Fathers and Sons in Athens: Ideology and Society in the Era of the Peloponnesian War

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Overview

Father-son conflict was for the Athenians a topic of widespread interest that touched the core of both family and political life, particularly during times of social upheaval. In this vivid account of the intermingling of politics and the private sphere in classical Athens, Barry Strauss explores the tensions experienced by a society that cherished both youthful independence and paternal authority. He examines father-son relations within the Athenian family and the way these relations were represented in a wide variety of political and literary texts. His inquiry reveals that representations of patricide, father beating, and son murdering did not necessarily coincide with actual instances but rather served as metaphors for intergenerational tensions fueled by democracy, the sophists, and the Peloponnesian War.

Strauss points out that major Athenian accounts of father-son conflict—such as the myth of the Athenian national hero, Theseus, and the plays of Euripides and Aristophanes—were either produced or enthusiastically revived during the war. He traces the relation between the use of familial metaphors in these accounts and fluctuations in Athenian wartime ideology: as the fortunes of Athens shifted, citizens went from confidence in their elder statesman Pericles to enthusiasm over a new generation of young politicians led by Pericles' ward Alcibiades, and back to an insistence on what Athenians called the "paternal" rule of older leaders. In emphasizing the blurring of boundaries between family and state, or private and public, in Athens, Strauss encourages us to reflect anew on the distinction between these concepts and on the difficulties of putting that distinction into practice today.

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Editorial Reviews

Bryn Mawr Classical Reviews
This work is exciting and important not only for its thesis but for the new and often exhilarating way in which we see language and history and texts combined and interpreted.
— Thomas M. Falkner
The Historian
Particularly noteworthy is Strauss's lucid demonstration of how the rhetoric of familial breakdown informed political discourse in the wake of the disastrous Athenian defeat in Sicily. . . . One of the most original and interesting works on classical Athens to appear in years.
— Stanley M. Burstein
History: Reviews of New Books
The best study in print of father-son relations in Athens.
— James M. Williams
Bryn Mawr Classical Review

This work is exciting and important not only for its thesis but for the new and often exhilarating way in which we see language and history and texts combined and interpreted.
— Thomas M. Falkner
History: Reviews of New Books

The best study in print of father-son relations in Athens.
— James M. Williams
Bryn Mawr Classical Reviews - Thomas M. Falkner
This work is exciting and important not only for its thesis but for the new and often exhilarating way in which we see language and history and texts combined and interpreted.
The Historian - Stanley M. Burstein
Particularly noteworthy is Strauss's lucid demonstration of how the rhetoric of familial breakdown informed political discourse in the wake of the disastrous Athenian defeat in Sicily. . . . One of the most original and interesting works on classical Athens to appear in years.
History: Reviews of New Books - James M. Williams
The best study in print of father-son relations in Athens.
From the Publisher
"This work is exciting and important not only for its thesis but for the new and often exhilarating way in which we see language and history and texts combined and interpreted."—Thomas M. Falkner, Bryn Mawr Classical Reviews

"Particularly noteworthy is Strauss's lucid demonstration of how the rhetoric of familial breakdown informed political discourse in the wake of the disastrous Athenian defeat in Sicily. . . . One of the most original and interesting works on classical Athens to appear in years."—Stanley M. Burstein, The Historian

"The best study in print of father-son relations in Athens."—James M. Williams, History: Reviews of New Books

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691015910
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 2/14/1997
  • Edition description: REPRINT
  • Pages: 299
  • Product dimensions: 5.49 (w) x 8.49 (h) x 0.74 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface
List of abbreviations
1 Introduction: Solidarity Or Conflict? 1
2 Intellectual Paternity 21
Appendix to Chapter 2: Patrios and Pater 57
3 Solidarity: Proud Fathers, Obedient Sons 61
4 Conflict: The Sons of Theseus 100
5 The Hour of the Son, ca. 450-414 BC 130
6 The Return of the Father, 413-399 BC 179
Conclusion 212
Notes 221
Bibliography 253
Index 276
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