Shellorne Smith More than 1 year ago
the commotup