Fate

Fate

4.3 33
by Jennifer Lynn Barnes
     
 

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For the past two years, Bailey Morgan has lived a double life: high school student by day, ancient mystical being by night. As the third Fate, Bailey literally controls the fate of the world, but as Plain Old Bailey, her life is falling apart. She’s got a tattoo that was supposed to be temporary (but isn’t), friendships that were supposed to last

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Overview

For the past two years, Bailey Morgan has lived a double life: high school student by day, ancient mystical being by night. As the third Fate, Bailey literally controls the fate of the world, but as Plain Old Bailey, her life is falling apart. She’s got a tattoo that was supposed to be temporary (but isn’t), friendships that were supposed to last forever (but might not), and no idea what her future holds after high school graduation.

Then Bailey meets the rest of the Sidhe, an ancient race defined by their power, beauty, and a sinister habit of getting what they want at any cost. Before Bailey knows it, she’s being drawn into an otherworldly web more complicated than anything she weaves as a mortal Fate.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Barnes crosses Greek gods with faeries in her addition to the teens-with-special-powers-and-destinies genre. In this companion novel to Tattoo, Bailey, aka the Fate of Life ("single-handedly responsible for weaving the lives of the entire world"), is back and joined once more by best friends Delia, Annabelle and Zo. With the help of mysterious pendants (Bailey's friends have lost the powers they possessed in the first book), they must help Bailey face the Reckoning, when she must choose between her world and the Otherworld. Barnes has her mythical realms covered with the Otherworld, "also known as Faerie, Olympus, Avalon, and the Beyond," where Bailey spends her nights while her less-mythic friends dream. Bailey's upbeat narration adds flair to this story of girl power and friendship, though her Otherworldly trips (which are, unfortunately, italicized) cover large swaths of the book and can feel like a disruption. Readers who hang tight to the friendship arc, though, will find this story pulpy but fun. Ages 12-up. (Mar.)

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Children's Literature - Amanda MacGregor
Bailey seems like your average high school senior. She hangs out at the mall, has three really close friends, and is worried about college. Actually, Bailey is anything but average. At night, she enters a mystical realm (which she calls the Nexus) to do work as the Fate of Life. Part of an ancient race of magical and powerful beings called the Sidhe, Bailey lives her life half in the mortal realm and half in the Nexus. Such as been her life for the past two years, and though it has been strange, Bailey has gotten used to it. When she ventures into the Otherworld (the Sidhe world) Bailey immediately feels at home. It is here that she learns of her Reckoning, when she will have to choose allegiance to one of the Sidhe courts. Bailey cannot imagine leaving her friends and the mortal world behind, but the Sidhe do their best to explain compelling reasons to choose immortality. Bailey thought having to choose a college was a difficult choice! That's nothing like carrying the fate of two worlds in your hands. This sequel to Tattoo can be read on its own, as long as readers do not mind feeling a little lost on occasion. Recaps of the events in Tattoo are interspersed throughout the text, but often come long after an explanation is needed. Bailey's three best friends play significant roles in the book, but they are too one-dimensional. The writing can sometimes be heavy-handed, and even Bailey acknowledges that the dialogue comes off as cheesy (especially in the Sidhe world). Those complaints aside, Barnes has created a relatively satisfying mix of fantasy and reality that will have wide appeal. Reviewer: Amanda MacGregor
Kirkus Reviews
Despite her mother's nagging, high-school senior Bailey has no post-graduation plans: Picking a college isn't her biggest concern, especially when the fate of the world rests on her shoulders. For readers familiar with Bailey's first outing, Tattoo (2007), buying her awesome responsibility, which stems from her role as one of the three mythological Fates, may come easy, as the previous text fully describes the genesis of her mythological position. New readers may not find this premise as clear, especially when Bailey introduces the Nexus, a secondary world in which she spends her nights weaving society's fate in long, italicized passages. Bailey's age-appropriate voice helps to anchor her Otherworldly adventures in reality, imparting humor and bringing to life her well-defined relationship with her three best friends and her anxiety about their inevitable separation at graduation. Sticklers for mythological purity will wonder how the Irish Sidhe got mixed up with the Greek Fates, but those just looking for a quick read probably won't care all that much. A fantastical and well-woven web of mythology, teenage anxiety and friendship. (Fantasy. YA)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780385735377
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
03/10/2009
Pages:
368
Sales rank:
346,808
Product dimensions:
5.20(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range:
12 Years

Meet the Author

Jennifer Lynn Barnes earned a bachelor’s degree from Yale University and a master’s from Cambridge University. Fate is her sixth novel for young adults. You can visit her online at www.jenniferlynnbarnes.com.

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4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 34 reviews.
MeiDiver More than 1 year ago
Synopsis Set two years after the events in Tattoo, Bailey and her friends are getting ready to graduate from high school and move on with their lives. Unfortunately, Bailey is not ready to move on, or away from her friends. Plus, everything is complicated by her work as a Fate and the quickly approaching Reckoning. Can she find a balance in her life? Review This novel was at least as enjoyable as the first novel. I really enjoyed the fact that Bailey's friends would get mad at her for "moping" as many teen novels really focus on the angsty side of life. The new characters were interesting, though I found some of the references to Greek and Roman mythology to be a bit confusing and muddled in this installment. My Recommendation This book is great for tweens, there are no questionable elements like sex, drugs, or rock'n'roll. 3/5
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Amazing!
cmmast86 More than 1 year ago
I was cruising books on my BN Nook and got curious. It's surprisingly good and I recommend this read. (I had already read the first book too. Both very well written.)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A wonderful, captivating ,and well-written sequel to Tattoo.The characters are believable as well as their connections to each other. I hope the Jennifer Lynn Barnes will continue this story.I can hardly wait.
pagese More than 1 year ago
I picked up this book a long time ago, not realizing that it was a sequel to Tattoo. I honestly picked it up because of the pretty cover. I didn't read it right after finishing Tattoo, so I honestly didn't remember what had happened in the previous story. I'm not sure if that lapse in between stories contributed to my inability of get into this story. I honestly almost gave up on this book a couple of times. I felt like it had a hard time getting past the Sidhe background. It was long and drawn out. The action was reserved for the last little bit of the book. It really wasn't enough to make the book really worthwhile to seek out. I did like how the ending turned out. The Sidhe were trying to make Bailey play by their rules, when they didn't really apply to her. She something entirely different, so she should be an exception to the rules. I also enjoyed how the Sidhe represented different gods/goddesses throughout history. I enjoy when a book can take different views from different cultures and wrap them into one story that makes sense. I would probably pass on this book unless you enjoy other books by Barnes, or have all ready read Tattoo.
happy-2 More than 1 year ago
very, very good
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